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1 hour ago, aardvark said:

Steve, from memory 50 inches.  You definitely won’t have enough room with a 9 foot garage.  My garage is 3.6m wide.  I put the car on dollies and push it to one side, then man handle the really heavy tilting lift into place into the centre of the garage whilst trying not to drop it on the car,  then push the car back over it.  I only just have enough space to do this. 
 

My view of it is that it is good once you have it in place, but the hassle for my size garage isn’t something I regularly want to do more than once a year.  If I had the money then a proper drive on scissor lift is what I would go for.

 

cheers

 

dave

Thanks Dave.

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If you have the headroom I would go for a 4 post lift with sliding “crossbars” for when you need to have the wheels off. Some come with drip trays so can be used to park another car underneath. I have a 2 post but when I (hopefully) get planning the new house will have a Worksop with a 4 post lift.

Two post lifts are ok but you need clearance to get the bars under which can be a problem and you end up jacking up low cars like ours to get them on the lift. On a 4 post to do an oil change you just drive on and lift. On a two post you drive in, swing the lift arms in place and lift (possibly jacking up at either or both ends to get the arms under) This becomes more of a pain each time you do it.

If you don’t have the head room you may need to look at scissor lifts and the like.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Mick Forey said:

I would also recommend a 4 post lift but you need headroom if you want it to go up to full height.

Mick

Workshop, lift and TR6.jpg

Hi Mick, I have a four post almost identical to your's only my garage is not as long. Don't you find it a drag lifting the ramps on and off to allow the car onto the ramp! they a very heavy. i have thought about trying to hinge them someway but not found a solution yet.

Paul

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Paul, I have occasionally forgotten to lift them off and they just go up with the ramps, not clever really. Hinging would be much better like the much more expensive lifts.

Mick

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Mick, Mine have the added problem of my grage being shorter they stick out past the door edge!. So I have to take them off even when ramp is down. oh well the benefits greatly outway this minor drag.

 

Paul

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19 hours ago, aardvark said:

Steve, from memory 50 inches.  You definitely won’t have enough room with a 9 foot garage.  My garage is 3.6m wide.  I put the car on dollies and push it to one side, then man handle the really heavy tilting lift into place into the centre of the garage whilst trying not to drop it on the car,  then push the car back over it.  I only just have enough space to do this. 
 

My view of it is that it is good once you have it in place, but the hassle for my size garage isn’t something I regularly want to do more than once a year.  If I had the money then a proper drive on scissor lift is what I would go for.

 

cheers

 

dave

When its fully down is it too high to drive over?

Stuart.

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3 hours ago, Harbottle said:

Mine have the added problem of my grage being shorter they stick out past the door edge!. So I have to take them off even when ramp is down. oh well the benefits greatly outway this minor drag.

I had the same lift installed in my previous garage and had the same issue as yours. Haha. So when building this one, fortunately, I had the space to add a bit extra on garage length. Sadly, I could not increase the width due to a very large Seven Trent owned storm drain that runs down the edge of the property. I had to negotiate the build-over permit down from the standard 3m clearance to 1.2m just to build the garage at all. Plus take videos of the drain before and after the build - anybody want to see some dirty videos?

 

3 hours ago, aardvark said:

What is the width of your garage Mick and whose lift do you have installed?  It looks mint!!

Dave, the inside width is 4m, 8m length and 4m high at the apex. It was nearly 3.5m internal width, which would be fine. It was designed around the lift with the TR6 on the top of the lift with the bonnet open. This another bit of learning from the previous garage where the height was 0.5m less and I raised the lift without closing the bonnet. Dummy.

The lift came from The Netherlands in 2007 at a cost of £1400 delivered. It is now more widely available and is very similar to this: https://www.automotechservices.co.uk/products/as-4t36-mobile-4-post-parking-lift/ Sadly mine had no optional jacking beam which I much regret and I wish I could find one that fits my lift. I use the strong cross beam and two bottle jacks.

The photo was taken just after the lift, cupboards and racking were installed, before I started using it. It looks a lot more messy now, particularly the floor. The TRs have left their spoor.

Mick

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1 hour ago, stuart said:

When its fully down is it too high to drive over?

Stuart.

It’s too high (which is why Jeff has the timber ramps in place), and it’s too wide to drive over (see the arrowed parts in the photo below).  It has to be pushed under the car from the side.  So you need a garage which is the width of your car with working space plus the width of the frame (so you can push it under the car from the side).

95A9C4B0-7E4A-4105-A491-DD974E1A14A6.jpeg

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19 minutes ago, Mick Forey said:

The lift came from The Netherlands in 2007 at a cost of £1400 delivered.

Mick, so did mine! Only in blue(Great minds think alike) I have managed to buy a secondhand jacking beam from an old mot garage who was upgrading.

Paul

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          Fitting a Doretti body to the chassis using a 4 post lift. They are often available cheaply from MOT garages who are upgrading or closing down. This one has longitudinal beams so the bed can be lowered giving great access to the sills and suspension but I usually use a transverse jacking beam to get the wheels off the deck. One type has the hydraulic ram in one leg and this needs more headroom while the other has the ram in the bed so all legs are a fixed height.

          Cheers Richard

DSCN2140 (1).JPG

DSCN1873 (1).JPG

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On 1/8/2021 at 9:34 PM, Motorsport Mickey said:

And my Strongman Clifton scissor lift was a used item from E bay via Strongman for £545, nearly new but didn't have a hydraulic controller which I bought new separately from e bay for £130. Unit was bought like this 

1409636899_(KGrHqV!rEFJh5VGfp(BSZl989!g!60_12.jpg.cd9de0d9f50b6686cc9196fd97d3060a.jpg

and went into the floor... like this

P1010201.thumb.JPG.9f610da96990f8fdd654cdd8bb558cc5.JPG

A builder working on the house charged me £150 to dig out a square 110mm deep (total original concrete depth was just 150mm) into the concrete and then another 150mm concrete with steel cage reinforcement below that. A little home handyman timber framing by me between the ramps allowed me to make it a flush floor between ramps (walking only non load bearing). 

It's a restricted height scissor which lifts to 1 metre and I don't need more because of overhead beams etc. It has the 820mm between the ramps which allows unhindered down car access especially useful for engine gearbox and diff work. There are a number of scissor lifts which have a ram placed in the centre which are cheaper but restricts access, the 820mm means the rear of the chassis will sit on the ramp (just) but a crossbeam needs placing across the ramps at the front to allow placement of the lifting rubber doughnuts there. My garage is single car width and there is 22 inches spare either side of the ramp up to the wall, a TR width fits down the ramps about in the centre.

Mick Richards  

That looks a really great installation, I was looking at the cheaper ramp with the central rams but I’m swaying (see what I did there? ) towards one like yours now .  Looks a lot more stable and easier to park the car over . 
Did you set your ramps to that width btw or is it fixed . Spec seems to say it can be adjusted but I can’t see how from the pics . 
I think I’ll keep a look out for a good used model like yours.  
thanks :)

Dave 

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11 hours ago, Trumpy said:

Spec seems to say it can be adjusted but I can’t see how from the pics

Hi Dave, if it is like mine the two ramps are fixed at both ends by two bolts. These can be moved a little to adjust width.

Paul

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14 hours ago, Trumpy said:

That looks a really great installation, I was looking at the cheaper ramp with the central rams but I’m swaying (see what I did there? ) towards one like yours now .  Looks a lot more stable and easier to park the car over . 
Did you set your ramps to that width btw or is it fixed . Spec seems to say it can be adjusted but I can’t see how from the pics . 
I think I’ll keep a look out for a good used model like yours.  
thanks :)

Dave 

Hi Dave,

Not sure about whether the ramps can be disconnected from the crosstubes and the width available between the ramps reduced. For me one of the advantages of the Strongman Clifton is the 820mm between the ramps, it's a very useful space for downcar access and servicing/removing of components, if you could take maybe 300mm out of the overall width of the scissor unit you could use the rubber lifting blocks directly on the ramps to the vehicle chassis but at the cost of worsening the access considerably. It's easier and better for access to use a couple of cross beams laid onto the ramps and place the rubber lifting blocks on there, with them being movable it's easier and still allows full width access anywhere down the vehicle length. Here's a photo with a TR6 mounted on a Automotech scissor lift,

 

DSCF4471-1280.thumb.jpg.9dfbe08f94522ab08b5eae67be067074.jpg

This lift is almost identical to the Strongman (same downcar width between ramps) and with the same advantages of twin hydraulic cylinders (one on each ramp) mounted on swivel knuckles that allow the ramps to lift vertically rather than the single ram central lift which needs the scissor action to travel the feet on one of the ramps down the car length...which lifts the car forward as well as upwards. Whether they can be adjusted on width I don't know, but as you can see the IRS cars 4a/5/6 will allow the mounting of the chassis onto the ramp and just uses the moveable crossmember at the front.  

Mick Richards  

Edited by Motorsport Mickey
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4 hours ago, Motorsport Mickey said:

Hi Dave,

Not sure about whether the ramps can be disconnected from the crosstubes and the width available between the ramps reduced. For me one of the advantages of the Strongman Clifton is the 820mm between the ramps, it's a very useful space for downcar access and servicing/removing of components, if you could take maybe 300mm out of the overall width of the scissor unit you could use the rubber lifting blocks directly on the ramps to the vehicle chassis but at the cost of worsening the access considerably. It's easier and better for access to use a couple of cross beams laid onto the ramps and place the rubber lifting blocks on there, with them being movable it's easier and still allows full width access anywhere down the vehicle length. Here's a photo with a TR6 mounted on a Automotech scissor lift,

 

DSCF4471-1280.thumb.jpg.9dfbe08f94522ab08b5eae67be067074.jpg

This lift is almost identical to the Strongman (same downcar width between ramps) and with the same advantages of twin hydraulic cylinders (one on each ramp) mounted on swivel knuckles that allow the ramps to lift vertically rather than the single ram central lift which needs the scissor action to travel the feet on one of the ramps down the car length...which lifts the car forward as well as upwards. Whether they can be adjusted on width I don't know, but as you can see the IRS cars 4a/5/6 will allow the mounting of the chassis onto the ramp and just uses the moveable crossmember at the front.  

Mick Richards  

Have just purchased the same lift and it is great, but you definitely need the steel box section.. It is also correct that it goes pretty much straight up. I have lifted a car that is only 1 inch shorter than the garage and all went well. You do need ensure that you have the correct circuit breakers as it pulls a fair few amps. I also put some blocks at the front for the front wheels to stop on.. Means there is then enough gap between the chassis and lift to place the rubber blocks.

Have to say it is very nice just to lift the car so that you are not crouching, even for simple things like changing headlamp bulbs. Although my wife thinks working on the car is like Yoga for me and keeps me flexible :-)

Tim

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10 hours ago, Motorsport Mickey said:

Hi Dave,

Not sure about whether the ramps can be disconnected from the crosstubes and the width available between the ramps reduced. For me one of the advantages of the Strongman Clifton is the 820mm between the ramps, it's a very useful space for downcar access and servicing/removing of components, if you could take maybe 300mm out of the overall width of the scissor unit you could use the rubber lifting blocks directly on the ramps to the vehicle chassis but at the cost of worsening the access considerably. It's easier and better for access to use a couple of cross beams laid onto the ramps and place the rubber lifting blocks on there, with them being movable it's easier and still allows full width access anywhere down the vehicle length. Here's a photo with a TR6 mounted on a Automotech scissor lift,

 

DSCF4471-1280.thumb.jpg.9dfbe08f94522ab08b5eae67be067074.jpg

This lift is almost identical to the Strongman (same downcar width between ramps) and with the same advantages of twin hydraulic cylinders (one on each ramp) mounted on swivel knuckles that allow the ramps to lift vertically rather than the single ram central lift which needs the scissor action to travel the feet on one of the ramps down the car length...which lifts the car forward as well as upwards. Whether they can be adjusted on width I don't know, but as you can see the IRS cars 4a/5/6 will allow the mounting of the chassis onto the ramp and just uses the moveable crossmember at the front.  

Mick Richards  

Hi Mick 

thanks for the reply .

My issue is that i have  an Austin 7 as well as the Tr5 ,  both which need to fit the ramps .  .  The 7 has 900mm between the wheels and would be a bit tight on the ramps, about 700mm is good for both.   . 

I had a chat with a guy at Strongman today.  He said that the lift was a fixed width, 820 between the ramps as yours is but it seems the only thing holding the ramps together is a flat plate that bolts onto the front moving arms.  (This updated model is slightly different to yours although the flat plate moves up with the ramp and must get in the way !)   Also no more stock until end of Feb !  

Anyway i suggested that this bolt on plate could simply be cut down to whatever width was required , he replied something about warranty and certification but it really makes no difference to the integrity of the lift .   

I have however now found an almost identical lift from 'Liftech' but with 700mm between the ramps so that looks like my perfect lift !  And slightly cheaper .   Hopefully these will be in stock . 

Dave

     

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10 hours ago, Trumpy said:

 

I have however now found an almost identical lift from 'Liftech' but with 700mm between the ramps so that looks like my perfect lift !  And slightly cheaper .   Hopefully these will be in stock . 

Dave

     

Looking at their site apparently sold out too.

Stuart.

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The photo was taken just after the lift, cupboards and racking were installed, before I started using it. It looks a lot more messy now, particularly the floor. The TRs have left their spoor.

Mick

Hi Mick,

be nice to see a current photo, make all us mere mortals feel a tad better.

John.

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19 minutes ago, John Morrison said:

The photo was taken just after the lift, cupboards and racking were installed, before I started using it. It looks a lot more messy now, particularly the floor. The TRs have left their spoor.

Mick

Hi Mick,

be nice to see a current photo, make all us mere mortals feel a tad better.

John.

Yeah...show us all the grime and accumulated detritus that is plonked into garages.

Mick Richards

 

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Having perhaps bought the last Strongman lift before they ran out of stock I suspect I have the most recent model.

To me you could easily narrow it but you would have to reduce the width of not only the flat plate (known as the torsion bar on their part manifest) and also the cross strut at the front that keeps the ramps parallel.

Should be a simple case of cutting and rewelding. 

Tim

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On 1/11/2021 at 9:18 AM, Harbottle said:

Hi Dave, if it is like mine the two ramps are fixed at both ends by two bolts. These can be moved a little to adjust width.

Paul

Hi Paul ,

I phoned Stongman and they confirm the ramps are set to the width. , 820mm between ramps.  However i think it would be very easy to shorten the connecting /torsion bar and achieve what ever width was required .  

Be better if it was a second hand one though as it will undoubtedly invalidate the warranty . 

 

 

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