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jogger321

Winterising... What do you do?

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I'd love to drive my TR6 all year around in the UK however sadly I've decided to put her away at the end of this month till next spring because of the threat of rust caused by the stuff on the roads once the temp drops...

 

It's a 71 with fuel injection

 

What do you do with yours to make sure she is ready to jump in and go next April?

 

Do you start yours up periodically over the winter and just in and out of the garage to keep the hydraulics moving or do you just disconnect the battery, cover and leave?

 

Be interested to hear what works for you

 

 

 

 

 

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all i do is put marine grade stabilizer in the fuel (tank is full), close the fuel valve i have installed, and remove the battery so i can periodically charge it. the car is covered, of course and some moth balls in the interior.

 

i do not start it as you can not get it up to temperature just idling in the garage. if i am bored enough, i might remove the plugs and crank it over to get the oil pressure up but mine usually hibernates undisturbed until spring (unless there are projects but this is going to be a quiet winter...)

 

c74

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Nothing except inflate the tyres to about 40psi, and a bottle or two of millers tank safe. Run the engine until up to temperature then shut off walk away and forget about it for a few weeks after which I stick the battery charger on it for a couple of hours. Running the engine gets the tank safe all through the fuel system and any moisture in the crankcase evaporated. I don’t bother disconnecting the battery as it keeps the tracker alive.

It’s worked for me for the past three years.

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I park mine in a cair -o-port.

Fuel tank filled up

Hood up, rear window unzipped,

Door windows down .

Always a full service before winter storage.

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Each couple of years I change my antifreeze about now. Wait for a good sunny, breezy dry day and wash the car and blast any dirt from under the wheel arches and leave the car out for several hours to let it dry thoroughly. I empty out the screen wash bottle. I wax the car and spray all chrome work with a protection wax spray (£3.50) https://www.toolstation.com/shop/Automotive/d60/Lubricants+%26+Sprays/sd2795/Protection+Wax/p41925 and check the tyre pressure. I remove anything from the car that might smell good to a hungry mouse. I usually park with a full fuel tank.

I have a good sweep and tidy of the garage to remove any rubbish which might attract a mouse seeking winter quarters. Hood up the park the car as far back in the garage as I can get under a car cover. I ensure the cover is tucked up and not resting on the ground to allow climbing ladders for mice. I park in gear with the handbrake off. I disconnect the battery with the quick disconnect. Usually I leave the passenger and drivers windows open to encourage air circulation.

I try and remember every month or two to roll the car forwards a few inches to find a fresh bit of tyre to rest on. I probably charge the battery with an intelligent charger at that time until it shows charged, I do not leave on charge for extended periods. I usually start the car for a few minutes and have a cursory look around to ensure all is well.

 

 

Alan

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Get the weight off the tyres if you can and keep them in the dark.I guess that the suspension would be best left in its loaded position so the ideal solution may be to have it stood on an old set of wheels and tyres.

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Carry one driving it as much as possible once the roads are salted maybe less but once driven with salt on the roads hose underneath. Works for me over the last sixteen years.

 

Cheers

 

Mike

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98 octane petrol is also a lot less likely to go stale and improve your chances of a quick start in the spring

 

kc

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Can I ask whats the reason for a full petrol tank?

 

I thought our petrol went off ? And the e content was hydroscopic ?

 

Is it to reduce the amount of damp laden air ?

 

H

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Can I ask whats the reason for a full petrol tank?

 

I thought our petrol went off ? And the e content was hydroscopic ?

 

Is it to reduce the amount of damp laden air ?

 

H

Minimises air space above fuel so the amount of water carried in with each atmos pressure change is small. That small amount will disperse in the greater amounf of ethanol and wont separate.

Fuel contains corrosion inhibitors that will reduce rusting of the tank when covered with fuel.

The downside is there's 11 gallons of fuel to think forget about when working on the car....leaks, siphoning, sparks, etc

Peter

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When the windows were closed, mildew formed on the steering wheel, dash, etc. Now the windows are rolled down & no problem.

Run a dehumidifier occasionally to keep air dampness low.

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Hi Jogger,

I pop mine into the garage and give her a pat on the rear wing. :(

 

Next day I take her out and drive as normal. :)

 

This is repeated day after day until spring turns up then its business as usual. B)

 

Keep the underside dry if possible. Jet spray it clean if you have to.

 

Roger

Edited by RogerH

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Avoid running up to temp without using it as all this does is cause condensation in the engine, not good - only start it up if you intend to drive it, even if it's only a few miles to keep the wheels moving. That's all I've done for the last 35 years of TR ownership.

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I just try and use mine as much as possible, if the roads are in anyway salty it gets a pressure washer put underneath and a clean over before getting dried and put back in the garage. Roof is periodically put up and down every week or so. windows left mostly up, parked in gear with handbrake off, battery unhooked and a car cover over the top in a ventilated garage. To be honest winter treatment is the same as summer treatment.

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