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Ian Vincent

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Everything posted by Ian Vincent

  1. It’s not too difficult if you ask the machine/ engineering shop to do some of the tricky bits. I got the shop to do all the bits that Bob had his do plus I asked them to remove the plugs in the crankshaft, clean it and replace plus do the same with the block so that I was just left to put it all back together. Checking on the way! Rgds Ian
  2. Alternatively go to a ship's chandler and buy a marine one. Rgds Ian
  3. it'll be a hell of a fan if it does. Rgds Ian
  4. Does it matter for a road car? If the pistons are decked to the block then they will be a maximum of 5 thou down which increases the swept volume by less than 0.5% and the combustion volume by approximately 1.2%. Is that material? Rgds Ian
  5. FWIW, when I as rebulding my TR3a none of the regular suppliers had any standard springs available so I ended up with Revington's Rally Spec ones - they have been fine. Not too harsh at all. Rgds Ian
  6. I wouldn't want to use it. Too clean, I'd be scared I would damage the surface. Rgds Ian
  7. My pistons had to be decked as well Bob, but I got the machine shop to do it. After all, they had the block, liners and crankshaft, I just provided a new set of FO8 seals and the pistons and conrods. They sourced new shells for the bearings and checked and skimmed the pistons. Rgds Ian
  8. But you still have the aggro of removing the front of the car to change the camshaft. Rgds Ian
  9. Look for a Bosch Blue Coil, or a red one but then you need a ballast resistor. They do turn up occasionally on Ebay. I reckon they will give you as much spark as a Flamethrower. Rgds Ian Here is a link to what appears to be a genuine Made in Germany one. Bosch Blue Coil
  10. I'm not expecting a significant change in performance, just as long as the oil leaks are at least diminished. Rgds Ian
  11. I have finally completed the task of replacing the rebuilt engine (and gearbox although that hasn't been rebuilt) in my TR3a and it does seem like a mammoth task, particularly when working in a single garage with minimal side clearance. And what a pig of a job to finish with, replacing the gearbox tunnel. Many years ago when I was working in Australia I remember a phrase from one of their motoring magazines that went along the lines of, "If the Poms made their cars any more difficult to fix, we wouldn't bother. We'd throw them away and buy a new one". The comment was directed at a Land
  12. The most common areas for a water leak in my experience (apart from the radiator) are at the hose connections, principally the supply hose from the bottom of the radiator up to the water pump. This is made up of two kinked rubber (or silicon) hoses and a length of steel tube. Getting the hoses to seal on the steel tube can be an issue, you need decent hose clips. I'm sure others will be along soon to suggest the water pump etc., but touch wood that hasn't been a problem. Rgds Ian
  13. That's where mine came from. I was guided that way by Carl who is one of their mechanics and has rebuilt loads of TR engines in his time. Rgds Ian
  14. Hi Bob, My view only but if you are spending a few bob on the rebuild and you are only planning to do it once, you need to do it right. The cost of a new set of springs is small beer in the overall scheme of things. I have TR4a springs running in a TR3a head and with 3/8” dia exhaust valves. I have a Newman PH1 cam with their followers and it all seems to work together. Rgds Ian
  15. I don’t see why not, you just need a set of the later springs for dimension purposes. After all you can buy alloy caps if you want extra bling so the strength required can’t be an issue. Rgds Ian
  16. I haven’t done a comparison but they have different part numbers. 105803 for the TR3 and 142137 for the later cars. Rgds Ian
  17. You definitely don't want the third spring when you are using a Newman PH1 cam. If you do use it, you will almost certainly get coil binding on your exhaust valves. That is why I went for the TR4a valve springs and I picked up a set of S/H TR4a spring caps for not a lot of money from Revington. Rgds Ian
  18. FWIW I went for the same springs as you Peter, TR4a ones. They are quite soft but not a problem for me because I don't rev the engine hard. It has plenty of low down torque and delivers all the grunt I need at quite modest revs. Rgds Ian
  19. Hi Peter, I’m not querying the rocker ratio, that is what it is but I was querying your calculation of the cam load. if you take moments about the point of rotation, the force on the short side multiplied by the length of that side must be equal to the force on the long side multiplied by the force on that side. So if one side is 1.5 times longer than the other, the force on the other side must be 1.5 times greater. Rgds Ian
  20. Just looking at your post Peter. If you have a cam ratio of 1.5:1 you need more shove at the pushrod end to achieve whatever you are trying to deliver at the valve end so whatever your valve spring compression force is, multiply by 1.5 for cam bearing pressure. And similarly, if your cam has .280" lift that translates to 0.420" at the business end. Rgds Ian
  21. Even if a vaccine is only 60% effective it represents a reduction in risk for whoever has it. That has to be a good thing and it doesn’t mean that you immediately have to go out and hug a stranger. Rgds Ian
  22. I might (stress the word 'might') have one in the garage that you can get rebuilt, if I've got one it will be minus its capilliary tube. Do you want me to have a look? Rgds Ian
  23. I agree with Bob. When I rebuilt my car and converted it from LHD to RHD I acquired a S/H dashboard which was ready drilled for overdrive in the position Bob recommends. Initially I thought about moving the switch but I use one of the original egg style switches and it falls beautifully to hand. Rgds Ian
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