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Mk2 Chopper

Thrust washers (again )

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Hi guys,

 

Thanks for all the helpful posts I've already learnt from.

 

As a relatively new 6 owner here, and I want to check my thrust washers as a preventative measure.

 

I've searched through many threads on here and have got a good idea now, but I wanted to list it out to make sure I've got it right.

 

1) using a Dti gauge measure the current end float (push pulley in, press clutch to push out)

 

2) if above reveals wear over minimum, drain oil, remove sump, bearing cap and take out TW's and check (if possible) what size were fitted.

 

3) if I can see what size were fitted then order a new set of the same and fit and re test the end float. Any variation would now need an additional over size TW to that was previously fitted?

 

Is it obvious which way round they fit?

 

4) use assembly lube to refit TW's and bearing/cap, torque up.

 

5) new sump gasket (and a sealant?) And fit sump, new oil, check for leaks.

 

Is that pretty much the method?

 

Gareth

Edited by Mk2 Chopper

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Sounds about right.

 

It is pretty clear which way they fit with the facing to the crank.

 

It is important to get them right so the end float is in the range and not too tight as they can "pick up" when the engine warms which is just as harmful as dropping out.

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Thanks Andy, i'm sure it will become more clear as i delve into it for real, not just looking at words and pictures!

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Hi Gareth

While the sump is off it’s worth replacing main & big end bearings and worth bringing your oil pump within spec. You may have done this before but worth checking.

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Thanks Kev, I did see a lot of references to that in previous 'Thrust Washer' posts, so worthwhile taking a look at the same time, thanks for the suggestion, just a few bits to order and see how we get on!

 

Gareth

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Gareth,

Minor correction..it's not a case of finding what was fitted, it's finding out as-is now as it's this measurement that needs correcting. Anything you measure out of the engine will be worn and probably not uniformly across it's surface so best way to sort it is to measure the end-float now.

Then..if it's below the spec, remove the old washers and then measure the total end float (without the washers in).

Then..get a pair of the right thickness to sort it out.

I'm a more than satisfied customer of Scott Helm in the states. (http://www.customthrustwashers.com). Costs a bit more than the standard ones from the usual suspects but has the advantage of being top quality solid alloy and precisely the size you need.

 

I followed Scott's instructions on his page and this gets the best end result.

 

Hope this helps.

Edited by AndrewP

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Handy Hint

Put the car up in the air the day before you will be doing the job and drain the oil.

Then when you take the sump off not so many oil drips go on you.

Peter W

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Thanks Andrew I'll take a look at his site, I wasn't aware you could measure the end float without the washers, but that makes sense to get the current wear. Thanks

 

Peter, that's a brilliant tip, one that I'll be using for sure!

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+1 for Scott Helms at custom thrust washers. They are wider than the standard ones so more of a snug fit. I used a thick plastic tie-wrap to slide the old ones out and the new ones in.

I would add get a standard T/W for the front ( 0.092” ?) and whatever size you need for the rear to get the float.

Also definitely a good idea to replace the main and big end shells. Don’t overtighten the screws in the alloy block at the front of the engine. Also I reused the old wood wedges with Hylomar sealant and have a leak free engine.

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Thanks Dave,appreciate your comments, all valuable information

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Gareth,

Here’s an example for you and if you provide the measurements to Scott H and go ahead to will be impressed with attentiveness and turn-around:

Original end float .016”

Rear thrust washer measured .085”. Front .089”.

Scott supplied .092 (std) front and .093 rear which brought the end float back to .005”.

No need to measure the end float without the thrust washers to determine the sizes you need.

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Ok so take a measurement of the actual current end float then measure the thrust washers that are in there, so I guess it'll come down to is it cheaper to buy some standard washers to test end float measurement or a micrometer to measure the current washers!

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