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InfinityJon

And so it begins.....

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Yes--cut out rusted areas back to sound metal, weld in patches, then replace the cruciate plate. Try to stabilize the frame through it all. 

The welding on the bottom side of the frame can tend to warp it a little so that the rear is lower than it should be. Some before/after measurements may be a good idea.

Ed

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I had similar damage but only on the bottom, so was concerned that the accumulated weld shrink on these long welds would warp the frame, i.e. That the rear chassis legs would go downwards.

I pre-stressed (bent) the chassis about 15-20 mm (that was a guestimate) before welding, so before welding, the rear ends sat 15-20 mm higher compared to the drawing.

I made the inserts for the corroded area’s with a nice fit, no wide gaps, only a V-gap for proper weld penetration, because the more welding you do, the larger the shrinkage/deformation. I welded in small increments, each weld immediated followed by peening with a small pointed hammer during cooling down with a sponge with water.

I’m not sure if all this was needed buy it worked out ok, I was less then 5 mm off the drawing elevations at the rear ends after completion.

Pay particular attention to the area where the trailing arms connect, everything in  should be sound. The internal stiffeners/braces I welded with plug welds.

Waldi

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2 hours ago, Waldi said:

I had similar damage but only on the bottom, so was concerned that the accumulated weld shrink on these long welds would warp the frame, i.e. That the rear chassis legs would go downwards.

I pre-stressed (bent) the chassis about 15-20 mm (that was a guestimate) before welding, so before welding, the rear ends sat 15-20 mm higher compared to the drawing.

I made the inserts for the corroded area’s with a nice fit, no wide gaps, only a V-gap for proper weld penetration, because the more welding you do, the larger the shrinkage/deformation. I welded in small increments, each weld immediately followed by peening with a small pointed hammer during cooling down with a sponge with water.

I’m not sure if all this was needed but it worked out ok, I was less then 5 mm off the drawing elevations at the rear ends after completion.

Pay particular attention to the area where the trailing arms connect, everything in  should be sound. The internal stiffeners/braces I welded with plug welds.

Waldi

"followed by peening with a small pointed hammer during cooling down with a sponge with water."   What is the reason to peen (the welds ?)  and why also temper the weld and the metal immediately around it (which makes it more brittle, and so prone to crack ) ? 

"I pre-stressed (bent up) the chassis about 15-20 mm (that was a guestimate) before welding, so before welding the rear ends sat 15-20 mm higher compared to the drawing."  ... "I was less then 5 mm off the drawing elevations at the rear ends after completion."  Did it end up higher or lower please ?

Thank you Waldi.

 

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Hi Bfg,

Peening:   I peened the welds to reduce residual (tensile) stresses that develop during cool down. That is the theory at least. It is these accumulated stresses that cause warping.

Cooling: I should have said “I kept the beams cool so the overal beam was not bending out as a result of one hot and one cold side”.

Quenching/ Hardening:   Since the metal cools down really fast because of the small intermittent welding I did and while peening (before water cooling) it futher cooled down, I was not concerned about hardening effects (which would make it prone for future cracks). By the time I applied the water/sponge, the metal had cooled down enough for that to be a concern.

What were final dimensions?  I would need to dig in my before&after dimensions, will see if I can find them and let you know.

Hope this helps,

Waldi

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The main rails should be flat from the front back to the diff area, where they "kick up" at  the rear.  I believe the rear ends of the rails should be about 4.5 inches above the plane of the rest of the cassis (verify this dimension before you take it as gospel).

A long straight edge and a tape are all that is needed to check this, though it would be an excellent time to also check the frame for twist and racking.

Ed

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No experience of Upol but POR15 Chassis Black works very well and gives a very good finish

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11 hours ago, InfinityJon said:

What are people’s views on Upol raptor bed liner to paint the chassis. Anyone have experience or advice good or bad!

Any others better?

Why would you? Chassis look much better in a good quality chassis black.

Stuart.

 

Marks TR5 555.jpg

 

Marks TR5 554.jpg

Edited by stuart

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My first choice for first coat on anything automotive is usually a good two part epoxy.  The TR6 frame has a lot of places that are very difficult to get at effectively with a spray gun though, so I brushed on two coats of POR15.

SDC11254a.JPG

Edited by ed_h

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12 minutes ago, ed_h said:

My first choice for first coat on anything automotive is usually a good two part epoxy.  The TR6 frame has a lot of places that are very difficult to get at effectively with a spray gun though, so I brushed on two coats of POR15.

SDC11254a.JPG

First coat on any of mine is the magic Bondarust.

Stuart.

 

Marks TR5 552.jpg

Marks TR5 553.jpg

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Bondarust seems to be well thought of in the UK, but I don't think it is widely available on this side of the Atlantic.  It appears to be a zinc chromate primer.

Ed

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30 minutes ago, ed_h said:

Bondarust seems to be well thought of in the UK, but I don't think it is widely available on this side of the Atlantic.  It appears to be a zinc chromate primer.

Ed

It is yes, I dont think they export to the States unfortunately.

Stuart.

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I used epoxymastic two pack and it seems to have worked pretty well. 

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15 hours ago, ed_h said:

Bondarust seems to be well thought of in the UK, but I don't think it is widely available on this side of the Atlantic.  It appears to be a zinc chromate primer.

Ed

I used aircraft zinc chromate primer the horrible dirty green colour as a base coat for my wings etc years ago, it is highly chip resistant as per my front valance and seems to be very long lasting and no paint reaction. I think that it can still be bought from a Dutch company called Rust-O- Lum?.

Bruce.

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.

^ I haven't been through this company's whole range but it seems like Noxde is one of the best anti-corrosion finishes they offer < here

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Can anyone tell me the height of the crank centreline above the chassis frame top face measured at the bell housing  and a second height from the fan end above the cross member please. I forgot to take the dimensions before I took the engine out. 

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What is everyone painting their suspension components with?

currently media blasting them and painting with bondarust primer+zinc directly to the bare metal.

Whatever you suggest top coat wise, will it take to bondarust?

Edited by InfinityJon

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I powder coat if it will fit in the oven, otherwise epoxy primer and good quality rattle can topcoat.

Don't know about the Bondarust.  We don't have it here.

Ed

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Two coats of POR15 Chassis Black, Powder coat from my experience not as tough.

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2 minutes ago, InfinityJon said:

Can I put it over the bondarust?

No designed to go over bare steel even better after shot blasting as it gives it a good key. The finish if you use a good brush will look as good powder coat and it flows well into any seams. 

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Bondarust will accept almost any paint covering. I did my chassis and parts with Bondarust followed by a fairly standard Chassis Black. Cant remember which one.

You will see in future use that any chips in the chassis black will reveal a perfect coating of bondarust underneath which is very hardwearing and doesn't chip easily.

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42 minutes ago, SeanF said:

Bondarust will accept almost any paint covering. I did my chassis and parts with Bondarust followed by a fairly standard Chassis Black. Cant remember which one.

You will see in future use that any chips in the chassis black will reveal a perfect coating of bondarust underneath which is very hardwearing and doesn't chip easily.

Thats my long term experience as well its why I use it all the time.You can apply any type of paint to it, I use a synthetic chassis black with a 2pack hardener mixed into it. Powder coat has some drawbacks as it will still chip and then water gets under it and will rot components from the inside out and it will chip where screw threads go in as well thus compromising it too.

Stuart.

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