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john.r.davies

Modified and fabricated tools - Show & Tell

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Idea came up in another thread - tools you have modified or even fabricated yourself, that may be useful to others.

 

Here's two of mine:

 

Angled spanners. I have Malcolm Jones's 'overhead' Pi throttle linkage, that has droplinks down to the butterfly spindles, between the throttle bodies. They need to be adjusted for length, and have small spherical bearing at each end, with opposite threads, so the link bar can be turned to do that. But the lock nut at the bottom is inaccessible without these 8 and 10mm spanners, whose open ends have been cut off and welded back on at an angle.

 

post-535-0-46245400-1498298381_thumb.jpg

 

Limited access puller. The radiator is right in front of the engine on a Vitesse, no space to use a convenional tripod puller. I made this to do the job. It's a bar with short 'jaws' at each end, bolted on so that the distance from the jaw tip to the bar can be adjusted by spacer washers, for different thicknesses of pulley. Place it across the pulley and undo the pulley bolt. As the bolt comes out, the pressure on the bar pulls the pulley off. A useful trick is to place a small bead of weld exactly where the bolt head centre presses on the bar, which stops it wandering off centre.

 

post-535-0-52032900-1498298798_thumb.jpg

 

What have you got?

JOhn

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I made up this puller from a wire wheel adapter for the rear hubs.................................it didn't work :( but then again, it didn't break, which was the fate of a couple I tried before.

Image006.jpg

 

 

Steve

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Not really a modified tool, bit a neat trick i thought!

 

Method to separate the diff side shaft tapers so as to be able to replace the seals, worked well and saved a trip to use a press.

 

Steve

post-9473-0-89147100-1498316594_thumb.jpg

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Steve

 

To get my hubs off I made up two plates 30mm thick (that was all I had) and flame cut out a large hole ( half in each plate) and finally ground it to suit the bearing diameter so that it was fully supported when I put it under a 10 Ton press, to prevent buckeling . If you have read William's book he warns you that they come out with a hell of a bang, so leave the axle nut on a few turns so that the half shafts don't hit the floor when they come off..

I have toyed with the idea of modifying the engine crane cylinder and the main frame to make up such a press.

 

Dave

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I watched Glen Hewett (Protek) dismantle my rear hub last week.

He removed the split pin, undid the nut and removed the washer.

Then he replaced the nut, but reversed, so that the slots for the split pin were near the hub.

He wound the nut to the point where it was exactly flush with the end of the half shaft, thus protecting the thread and leaving a small gap (about washer thickness) between hub and nut.

It took just over 10 tons to separate hub and half shaft, and it certainly creates an impressive bang!

Glen says that he has seen 20 tons required to separate some hubs.

 

Ian Cornish

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Hi John,

nothing too clever - it is just a spanner. I made it to hold the hub in order to tighten the nuts up.

 

Roger

 

 

 

 

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That's called 'habitat' in Lunnon.

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Hi John,

nothing too clever - it is just a spanner. I made it to hold the hub in order to tighten the nuts up.

 

Roger

 

attachicon.gifP1030127a.jpg

 

 

HI Roger

Exactly like mine to be able to pull the nut up to 125ft/lbs.

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I watched Glen Hewett (Protek) dismantle my rear hub last week.

He removed the split pin, undid the nut and removed the washer.

Then he replaced the nut, but reversed, so that the slots for the split pin were near the hub.

He wound the nut to the point where it was exactly flush with the end of the half shaft, thus protecting the thread and leaving a small gap (about washer thickness) between hub and nut.

It took just over 10 tons to separate hub and half shaft, and it certainly creates an impressive bang!

Glen says that he has seen 20 tons required to separate some hubs.

 

Ian Cornish

Hi Ian

 

Never thought of reversing the castle nut to bring full bearing area to the press cylinder, good idea! but otherwise as per glen's method.

Quite a bang ain't it? I was using my local garage's press, and when it went bang the one assistant mechanic came running in to see if something was wrong.

 

DAve

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Thanks for the suggestions,

I bought a pair of hubs after the studs pulled out of one of them, I replaced the failed one and have been trying to remove the other now and again ever since ( it was 16 years ago!!) so I'll get it done one day :) I'll grind through the hub along the line of the woodruff key.

I found with the other one that once you cut through some of the hub there'll be enough flex to pop it off.

Steve

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HI Roger

Exactly like mine to be able to pull the nut up to 125ft/lbs.

Or you could ask someone to hold their foot in the brake ! :)

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Or you could ask someone to hold their foot in the brake ! :)

 

...........and then you have to take her shopping, or for a drink and a meal, mow the lawn etc etc.

 

Easier to use a spanner.

 

Roger

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post-2177-0-40763600-1498385755_thumb.jpg

 

Pressure testing a radiator using a mountain bike inner tube cut and tie wrapped to the radiator connections and pumped up with a foot pump.

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attachicon.gifBalancer.JPG

 

Wire wheel balancing adaptor.

Hi Andrew,

Like minds..........

 

I did exactly the same thing.

Works very well once sorted for the particular balancing machine.

 

I also like the inner tube idea.

 

Roger

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...........and then you have to take her shopping, or for a drink and a meal, mow the lawn etc etc.

 

Easier to use a spanner.

 

Roger

Oh yea VERY costly advice on my part. Should know better ! ;)

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Andrew and Roger

 

Mine is the same but it is fixed to a free standing frame I put on the bench, then put a wheel up for cleaning the spokes etc./ back and front, Also good for static wheel balance test taken at 12 positions around the wheel using the nozzle for the points.

 

Dave

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Advice please. Fabric roof / tonneau.c

I am thinking of attaching (welding) one of the roof dot fastener, cup and punch to the jaws of a G clamp to give better control of the riveting action. Has anyone done this? Will it work? Will it work better?

 

 

Alan

Edited by barkerwilliams

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Hi Alan,

tell us how you get on as i was thinking of doing thew same - I was thinking of using a mole wrench

 

Roger

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Advice please. Fabric roof / tonneau.c

I am thinking of attaching (welding) one of the roof dot fastener, cup and punch to the jaws of a G clamp to give better control of the riveting action. Has anyone done this? Will it work? Will it work better?

 

 

Alan

Probably better to do it to a pair of Mole grips

Stuart.

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I done it with a small G Clamp,I cut the Floating Pad off and Drilled and Tapped the longer part,I glued the Cup to the flat of the Clamp and made up a better Lever for Tighting and Loosening the Clamp

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Rhine's request (http://www.tr-register.co.uk/forums/index.php?/topic/62608-tr6-pushrods-anyone/&do=findComment&comment=536155) reminded me of these - dummy cam follower-cum-pushrods for timing the camshaft.

Two hard wood dowels, wrapped in insulating tape to slide smoothly in the cam follower bores.

Pop dial guages on top and it's even easier to do "Equal lift on overlap"

 

John

post-535-0-80820300-1498513949_thumb.jpg

Edited by john.r.davies

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