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Ian Vincent

CJ Autos Mini Tilting Car Lift

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Ian,

Mrs is a bossy mechanic and doesn't like taken orders, reckons shes the boss, so no change there!

I've added a couple of more photos, you can see it has moveable supports, they can go up and down the side frame provided you don't tighten up the nut and bolt too much, see the gap for them to do this inside each support. They also swing out or lay on the frame and the heavy duty rubber plate (also moves up and down each arm) is what connects with the chassis.

Best wishes,

Mike

SJR Scissor lift 2.jpg

592094105_SJRScissorlift4.jpg.98007366253a53d384bdd527b7b34c4c.jpg

 

SJR Scissor lift 3.jpg

Edited by MikeThomas

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If only I had a flat floor in my garage

Bob.

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No, it's a sloping floor would need about 6" at one end to get level, & then there would not be enough height to get through the garage door.

Bob.

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Hi Mike,

Shame on you telling your good lady you had built a new drinks bar and even she could lean on it.

For those with less room perhaps putting the car on roller dollies first might be enough to wiggle to lift and car into a workable situation.

Hi Bob,

Would it be possible to put a sleeper under the fixed end allowing the roller end to move. If you had locating pins to holes the block it would keep in place, better still bolts as that would add stability.

Rod

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Possibly Rod, but I seem to manage with ramps, trolley jack, & axle stands !

Bob.

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Hi Bob,

If you are like me I feel less and less like wanting to crawl underneath to fit a jack and/or axle stands. I hope to install a four post ramp eventually when I pluck up courage to cut the ceiling beams of my double garage. My half garage is 20ft x 15 and workshop other half garage is the same size, so floor room is not my issue. Lift height is the problem. As I only work on the TR's I could get away with a partial cut away to allow hard top etc to pass through. I would get 2.5 -3 feet lift which would be enough to carry out most tasks.

Personally I don't really like the car lifts due to stability worries but I am sure they are perfectly OK but thats my viewpoint.

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161978781_PrototypeRedLeds(RHS)Tail.thumb.JPG.6347a6053c8da84dd78ea414d7dc3974.JPG

This shows the size of my garage, & perhaps the downward slope towards the camera.

Bob.

Edited by Lebro

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Hi Bob,

I see what you mean about the floor, there is potentially a way to sort it relatively cheaper by shortening the door panel at the bottom and raising the floor to suit with a shallow ramp. 

I built my 3a ground up in a timber garage no bigger than you have there. you just have to move the car sideways to work on the other side!

Rod

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But then I would not be able to get my Jeep Cherokee in there if I need to work on it in the rain ! (it only just clears the open door now.)

Bob.

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Hi Bob,

Feels like groundhog day or living in a parrallel universe as I have one of those as well. I also have an XC90. The Jeep will pull a house down and has really only ever needed brakes, shocks sorted out. Only use it for towing but best thing I did was to replace anti roll bar bushes and shockers stiffened it up no end. The D5 XC90 does give better economy at around 30mpg and is super smooth.

The fuel cost for the jeep without a trailer is astronomical as i get around 20mpg towing 2 ton boat and trailer but drops to around 10--12 around town without trailer, yikes!!!!!!! Go figure that one!

You could fit air suzzies to lower it on the few occasions you need it in there.just kidding.

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My 1998 XJ is a 2.5 turbo diesel, I also use it for towing, at which it works very well. If I try hard I can get 30 MPG not towing, Have not measured MPG when towing.

Have changes all dampers, also fitted heavy duty rear springs.

A great work horse, & also pretty comfortable with A/C, electricaly adjustable leather seats, cruise control etc.

Bob.

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Hi bob,

There's the rub mine is a 98 Grand Cherokee Limited edition 4.0 liter petrol fully loaded with leccy everything, leather heated seats. Door steps make Rock crawling a bit difficult hee hee. They will really climb the side of a house, awesome! Does yours have quadtrac?

Edited by Rodbr

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48 minutes ago, Rodbr said:

Hi bob,

There's the rub mine is a 98 Grand Cherokee Limited edition 4.0 liter petrol fully loaded with leccy everything, leather heated seats. Door steps make Rock crawling a bit difficult hee hee. They will really climb the side of a house, awesome! Does yours have quadtrac?

No, rear wheel drive only on road as no centre diff. For off road (or snow) you can select 4 wheel drive normal, or low ratio. Same setup as series landies.

Bob

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On 3/27/2019 at 11:59 AM, Rodbr said:

Hi Bob,

If you are like me I feel less and less like wanting to crawl underneath to fit a jack and/or axle stands. I hope to install a four post ramp eventually when I pluck up courage to cut the ceiling beams of my double garage. My half garage is 20ft x 15 and workshop other half garage is the same size, so floor room is not my issue. Lift height is the problem. As I only work on the TR's I could get away with a partial cut away to allow hard top etc to pass through. I would get 2.5 -3 feet lift which would be enough to carry out most tasks.

Personally I don't really like the car lifts due to stability worries but I am sure they are perfectly OK but thats my viewpoint.

Rob,

Like you, with my advancing years, I have become less and less enamoured with crawling under the cars on axle stands and trying to work in limited space.

I've just bought a 2 post lift by Twin Busch. It's German with a UK depot at Kettering. Saw it at last Novembers' Classic Car Show at the NEC. £1200 inc VAT. Operates on normal domestic electrics via 16Amp supply. Very substantial construction.

Still got to finish installation but looking forward to the ease of using it. I also have limited headroom so I've had to position it so that the car cockpit area fits between 2 roof joists to maximise clearance. I should end up with approx. 1500 mm max. under the chassis, ideal for working from a rotating stool on castors.

Dave McD

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Make sure the concrete base to the garage is of the required quality as recommended by the lift suppliers, the two post lift is very "needy" as regards a high quality underpinning. Standard garage concrete bases are NOT deep enough and are not high enough quality.

Mick Richards 

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Yes very important at least 200 mm of C30 concrete and reinforcement in the concrete for a two post lift.

It should also not be hand mixed but obtained from a quality controlled batching plant.

The old 100mm concrete base used in a garage up to 10 years ago is just not up to it and even for a 4 post lift that does not apply bending moments to the mass concrete to any real extent, 150mm  of C30 concrete with reinforcement is the way to go.

I had 200 mm C30 concrete with reinforcement when I instaled my two post lift in 2013.

There is a foundation plan on therir website that specs 200mm concrete but only C20 strengh.

250mm deep for the Transit size van lift.

 

 

Edited by Eddie Cairns

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21 hours ago, Motorsport Mickey said:

Make sure the concrete base to the garage is of the required quality as recommended by the lift suppliers, the two post lift is very "needy" as regards a high quality underpinning. Standard garage concrete bases are NOT deep enough and are not high enough quality.

Mick Richards 

 

20 hours ago, Eddie Cairns said:

Yes very important at least 200 mm of C30 concrete and reinforcement in the concrete for a two post lift.

It should also not be hand mixed but obtained from a quality controlled batching plant.

The old 100mm concrete base used in a garage up to 10 years ago is just not up to it and even for a 4 post lift that does not apply bending moments to the mass concrete to any real extent, 150mm  of C30 concrete with reinforcement is the way to go.

I had 200 mm C30 concrete with reinforcement when I instaled my two post lift in 2013.

There is a foundation plan on therir website that specs 200mm concrete but only C20 strengh.

250mm deep for the Transit size van lift.

 

 

Hi Mick/Eddie,

Thanks for your concern/comments/advice. I went into this with my eyes wide open. I'm both aware of and acknowledge the need for a substantial foundation. 

I drilled holes in the floor before my purchase and established that I do not have the recommended min 200 mm slab.

I have saw cut the floor and will be cutting out the concrete at the main post positions and excavating to a depth of c.250mm. I will be undercutting the edges of the remaining slab so that the bending moments exerted by the loaded posts will be resisted by the surrounding existing slab. I will be drilling and grouting dowel bars into the edges of the surrounding slab to create a composite new/old construction. Concrete will be site mixed in a concrete mixer with mix proportions to min C30/20 strength at 28 days.

I was a Civil Engineer throughout my whole career and am perfectly happy with what I will be constructing. 

Additionally, as a further belt and braces solution to the potential for the main posts overturning under load, with the tops of my posts being virtually flush with the garage ceiling (i.e. top height to which I can raise a car) I will be installing a 100 x 50 PFC steel channel between the posts to act as a strut, which will not limit my raising height.

I trust this convinces you that the TRR will not be publishing my obituary resulting from a demise under a collapsed car/2 post lift any time soon.

Dave McD

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Good man...proper job.

Mick Richards

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Dave, just for interest what depth were you finding after drilling.

The guys that installed mine said they go to jobs and the concrete drill just goes through some floors with no fight and they have to advise customers to get their floor sorted before installation.

I had my floor laid a year or more before the lift was installed. The install guys were happy with the fight the floor put up when drilling it as the drill did not speed up at any point in the drilling of the floor.

Good luck with your project.

 

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My house is 1937 build and had a 110mm depth when drilled, lots of dark grey dust. The builder cut out the square for the scissor lift and kangoed it out and put another 150mm from that base to allow the scissor lift "cassettes " to slide in and the ramps to lie level with the floor when stored.

 

Mick Richards

P1010199.JPG

P1010190.JPG

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Love your set up there Mick. 

Just noticed the spare axles hanging on the walls. 

H

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52 minutes ago, Hamish said:

Love your set up there Mick. 

Just noticed the spare axles hanging on the walls. 

H

Thanks Hamish, yes I have to get angry to "full press" the top axle up there in one.

Mick Richards

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On 4/6/2019 at 7:26 PM, Eddie Cairns said:

Dave, just for interest what depth were you finding after drilling.

The guys that installed mine said they go to jobs and the concrete drill just goes through some floors with no fight and they have to advise customers to get their floor sorted before installation.

I had my floor laid a year or more before the lift was installed. The install guys were happy with the fight the floor put up when drilling it as the drill did not speed up at any point in the drilling of the floor.

Good luck with your project.

 

Eddie,

The floor is in a unit that I rent. It was reasonably robust from the "drillability" point of view but only approx. 90 - 100mm thick, hence the need to break out locally and upgrade.

The new concrete will be compacted with a vibrating poker and reinforced with A393 steel mesh, carefully placed and fixed in advance, with a template of the post base to avoid drilling through it for the new HD bolts.

Dave McD

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Dave

Being intrigued as to what a 'vibrating poker' looked like I popped it into google and ended up on a porn site......

Ha ha, feeling mischievous............:lol:

 

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