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10 minutes ago, DavidBee said:

Bolted on to the mechanical fuel pump blanking plate (using a bracket)?

No David that was too low I did a longer bracket off the original coil Mountings slightly bent out from the block. 

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Nope, added a strip of steel under the original coil mounting holes,  extending to the rear with 2 more holes for the 2nd coil. Bob. (exactly the same as Hamish - great minds etc !)

I don't think of all the extra holes in my TR as holes. I prefer to think of them as "lightening"...

Saw this on a 3A at a classic car event in France a few years ago.    

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22 minutes ago, Hamish said:

No David that was too low I did a longer bracket off the original coil Mountings slightly bent out from the block. 

Clever! Worth emulating — also, avoids drilling more holes in inner wing.

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Nope, added a strip of steel under the original coil mounting holes,  extending to the rear with 2 more holes for the 2nd coil.

Bob.

(exactly the same as Hamish - great minds etc !)

Edited by Lebro
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A coil is a must in these days of rubbish (sorry, mainly unreliable) parts. Mine's fitted as shown at the front of the wheel arch with both smaller wires connected sheathed and tied up and ready for a swap over. I made the HT long enough to reach. If the coil goes your car stops in just a few yards (it happened to me on the A1) and hence I think it a must. Oh, and the spanners, hammers, and anything you can comfortably fit in along with your luggage at the time.

James

pic 1.jpg

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I thought that heat from the block may have a detrimental effect on the coil and therefore best to have the spare on the inner wing.

Alan.

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14 hours ago, DavidBee said:

Clever! Worth emulating — also, avoids drilling more holes in inner wing.

I don't think of all the extra holes in my TR as holes. I prefer to think of them as "lightening"...

:P

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16 hours ago, Lebro said:

Nope, added a strip of steel under the original coil mounting holes,  extending to the rear with 2 more holes for the 2nd coil.

Bob.

(exactly the same as Hamish - great minds etc !)

Down there for dancing Bob :D

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3 hours ago, AlanG said:

I thought that heat from the block may have a detrimental effect on the coil and therefore best to have the spare on the inner wing.

Alan.

Yes. the preferred fitting is two side by side on the inner wing.

Stuart.

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3 minutes ago, Jase said:

This looks quite impressive to keep everything together:

https://naturalman.uk.com/products/leather-tool-bag?_pos=1&_sid=8e7433001&_ss=r

The original TR tool set came, I believe, in a black vinyl tool roll. Not sure I'd pay £125 for a leather one, although I did used to have a canvas equivalent. It wasn't very successful as the tools tended to slide out of it onto the road when I took it out of the boot.

Nigel

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Posted (edited)

I used to use an old cotton blanket tied up, worked well. I'm being asked what I would like for Father's day. Got to the age where I only want something if I can use it :) 

Edited by Jase
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Tool kit includes: Screwdrivers, pliers (regular, long nose, side cutters) AF spanner set and a couple of adjustable and Mole grips. Brake pipe clamp. 3/8 imperial socket set (unlike Tom I can’t justify a £300 Bluepoint set to live in the boot). Wire, terminals. Fuel and spare hoses. Jubilee clips. Spare coil and ignition unit, king lead long plug lead spare plug. Bars leaks. Foot pump. Clutch slave repair kit. Multimeter. Brake fluid and hack saw blade holder. Dizzy cap and rotor arm. Feeler guages  although not sure these are going to be match use with electronic ignition and haven’t seen action in years) Insulation tape.

In the 6 I also carry a metering unit drive dog and a couple of injector leads (no1 & 2). Spare injector and foot pump with cut down air bed adaptor for blowing out blocked injectors. (Most supposedly knackered injectors just have a bit of debris stuck) Spare Bosh pump (been loaned out a few times)  Use the 6 for the long continental trips so can coordinate carrying some spares like water pump and alternator)

Don't carry much in the Stag but grab the tool box and  from the 6 when going away in it. The Stag tool kit consists of 5l of coolant although hopeful that should go now I have an electric water pump. 

I take the view that if you are on a short journey you can do a quick fix or get the RAC to bring you home. (Or if it’s close to home there’s a tow bar on The Stag although that option has only been used once as Her Majesty doesn’t like towing ) On a longer holiday a more major repair can be worth doing  to carry on in the car.

 

 

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19 minutes ago, signalredshaker said:

Mon Dieu! Absolutleyment formidable. unfortument son un petite quantité tooles misingament!;)...

James

 

Nah, he’s just showing off..... agree though shame some have gone missing.....

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I am a fan of the approach of carrying just a few tools and obvious spares (points, wire, lucar connectors) unless you're going a really long, multi-day trip.

If you drive your TR often enough, most of the little, niggling problems will soon get fixed and very few actually stop you getting home - and that's what the AA, RAC or similar are for. 

I have a small tool kit with the spanners and screwdrivers as mentioned, plus a gapping tool and electric wire tool (stripping, crimping). If you need more than that, your day trip is already ruined - call for a tow home. 

If you're going on a long, multi-day European jaunt or something, that's a different matter and I have a trusted list.  But it's long. 

Drive it - that will tell you more than anything else. 

Tim

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Hi all

The spare coil in the engine is a rally / race thing, but if you’re going to carry one it’s sensible to put it somewhere quick to change in the event of a failure.

That said, failures these days seem less frequent in my experience, but much more prone to a block mounted coil because if engine temperatures. Unleaded fuel burns hotter for example. Putting the spare coil on the inner wing is a better idea, you just need to make sure the king lead and wires are long enough to enable a quick swap. The factory rally TR4’s had both coils on the inner wing, with a long king lead and extended power and earth wires.

regards

Tony

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51 minutes ago, TR4Tony VC said:

Hi all

The spare coil in the engine is a rally / race thing, but if you’re going to carry one it’s sensible to put it somewhere quick to change in the event of a failure.

That said, failures these days seem less frequent in my experience, but much more prone to a block mounted coil because if engine temperatures. Unleaded fuel burns hotter for example. Putting the spare coil on the inner wing is a better idea, you just need to make sure the king lead and wires are long enough to enable a quick swap. The factory rally TR4’s had both coils on the inner wing, with a long king lead and extended power and earth wires.

regards

Tony

I've read more than once that a big factor in coils failing is actually the spec/condition of the HT leads. It's to do with impedance, apparently. I'm not sure if a "good" HT leads set means an expensive one, but I tend not to scrimp on those.

But I do also have a spare coil on the inner wing just in case, and all leads long enough to reach it.

I also was advised to use a beefier condenser than the standard one, mounted in-line externally from the distributor, again to reduce the likelihood of heat-induced failure.

Nigel

 

 

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I picked up one of these about four years ago. Great bit of kit. 

The ElectroStart battery-less jump starter

SeaEle1.thumb.jpg.aad4f7f66ca969e6723de63853e75863.jpg

Sod's Law, if your battery's going to die, it's going to die at the worst time and in the worst location. No-one to hook a jump lead to, no phone reception for breakdown recovery, and little to no sympathy from the lady staring at you under arched eyebrows from the passenger seat. :ph34r:

This however will get you on the road, and with any luck, out of the dog house. :)

Cheers, Deggers

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The late John Soffe used to have a spare coil on his inner wing.

However he overlooked changing the one that failed so kept swapping them over on one of the longer trips ever so often as they overheated and conked out!

 

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1 hour ago, Deggers said:

I picked up one of these about four years ago. Great bit of kit. 

The ElectroStart battery-less jump starter

SeaEle1.thumb.jpg.aad4f7f66ca969e6723de63853e75863.jpg

Sod's Law, if your battery's going to die, it's going to die at the worst time and in the worst location. No-one to hook a jump lead to, no phone reception for breakdown recovery, and little to no sympathy from the lady staring at you under arched eyebrows from the passenger seat. :ph34r:

This however will get you on the road, and with any luck, out of the dog house. :)

Cheers, Deggers

Have you used it in anger?

You wonder how much energy it can store in two minutes charging and if that would be enough for more than a few seconds cranking?

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16 hours ago, Andy Moltu said:

Have you used it in anger?

On several occasions Andy. Works like a charm.

As they say, it doesn't need to be kept charged (unlike battery Power Packs). Keep it in the boot and forget about it until you need it.

Here's a video of a similar starter, in real time :

(No link to the company, just a happy customer.)

Cheers, Deggers

Edited by Deggers
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Clever, it must have an inverter circuit inside to boost the input voltage to 14 volts, which it then uses to charge an array of "super capacitors".

Still amazed it can supply enough current to start a car though.

Bob.

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21 hours ago, signalredshaker said:

Mon Dieu! Absolutleyment formidable. unfortument son un petite quantité tooles misingament!;)...

James

From recollection they were in use at the time...constructing the Barbecue!

Miles

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