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250 Strombergs or Webers?


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#1 Rem18

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Posted 12 June 2018 - 12:25 PM

Would you have Strombergs or Webers as a choice on the 250?


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#2 AL TR250

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Posted 12 June 2018 - 01:38 PM

My original Strombergs were fine. Never had a problem
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#3 Tom Fremont

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Posted 12 June 2018 - 01:42 PM

On an unmodified stock engine the Strombergs are best, as they meter the fuel just right and are original. No power gain can be had by fitting Webers to one such.

 

That said, with increased c/r and CP or comparable cam, Webers will deliver TR5 performance with unsurpassed reliability ( and immunity to altitude sickness! ) - if they are set up properly ( after which they don't require adjustment, ever, in my experience ). DIY seems to be difficult for most, but in Europe and the UK where emissions laws didn't prevent their use, Weber expertise abounds and is easily found. The marginal cost of a conversion above an engine rebuild is $2-3K, cheap in my book. This is my recommendation hands down if you want to keep up with modern traffic.

 

I ran the stock '250 for 20 years, and Webered ones for 22, with one of each in the stable for a couple of years. All told 180,000 miles I'd guess. I'm just glad I didn't have to stuff all that gear alongside the steering column ^_^ .  

 

Cheers,

Tom


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#4 Rem18

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Posted 12 June 2018 - 02:03 PM

Thanks Tom

I have a 5 and 6. I live in the Alps and altitude isnt a problem for me.

I used to have a Daimler v8 Mk11 with Strombergs and they never gave me trouble.

Just asking for the very reason you said that maybe with Webers and a PI cam you can have a car as bright as the 5/6.

Thanks

Tony

On an unmodified stock engine the Strombergs are best, as they meter the fuel just right and are original. No power gain can be had by fitting Webers to one such.

 

 

 

That said, with increased c/r and CP or comparable cam, Webers will deliver TR5 performance with unsurpassed reliability ( and immunity to altitude sickness! ) - if they are set up properly ( after which they don't require adjustment, ever, in my experience ). DIY seems to be difficult for most, but in Europe and the UK where emissions laws didn't prevent their use, Weber expertise abounds and is easily found. The marginal cost of a conversion above an engine rebuild is $2-3K, cheap in my book. This is my recommendation hands down if you want to keep up with modern traffic.

 

I ran the stock '250 for 20 years, and Webered ones for 22, with one of each in the stable for a couple of years. All told 180,000 miles I'd guess. I'm just glad I didn't have to stuff all that gear alongside the steering column ^_^ .  

 

Cheers,

T


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#5 Tom Fremont

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Posted 12 June 2018 - 03:36 PM

Thanks Tom

I have a 5 and 6. I live in the Alps and altitude isnt a problem for me.

I used to have a Daimler v8 Mk11 with Strombergs and they never gave me trouble.

Just asking for the very reason you said that maybe with Webers and a PI cam you can have a car as bright as the 5/6.

Thanks

Tony

Hi Tony,

 

How do your P.I.s run at sea level? If they're fine without re-tuning that may be exceptional. If you keep them at high altitudes there's no reason why they shouldn't run fine tuned accordingly, but since the mixture control unit delivers fuel in inverse proportion to manifold pressure the tendency is to deliver too much when  ascending, or too little when descending. On a racetrack at constant altitude, no issues. 

 

Written by one who's never owned a P.I. -_- though I've driven/ridden in a couple of them.

 

Cheers,

Tom


Edited by Tom Fremont, 12 June 2018 - 03:37 PM.

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#6 Rem18

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Posted 12 June 2018 - 05:53 PM

Ahhaaa I was being a bit blase!

Ok so I live at 600m and when I go down I dont notice anything really.

I have to say that I am one of those that uses the vernier on the standard distributor with points or at least keep my ears on as I tend to leave it pinking on hard acceleration in high gear so at worst going down I might back the timing off a bit.

I run my PI without the cap on (you need the screws in even without the cap or its massively rich). As you climb you get more power as fuel is going up. When going High over 2,000m it gets a bit uncomfortable and so  I give the PI registration a bit of a turn (the whole group) and then when I come back down I then put it back to where it was. Its easy really your rolling road is the road. bags of power then your rich, hunting is too lean.

Its never failed. But you do have to know what your doing first time. And take some tipex with you to mark the ring block.

T

 

Hi Tony,

 

How do your P.I.s run at sea level? If they're fine without re-tuning that may be exceptional. If you keep them at high altitudes there's no reason why they shouldn't run fine tuned accordingly, but since the mixture control unit delivers fuel in inverse proportion to manifold pressure the tendency is to deliver too much when  ascending, or too little when descending. On a racetrack at constant altitude, no issues. 

 

Written by one who's never owned a P.I. -_- though I've driven/ridden in a couple of them.

 

Cheers,

Tom


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#7 Tom Fremont

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Posted 12 June 2018 - 07:24 PM

Ahhaaa I was being a bit blase!

Ok so I live at 600m and when I go down I dont notice anything really.

I have to say that I am one of those that uses the vernier on the standard distributor with points or at least keep my ears on as I tend to leave it pinking on hard acceleration in high gear so at worst going down I might back the timing off a bit.

I run my PI without the cap on (you need the screws in even without the cap or its massively rich). As you climb you get more power as fuel is going up. When going High over 2,000m it gets a bit uncomfortable and so  I give the PI registration a bit of a turn (the whole group) and then when I come back down I then put it back to where it was. Its easy really your rolling road is the road. bags of power then your rich, hunting is too lean.

Its never failed. But you do have to know what your doing first time. And take some tipex with you to mark the ring block.

T

Makes sense - wonder how many other owners know the trick to keeping a P.I. happy at different altitudes!

 

We took my Webered driver through the Eisenhower tunnel @ 3400m with no issues nor adjustment. Plugs looked fine when I checked on the way down. Word is the altitude penalty amounts to 1 point of compression for each 1600m, so more throttle is needed climbing.

 

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Cheers,

Tom


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