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JohnRoberts

Ethanol and Copper Tube

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Only in so far as ethanol promotes galvanic corrosion between dissimilar metals. The tests I referred to earlier are reported to have shown the effect on brass and copper components is minor. Apparently aluminium was worse in conjunction with steel. Some petrol is reputed to contain additives to reduce the effect, as do the various magic anti-ethanol potions. 

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please, whisky   :o

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16 hours ago, RobH said:

Only in so far as ethanol promotes galvanic corrosion between dissimilar metals. The tests I referred to earlier are reported to have shown the effect on brass and copper components is minor. Apparently aluminium was worse in conjunction with steel. Some petrol is reputed to contain additives to reduce the effect, as do the various magic anti-ethanol potions. 

Ethanol absorbs water and then hydrolyses to acid. Two dissimilar metals [in contact] in an acid/aqueous solution will result in the more reactive one [such as aluminium  with steel] will galvanically corrode. The "anti-ethanol" additives are supposed to neutralise the acid. All metals  tarnish, even shiny ones like stainless steel and the tarnish, effectively a ceramic, can act as a protective layer.  WE are used to the brown appearance of copper, that is tarnish , really clean copper is an attractive pink. Acids can remove the tarnish - eg flux in soldering --  but I would think any acid in petrol will only be a weak organic and very dilute at that and so not effect copper components.

The two main exceptions to this  are gold which doesn't do anything - ever -  and iron which rusts. Because iron/steel is so common we tend to think it is representative of all metals but actually it is completely untypical. Rust is a complex substance more like a sponge which holds water and air against the iron which reacts continuously. This why iron component s corrode through whereas other metals mostly do not.

Having said all that I only use Esso /Tesco  higher octane petrol in my car and  only put small amounts of fuel in tank to ensure petrol is always relatively fresh through rapid turnover.

 

Mike

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