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Spin On Oil Filter Conversion - which one?


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Having had engine oil dumped all over my drive after an oil change, I've decided to change from the Purolator oil filter for a spin on converter.  

Obviously, these are sold by all the usual suspects (Moss Europe, Rimmer, Revington, SC Parts, TRGB) but I'm not sure whether they are all selling the same bit of kit or if there any differences between  them and, if so, if any of them are recommended or to be avoided.

Thanks in advance for any feedback.

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17 minutes ago, Lebro said:

I suspect they are mostly the same, but have you read my article in TRaction about how to make them more reliably drip free.

Final draft Article on Improving spin-on oil filter adaptors 240618.pdf 1.18 MB · 1 download

Thanks Bob

Peter W

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Bob

What is the model number of the K&N filter shown in your article?

I have a shorter version, being a K&N version of teh one that came with the spin on kit and which is fine for now, but I would like to use a larger one on the next oil change

Regards

Phil

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Quote

K&N HP-2009

+1

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35 minutes ago, Tom Boyd said:

This....

 

http://www.cambridgemotorsport.com/partsxx/cm4255

 

Amazing bit of kit!!

Tom

It ought to be at that price but why bother with an oil cooler for road use. 

My spin on kit came from Moss some years ago and has never leaked, and it cost about £200 less! 

Chris

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+1 for both of those. The Moss one with a K&N HP2009 does the business for me too. 

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Just fitted the K&N filter. The engine no longer clatters on start up as oil pressure builds as was the case with the cheaper filters I used to use. Well worth the small extra cost.

Alan.

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I highly recommend that you remove the entire filter head as suggested in Bob's article. Installing the spin-on kit in much easier on the bench and you can clean the thing inside and out. The Moss kit requires  that the bolt be torqued to a rather low value. I didn't fancy doing that on my back with my old beam torque wrench. Replacing the PRV ball and spring while you are at it is a good idea too. The only drawback is that the gaskets currently available from Moss here in the States are thin paper and prone to leak. Much better to find an OEM red paper gasket, reuse a good original, or make one. New copper washers for the oil pressure take-off also a good idea, but mind which is which as they have different diameters.

PS My TR4A came with a Tecalemit filter head but I changed it out for an earlier Purolator head which has a better, thicker O-ring seal.

 

Edited by Andy303
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You'll want to re-anneal the copper washers for the oil pressure take-off before re-fitting to the block.  Large diameter towards the engine and small diameter to the outside.

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Thanks everyone for the helpful replies.  Will go for the Moss/K&N combo.  Seems like it may be a bit more involved than I had hoped.  Still, at least I have plenty of time at the moment, if not much talent ...

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On 4/2/2020 at 12:43 PM, peejay4A said:

You'll want to re-anneal the copper washers for the oil pressure take-off before re-fitting to the block.  Large diameter towards the engine and small diameter to the outside.

Hi,

Please can you clarify what you mean by this/what this involves.

Thanks,

Martin

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FWIW it doesn't have to be that involved. A lot of what Andy describes above is personal choice, not a necessity.

The kit can be fitted perfectly well in-situ without needing to remove the filter head from the car.  I don't recall it being that difficult to do.

I didn't see any need to replace the PRV components either as mine was working just fine.

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3 hours ago, martinp said:

Hi,

Please can you clarify what you mean by this/what this involves.

Thanks,

Martin

The copper washers need to be soft so that they deform slightly as you tighten the securing dome nut.  This ensures that it's oil tight.  Once they've been compressed by tightening the nut the copper work hardens and won't seal properly unless it's annealed again.  I would do it even if using new washers as you don't know if they're annealed or not.

To anneal the washers, heat them to cherry red then drop them in water.  That's it.

 

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On 4/8/2020 at 7:33 AM, RobH said:

FWIW it doesn't have to be that involved. A lot of what Andy describes above is personal choice, not a necessity.

The kit can be fitted perfectly well in-situ without needing to remove the filter head from the car.  I don't recall it being that difficult to do.

I didn't see any need to replace the PRV components either as mine was working just fine.

No it doesn't but I preferred having the entire assembly in my hands knowing that everything is clean and properly tight to doing the job laying on my back. There will be no doubt as to whether the entire old O-ring has been removed or not. Having it clean and tidy on the bench allowed me to carefully install the new o-ring in a clean and bright filter head groove with a  bit of sealer, and no worries about it falling back out on to the dirty floor. This joint seems to be the source of my leaks and frustration.

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