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angelfj

petrol and vacuum line support

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Despite our earnest attempt to doccument the detalis when we took the car to bits, seven years is a long time. If you look at the attached photo you will see two types of "thingy" that Triumph utilised to support the petrol and vacuum lines where they cross over at the front of the engine. Considering the point in production TS58276LO, which was assembled on 1 September 1959, which one of these "thingies" is correct for my car. I have not been able to find a listing or drawing of this part in the detailed parts catalog.

 

Many thanks,

 

Frank

Edited by angelfj

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Despite our earnest attempt to doccument the detalis when we took the car to bits, seven years is a long time. If you look at the attached photo you will see two types of "thingy" that Triumph utilised to support the petrol and vacuum lines where they cross over at the front of the engine. Considering the point in production TS58276LO, which was assembled on 1 September 1959, which one of these "thingies" is correct for my car. I have not been able to find a listing or drawing of this part in the detailed parts catalog.

 

Many thanks,

 

Frank

Frank Im pretty sure its the one on the right although Im sure Don will confirm.

Stuart

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My 1958 TR3A had another type of support. See photos.

 

On the very late 1960 TR3A (TS 81551 L) that we restored it had a support more like the one you show as a long cradle. But that was when my neighbour and my brother were finishing the restoration as I was still suffering from memory loss due to the chemo treatment I had been taking.

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I have the same as Don and my com. no. is 28874. It works well and is not obtrusive.

Good luck.Richard

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Despite our earnest attempt to doccument the detalis when we took the car to bits, seven years is a long time. If you look at the attached photo you will see two types of "thingy" that Triumph utilised to support the petrol and vacuum lines where they cross over at the front of the engine. Considering the point in production TS58276LO, which was assembled on 1 September 1959, which one of these "thingies" is correct for my car. I have not been able to find a listing or drawing of this part in the detailed parts catalog.

 

Many thanks,

 

Frank

 

I've seen the support shown on the right of your photo, I've also seen

the one posted by Don.

Perhaps both could be correct - I can imagine the one you show with a

rubber grommett would fail when the grommet failed.

 

I certainly recall the type shown by Don as being fitted to later TRs,

including 4s.

 

Does the parts book give any clues?

 

AlanR

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I've seen the support shown on the right of your photo, I've also seen

the one posted by Don.

Perhaps both could be correct - I can imagine the one you show with a

rubber grommet would fail when the grommet failed.

 

I certainly recall the type shown by Don as being fitted to later TRs,

including 4s.

 

Does the parts book give any clues?

 

AlanR

 

Thanks guys and NO there is naught in the parts book! Frankly, I like the one on the right of my photo because it has a separate grove for each of the lines.

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Hi frank

My car has the one on the right, it's an October 1960 build, but i can't vouch for the originality.

Steve

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Thanks guys and NO there is naught in the parts book!

Frankly, I like the one on the right of my photo because

it has a separate grove for each of the lines.

 

I would tend to agree with you if performance is the main criteria,

but I'm sure it's not original.

 

AlanR

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Hi Frank,

 

the clip on the right of your picture looks more like a TR4 clip - isn't it the one that holds the petrol pipe and clutch pipe together on the chassis rail ?

 

I can recall something like your circular clip on my old Doretti and 3A, as in the pipe went through a grommet in a bracket of some sort, you couldn't just unclip the pipe - it was threaded through. That's not to say that was original of course, I don't know what was original, but it was a nuisance. I can remember replacing it on both cars, with a clip - probably similar to the one you illustrate.

 

Cheers,

 

Alec

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I have the clip on the right, in the same place, on my early TR4 and it holds the fuel pipe and the metal advance/retard pipe.

Rod

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My November-1959 TR3A has something like the clip on the right of the photo. The car is all around very original, an even though the cylinder head comes from a TR4A, I do not believe that the PO changed that clip.

 

 

 

Jesus

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Frank,

My 59Tr3 (54132L- build date of June 12, 1959) has a support clip quite similar to the one on your left sans grommet.

Being the third owner and picked up the vehicle in 1970 after it sat in a garage for 4 years, I am pretty confident that it is the original piece.

 

R,

Mario

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I'm last again Frank but as usual Don is bang on the money I think, only the fuel pipe was clipped as in his photo.

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Interesting set of responses to the Fuel Pipe Clip.

 

During my research for the Moss catalogue fuel system pages of TR2-3, I could find no mention of clips for the fuel pipe to the thermostat housing. (that does not mean nothing was ever factory fitted though) Don's method with a 'P' clip is one I prefer, and use, where nothing has been fitted. TR 4/4A used the type where a rubber block has two moulded grooves and is fitted into a strip of bent metal. The other clip arrangement, a round rubber grommet fitted in a bracket I have seen on other Triumphs.

 

The secure clipping of the fuel pipe, I have to say, is important, when a rubber/flexible connector is used to connect the fuel pipe to the float bowl of the carb.

 

The reason I say this is because yesterday the capillary tube of my thermometer broke at the entry to the thermostat housing because the fuel pipe was slding and vibrating in its clip. The capillary tube, which is securely clipped to the fuel pipe, was attempting to restrain the fuel pipe's movement. Tedious to say the least when you are on the motorway, enjoying the drive, and notice your water temperature has taken a dive to the botttom stop.

 

So let us recap...

If you attach the capillary to the fuel pipe be sure the fuel pipe is securely clipped to the engine or the capillary ends up being 'The Clip' A thermometer assy, rebuilt exchange at £70.00, or a 'P' clip, about a quid!

 

Peter W

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Badges!

 

Not clips!

 

"Badges? We don' need no steenkin' badges!" ;)

 

If you are quoting from the film.

 

Nice looking car you linked to.

 

TT

 

Thank you TT for acknowledging my reference. Yes, otherwise, it was a nice looking car. But that over the top (literally) fuel line gave me gas.

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Interesting set of responses to the Fuel Pipe Clip.

 

During my research for the Moss catalogue fuel system pages of TR2-3, I could find no mention of clips for the fuel pipe to the thermostat housing. (that does not mean nothing was ever factory fitted though) Don's method with a 'P' clip is one I prefer, and use, where nothing has been fitted. TR 4/4A used the type where a rubber block has two moulded grooves and is fitted into a strip of bent metal. The other clip arrangement, a round rubber grommet fitted in a bracket I have seen on other Triumphs.

 

The secure clipping of the fuel pipe, I have to say, is important, when a rubber/flexible connector is used to connect the fuel pipe to the float bowl of the carb.

 

The reason I say this is because yesterday the capillary tube of my thermometer broke at the entry to the thermostat housing because the fuel pipe was slding and vibrating in its clip. The capillary tube, which is securely clipped to the fuel pipe, was attempting to restrain the fuel pipe's movement. Tedious to say the least when you are on the motorway, enjoying the drive, and notice your water temperature has taken a dive to the botttom stop.

 

So let us recap...

If you attach the capillary to the fuel pipe be sure the fuel pipe is securely clipped to the engine or the capillary ends up being 'The Clip' A thermometer assy, rebuilt exchange at £70.00, or a 'P' clip, about a quid!

 

Peter W

Welcome Peter, at last! ;)

Stuart

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You may want to check page 20 of the TR2/3/3A Spare Parts Catalogue:

Clip, petrol pipe 1 off 113503

 

The vacuum pipe clip is also listed on the same page:

Clip, suction pipe attachment 2 off 38303 - but to what does it attach?

(This is the same part no. as the metal strap securing the capillary tube to the fuel pipe).

 

The equivalent parts up to 8996E are on page 16.

 

Also, refer Section C page 4 instruction 7c of the Service Manual re. thermostat cover removal post-TS1201, “…The lower one accommodating the petrol pipe clip”.

 

Unfortunately, no illustrations.

 

Regards

Marke

Edited by scuttleshake

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You may want to check page 20 of the TR2/3/3A Spare Parts Catalogue:

Clip, petrol pipe 1 off 113503

 

The vacuum pipe clip is also listed on the same page:

Clip, suction pipe attachment 2 off 38303 - but to what does it attach?

(This is the same part no. as the metal strap securing the capillary tube to the fuel pipe).

 

The equivalent parts up to 8996E are on page 16.

 

Also, refer Section C page 4 instruction 7c re. thermostat cover removal post-TS1201, “…The lower one accommodating the petrol pipe clip”.

 

Unfortunately, no illustrations.

 

Regards

Marke

 

Marke:

 

gee thanks. I didn't notice those parts in the list. I made a bad assumption and thought it wasn't listed if not shown.

 

So now I have part numbers.

 

best regards,

 

Frank

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Some additional information...

 

From the TRA Judging Guide re. fuel lines pump to carb:

Up to early TR3As "A strap type retaining clip is used at the thermostat housing" - the P-clip as per Don?

Later TR3A and 3B "The retaining clip at the thermostat housing changes to an eye type" - as on the left of Frank's pic?

 

And from the same source re. vacuum advance line routing:

"Only early cars...the vacuum line runs beneath the fuel line retaining clip at the thermostat. On later cars...the vacuum advance line is routed through the eye that retains the fuel line at the thermostat".

 

The two clips 38303 are used to attach the vacuum line to the fuel line and are postioned either side of the thermostat housing. On looking through period photos in various TR books it seems that on later TR3As the vacuum line is routed in front of the by-pass hose while on earlier cars it is routed behind. The TRA Judging Guide notes this as well.

 

My earlier reference to "instruction 7c" did not say to refer to the Service Instruction Manual.

 

I think I need a holiday... :blink:

 

Marke

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