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Hi Folks,

I've just been watching the BBC weather. It is not good in France/Italy.

Rivers are not just breaking their banks but taking the banks and everything on them away down the river.

Houses collapsing into torrents of water.  One house still had people in it.

Quite terrible.

 

Roger

 

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Hi Roger, Yes, its no good anymore saying that village has never been washed away in hundreds of years.  Huge cloudbursts are becoming the new norm. We live alongside a hill stream that drains about 20 acres of pasture 300 feet above us. The speed of its response to heavy rain is astonishing. We have started to take countermeasures, but even those wont likely cope with a 1 month of rain in 24 hours.

https://supertrarged.wordpress.com/2015/11/12/concrete-canvas-ditch-lining/

Peter

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That is very impressive, Peter - great deal of work, but I am sure it will be worth it.

There seems no end to the rainfall at the moment and a great many people in various parts of Europe will be hit very hard - and not for the first time.

Best wishes,

Ian Cornish

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2 minutes ago, ianc said:

That is very impressive, Peter - great deal of work, but I am sure it will be worth it.

There seems no end to the rainfall at the moment and a great many people in various parts of Europe will be hit very hard - and not for the first time.

Best wishes,

Ian Cornish

Hi Ian, CC isnt cheap, there's £1500-worth there, but easy to transport and quick to install. A day's work. Since then we have hired a bigger digger and driver to raise berms to try to deflect a big flood that exceeds the stream bed capacity, but I think it may need more. Rain runs off dry sheep pasture as if its concrete. There are 'dams' of rocks and dead trees further up the stream and if they slide in a storm we will be in big trouble. Impossible to access with machinery, except maybe a spider-excavator. I'm reading up on stream stabilising techniques. Or maybe a family of beavers could do the job for free.  Peter

 

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Well folks, we live in the corridor where Alex hit the west of France in the early hours of Friday morning. Although the worst of the gale only lasted 1 1/2 hours the havoc wreaked was considerable.

For those interested in such things, the barometer dropped from 1000 to 970 mb in 3 hours and locally there were gusts recorded of 186 kph or 90 knots if you are if a nautical mind.

A particular feature, apart from uprooted pines and cedars, was huge branches of oak and ash trees being snapped off high up in the canopy - as they are still in leaf.

Fortunately most of the damage is material rather than human

The experience is not one I should like live through again.

Our garden is a battle scene but there is a bonus as the bill for fuelling the wood stove will be reduced for the next few years.

Don't bother coming to Brittany to buy a chain saw - they've gone the same way as toilet paper earlier in the year!

james

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We have had gales that have left oaks and ash on the edge of the wood unscathed,  but have twisted 10 inch trunks to topple crowns in the middle of the wood. Quite well known to foresters apparently, trees dont like turbulence. Makes for good habitat.

Peter

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Haven't seen concrete canvas used domestically, only in military rapid-build inflatable bunkers where it is an impressively "instant" material.

But I often wondered about ditching but as you wrote it is not cheap, though with difficult access as you seem to have it must be particularly cost effective. 

With it's smooth sides if you have much of a fall on the ditch it will have an impressive discharge speed at the bottom.

Alan

 

 

 

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16 minutes ago, barkerwilliams said:

Haven't seen concrete canvas used domestically, only in military rapid-build inflatable bunkers where it is an impressively "instant" material.

But I often wondered about ditching but as you wrote it is not cheap, though with difficult access as you seem to have it must be particularly cost effective. 

With it's smooth sides if you have much of a fall on the ditch it will have an impressive discharge speed at the bottom.

Alan

 

 

 

Alan. Yes, with a layer of algae it is extremely slippery. The water zooms down carrying leaves, twigs, sticks with it until it reaches a 12 inch culvert. Every autumn we have to unblock it by hand. The water velocity compacts the stuff , its like digging a 2 yard length of 2 foot deep, 2 foot wide, sodden phone directories. Another job is to dispense with the pipe using more CC. but there's no access for a digger. Peter

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18 hours ago, james christie said:

Well folks, we live in the corridor where Alex hit the west of France in the early hours of Friday morning. Although the worst of the gale only lasted 1 1/2 hours the havoc wreaked was considerable.

For those interested in such things, the barometer dropped from 1000 to 970 mb in 3 hours and locally there were gusts recorded of 186 kph or 90 knots if you are if a nautical mind.

A particular feature, apart from uprooted pines and cedars, was huge branches of oak and ash trees being snapped off high up in the canopy - as they are still in leaf.

Fortunately most of the damage is material rather than human

The experience is not one I should like live through again.

Our garden is a battle scene but there is a bonus as the bill for fuelling the wood stove will be reduced for the next few years.

Don't bother coming to Brittany to buy a chain saw - they've gone the same way as toilet paper earlier in the year!

james

Good to hear you survived James. Stay safe.

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