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Nigel Triumph

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About Nigel Triumph

  • Birthday 07/03/1955

Profile Information

  • Location
    Leicestershire
  • Cars Owned:
    Classic Cars, especially Triumphs
    Classic Bikes, Triumph preferred of course
    Rugby - go Tigers!

Recent Profile Visitors

1,145 profile views
  1. Happy birthday Wayne, have a great day! Nigel
  2. Nigel Triumph

    F1

    Another +1 from me. Nigel
  3. Nigel Triumph

    F1

    I'm done with F1 after this season. Stewards making up the rules as they go along in order to deliver the scripted result? That's not sport. Nigel
  4. +1 for brass bleed nipples. Beware metric vs imperial though. Nigel
  5. Hi Rob, I think from the diagram on p17 and list of components on p18, it's item 4 'outer calibration screw and locking ring'. Nigel
  6. Don't understand lunges. Or did you mean lungs, as in drive it hard for a few miles first? I drove it hard for about 15 miles before the test but had to crawl in traffic for 5-10 minutes before arriving at the test station. It doesn't idle so smoothly after sitting in traffic and needs a couple of quick miles to settle down again. Nigel
  7. Yes, wind the largest adjustment ring on the metering unit up or down to get maximum vacuum. Idling speed will increase when the mixture is spot on, so the idle air bleed screw can be closed slightly. Nigel
  8. Hi Bruce, There's no obvious black smoke on acceleration, and no soot stains on the rear valance or bumper, so it isn't very rich. But 5% CO and a Lambda reading of 0.9 does suggest it's a bit rich. My 2.5 litre GT6 runs on twin SU HS6 carbs shows 3.5-4% CO and Lambda 0.95 at idle; it performs very well. I feel similar figures should be possible from the PI system on my TR6. Time will tell! Nigel
  9. Thank you Gareth. I've done that once before, following the instructions of a retired Lucas PI Service engineer. His advice was the same as yours, plus he used a vacuum gauge to set the mixture at tickover for maximum vacuum. He used to tune up the 2.5 PI saloons for the police and apparently this technique always gave the best performance. Nigel
  10. Thank you for your comments gentlemen. The engine does start to run a little rough after crawling and idling in traffic for 5-10 minutes, which makes me think it's rich enough to start fouling the plugs. It does smell a bit rich but it's not so bad as to coat the rear bumper with soot, as sometimes seen on PI cars. When I've nothing else to do, I will try to lean the metering unit a little using a home gas analyser to aim for 3.5-4% CO. If the car doesn't run so well like that, I can always put it back. Nigel
  11. I've recently had my 1970 CP Series TR6 PI MoT tested, and the emissions results on the MoT test weren't as I would have expected of a carb-fuelled classic. Of course a 1970 car doesn't legally need emissions testing, in fact doesn't need an MoT test at all, but it's interesting to see the results: Carbon Monoxide: 5% Lambda: 0.9 Hydrocarbons: 5,000 parts per million, at idle dropping to 2,000 ppm at fast idle The CO and Lambda values suggest the fuelling is quite rich. I'm aware that PI does normally run rich to compensate for the lack of acceleration enrichment, but do th
  12. I have CDD on my TR6 and GT6. Excellent products. Nigel
  13. The biggest difference is the camshaft, though there are many details to consider, for example the metering unit calibration, throttle bodies/linkage, overdrive... But the real question is why do it? In reality the CP series cars never made 150bhp, and performance difference vs the CR cars is marginal. Merely the opinion of CP series owner! Nigel
  14. I've had the same problem with rubber carb mounts for SU HS6s. Current repro are rubbish and fall within months. I've used secondhand originals, not great to be fitting such old parts but better than what's currently available new. Nigel
  15. The matt black finish has only been applied to the relevant area of the rear valence below the boot lid. The black finish should extend into the rear corners of the rear wings. Nigel
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