Jump to content
Forum software update now live Read more... ×
qkingston

TR4a rebuild & improvements

Recommended Posts

Now I know I have seen similar topics somewhere before, but my searches have not found them. I am nearly at the body off phase of the full TR4a restoration and LHD to RHD conversion. What improvements would members recommend are worth doing for a standard road car (no racing/showing planned). I want to keep the car looking original, but not to the point of dismissing sensible improvements for safety or reliability reasons. I plan to use the chassis strengthening mods and add overdrive for starters, but what else would be on the priority list?

 

Much appreciated

 

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Electric fan, narrow belt and alternator.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi David,

 

There's a weakness in the front lower wishbone mounting bracket that's worth checking and fixing. The issue is that the original bracket was held on by a single stud. General advice is to update to the later two stud bracket. Item #100 here:

 

https://www.moss-europe.co.uk/shop-by-model/triumph/tr2-4a/steering-suspension/front-suspension/front-suspension-tr4a.html

 

Cheers,

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

kick out the bellows thermostat and use a wax thermostat,

also kick out the metal fan and use a BMW 1602/1802 fan,

Do not switch over to alu radiator, no uprated water pump, no alternator, no high torque electric starter, no electric petrol pump, no uprated coil springs, no 123.

That's all not needed

Edited by Z320

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also weakness at the chassis rear...diff mount, cross member, and rear chassis cross tube.

I would look at beefing up these areas as the 4A chassis rear has some flex and twist....eg. I would replace the rear cross tube [which does nothing apart from a body fixing point] with a much more substantial crosspiece welded in, keeping in mind the need for exhaust pipe placement.

When you say no departure from original, I guess that means the engine bay contents remain as is, if not there are a few items there,

You may be able to find a period look brake booster.

I am not a fan of wire wheels due to safety concerns.....a friend of mine was killed when a wire wheel collapsed.

Make provision for cockpit roll bar fixing bolts, and lap/sash safety belt anchoring points.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there is also Roger's mod to the handbrake fulcrums in the rear hubs to gain a bit of extra leverage, and effectiveness.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Jim,

you are too kind.

Mine were a mod of a previously original idea. But worth doing.

 

The ones normally on Ebay are not there now !!

 

Roger

Edited by RogerH

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

kick out the bellows thermostat and use a wax thermostat,

also kick out the metal fan and use a BMW 1602/1802 fan,

Do not switch over to alu radiator, no uprated water pump, no alternator, no high torque electric starter, no electric petrol pump, no uprated coil springs, no 123.

That's all not needed

Agree with most of above, but an alternator is a worthwhile improvement IMO.

 

Bob.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And the ultimate modification for safety which is totally unseen but has your back ( literally)...fit an alloy rear cockpit firewall.

 

A sheet of alloy ( 2 mm, in 3 pieces) which fits behind the rear seat fibre board, pop riveted into position situated upon a seal of intumescent sealer ( it swells in contact with heat), it will help prevent 10 gallons of burning fuel flowing through and around the fibreboard and crisping you and yours if the worst happens ( and it sometimes does). Costs about £60 ish pounds from many of the competition minded TR specialists, and takes about 3 hours to fit.

 

Mick Richards

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The main improvements I made during my 4A restoration were:

 

All the chassis strengthening improvements

Poly bush suspension

Alternator & narrow fan belt conversion

Revotec electric fan

Reversing lights wired to an extra gearbox switch

Improved heater ( Clayton internals in the original housing)

Revington suspension conversion.

 

In retrospect lever arm dampers would probably be ok for a standard road spec car. All the others come highly recommended though!

 

Jeff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys, much appreciated

 

Rgds

 

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The main improvements I made during my 4A restoration were:

 

All the chassis strengthening improvements

Poly bush suspension

Alternator & narrow fan belt conversion

Revotec electric fan

Reversing lights wired to an extra gearbox switch

Improved heater ( Clayton internals in the original housing)

Revington suspension conversion.

 

In retrospect lever arm dampers would probably be ok for a standard road spec car. All the others come highly recommended though!

 

Jeff

Would agree on the electric fan but not on the make. My experience with their switches is that they are junk.

 

The Revington coil over shock conversion will require the spring hangers to be reinforced to accommodate the shocker loads. Personally would go with one of the bolt on kits tat take the shocker loads to the chassis and have an additional bolt hole to link to the inner arches which helps to hold the body more rigidly on the chassis. These tend to go with longer shockers with a greater range of movement and transmit the load further out on the trailing arm which is where it was designed to take the load. The oil over is nearer the fulcrum and means more force through a shorter range of movement.

 

Definitely go with the alternator conversion and with it the thin belt conversion - the wide ones are less reliable and a pain to change.

 

HID or LED headlight bulbs - I know there are debates over legality but set up properly they are fine and you get the safety of modern lights rather than basic halogens or even worse original sealed beam glow worms. LEDs have come on a long way but are they reliable? The HIDs are but only go for 30w and not the 55w ones if you do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Electric fan, narrow belt and alternator.

+1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alternator, otherwise the lights go out when you back off approaching a corner at night :huh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alternator, otherwise the lights go out when you back off approaching a corner at night :huh:

Make that an Uprated one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Change or rebuild the driveshafts. Uprated stub axles are essential. Nothing worse than completing a full rebuild and then having a wheel fall off and pitch you into the scenery.

 

Dual circuit brakes.

 

Mk 1 MX5 seats with speakers in the headrests.

 

VERY LOUD HORNS. ( TRs are small by todays standards).

 

Alternator. ( Allows you to run a smaller lighter cheaper battery too)( and really BIG horns!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys, Rockie I think you're trying to say something about horns...as in a bull bar :) most be an outback thing!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not so much an outback thing for an urban dweller like me, more that wonderful feeling of travelling on an 8 lane motorway in the TR and gazing at the truck wheel nuts at head level. Nice to have some means of letting them know that you are there.

 

Sad to see that the UK is being further infected with the SUV/ute plague. The best selling vehicle in Oz is the Toyota Hilux. It is a scary feeling to sit beside one in traffic in the TR and note that the bumper is at the level of your head. At least it will be quick.

 

Look forward to following your progress.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And what are the views on Polybushes vs original rubber type, do the stiffer bushes not transmit greater shock loads onto the suspension fixings? And If Polybushes, what make preferred for normal road use?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The current rubber offerings dont tend to last so Poly is generally preferred, Blue being for normal road use. I buy mine from Chris Witor https://www.superflex.co.uk/

Stuart.

Edited by stuart

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Stuart, and is that poly all round? I've seen some comments about some poly and some rubber

 

Rgds

 

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, qkingston said:

Thanks Stuart, and is that poly all round? I've seen some comments about some poly and some rubber

 

Rgds

 

David

Thats for IRS diff mounts, I cant remember which way round but its Poly and rubber for either front or rear, Im sure someone will remember.

Stuart.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×