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Good afternoon all, 

I have recently purchased my TR6 from California, I had initially bought the car for my retirement in Spain, hence the LHD, however due to the new EU and Brexit laws we shall not be moving to Spain permanently now, so I had a dilemma do I sell or do I keep her, I have chosen the latter, however unfortunately I am a useless mechanic and therefore I will be on this Forum crying out for help and advise on a regular basis, so please be patient :D

So my first question please is this, I would like to get the engine sorted first and to get the horse power up the British cars BHP, can anyone recommend which camshaft to buy and where from, also which exhaust system would you recommend and again where from, I have a company in Nuneaton I.B Rebores who are going to overhaul the head for me as soon I have removed it.

To be honest I haven't a clue where to start with my project, I intend to have new carpets, hood, respray, possibly new dash , not sure if I need to change the wiring loom as that puts the fear of God into me, I suppose I could do with a list of say 1 - 10 ? such as start here then ..... etc.etc.. I am not looking to have a concours vehicle but I would like the car to look really good and give her many more years cruising on our roads.

There you go, thats where I'm at, just received the V5 and insured the car and fit new plates tomorrow and then driving her home praying that she makes the 30 minute journey from pal's garage where I have stored her whilst waiting for the V5, any help or advise would be much appreciated and I thank you in advance, please remember not too much Jargon as what I know about mechanics you can write on the top of my Ariel . thanks again Phil new member. 

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Hi Phil,

welcome to the forum.

Where to start -  aaaarrrggghhh

be realistic in what you want.

You say to get the BHP up to UK level. The US cars were slightly underwhelming.  You will need more than a new cam.

As it is road going at the moment try to do jobs that do NOT take it off the roads for too  long.

 

If it was me I would take my time and make an extensive list. Do the priorities.

 

Good Luck

 

Roger

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Hi Phil

Welcome Rogers beat me to it make a list of jobs and go from there there's plenty you can do to increase the torque on the engine but it will be costly if you go overboard with it , I'm sure others will give you some excellent advise on this. Are you going to change to right hand drive? and don't forget there's plenty on here to help you do a search or just ask 

Chris

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Hello Philip and yes, Welcome.

where to start, find your local TR Register group get along to a meeting, join the club, and get some knowledgeable, local hands on information. 
whereabouts are you?

You have great opportunity to have a fabulous hobby and bags of fun.

as others have said you will need a list of priorities , but to be honest running a classic 50 year old car you will always have a list, it’s part of the fun.

John

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With regard to the engine, if you are still retaining carbs rather than converting to Pi, then get in touch with Chris Witor (Google), he mainly deals the T2000, 2.5 Saloons but what he doesn't know about the Triumph 6 pot engines isn't worth knowing!!  He has a whole wealth of knowledge about cylinder heads and cam shafts and a whole bunch of Pi stuff if that's the direction you hope to go.

Cheers Rob  

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Phil,

before you start, do the math first.

Look up prices, and make an estimate for the work you think you cannot do yourselves.

This helps you to better understand the cost involved (so you can compare with cars for sale that tick your boxes).

Once finished, my initial cost estimate almost doubled (you could say I’m not a very good estimator), also because I ended up doing much more than initially planned.

Waldi

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Hey Phil

I think if I were in your situation, I'd initially put on electronic ignition (Pertronix or Ignition 123) new tyres and ensure suspension bushings etc correct and run it about for a few months whilst researching options.  Maybe convert to RHD-It'll still feel authentically 70s but keep up w modern traffic ok. 

Enjoy the car for awhile and plan how you are going.  Head skim and 3 webers will bring US engine up to UK power or you could sort a Lucas PI system but I reckon if I were in your shoes I'd go straight to EFI and get the car more efficient and more reliable than either option.  It's a question of originality v enjoyment.  I have a PI car, love the tech to bits but it is a liability if I find myself in traffic.  The plugs foul and she runs like a dog until I can get them sorted.  The PI system (at least as installed in my one) does not like modern traffic...  A EFI system will sort that.  You can also decide on cams for more top end power or just allowing the engine's existing torque to pull you around.  Question is whether you're racing vs fast road car more than making the HP numbers look smart.

A 3rd option that @RogerH can advise on is supercharging the US block. Might be a quick way of achieving acceptable HP without expensive mods.  May lose some of the engine noise but less fiddling/cost to sort.

Other advice: Relays for the headlights (and fuel pump if you go PI).  It's a relatively simple DIY (PM me) but if you're nervous I'm sure a decent auto sparky could do in an afternoon.  That takes the strain off the original wiring and (more importantly) switchgear by reducing the amps through those circuits.

Mine has rear shock conversion which I understand is good if your levers are aged.  Some swear by the levers, others swear at them.  If you go for the upgrade make sure it's the more robust mounting option and consider a chassis reinforcement.  Again: In a staged, rolling restoration, it's not stupid money.

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First and foremost run it this summer and find what niggles you about it, especially if you now intend to to keep it long term in the uk you may decide a right hand drive conversion to be a priority as many do.

Before throwing a bucket  of money at it , have the chassis and bodywork checked over and any work required sorted then you can build on a solid foundation. 

It pays to speak to the engine specialist and get some prices and specs from them as there are varying stages of rebuild/upgrades. using it for a while  will give you a feel for the car and a much better idea of where you want to go with it.

Welcome to the forum and enjoy your car.

Brian

 

 

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Welcome. Personally I believe that it's important to get to know a car before embarking on any major changes .

I'd run it for the remainder of the warm  months and prepare a list of things I'd like to do. Then prioritize the list to what can be achieved over the winter months- note some parts are hard to get at the moment due to covid shortages and some jobs might require second hand components sourced from car dismantlers or swap meets.

Then you need to fit the work in with your holiday in Spain.

Good luck.

 

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Hi Phillip, welcome.

Because of your honest post I want to be also honest to you: sell the car at once

and before you spend any money on it and before you dismantle anything.

Then buy the best TR you can get for some more money and have fun with it.

Even with the best TR there is always something that will cause you problems.

Don‘t start your TR adventure with a wrack.

Ciao, Marco

 

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Was I too honest?

I just asked me wife and told her about.

She told me I should not worry, she bets you don’t do what I recommended to you…..

Edited by Z320
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Marco is correct.

If you were an experienced restorer and would enjoy the process of months and years of stripping and refurbishment all along paying out wads of money then great, carry on, that's what lots of us do.

However the most fun I ever had was buying a classic that was in great condition which I could afford. Somebody else had all the problems and costs, and for the price I paid I would never managed to build it for that money.

Whichever your choice, good luck, we are here whatever you decide.

Mick Richards   

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3 hours ago, Waldi said:

my initial cost estimate almost doubled (you could say I’m not a very good estimator),

No Waldi, nothing wrong with your estimating, I think it has happened to all of us.

 

Best to work out an estimate and then multiply it by three.

Then you may (…may…) get a pleasant surprise when it is finished.

 

Charlie.

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Welcome Phil. 

I think reading up about engine upgrades will help, you'll see how others did things and the pitfalls etc. But certainly it seems more than possible to get the power you want by cam, head and carburettor changes. Is the bottom end any good before you start bolting on more power? 

As for the rest of the car, I'm inclined to suggest running it around and seeing where you are with it, you might find the brakes and clutch hydraulics need work and other areas start to show issues once you start using it. 

These cars from a mechanical point of view are quite good to learn on, and that becomes part of the fun with these little roadsters. 

Gareth

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3 hours ago, matttnz said:

Hey Phil

I think if I were in your situation, I'd initially put on electronic ignition (Pertronix or Ignition 123) new tyres and ensure suspension bushings etc correct and run it about for a few months whilst researching options.  Maybe convert to RHD-It'll still feel authentically 70s but keep up w modern traffic ok. 

Enjoy the car for awhile and plan how you are going.  Head skim and 3 webers will bring US engine up to UK power or you could sort a Lucas PI system but I reckon if I were in your shoes I'd go straight to EFI and get the car more efficient and more reliable than either option.  It's a question of originality v enjoyment.  I have a PI car, love the tech to bits but it is a liability if I find myself in traffic.  The plugs foul and she runs like a dog until I can get them sorted.  The PI system (at least as installed in my one) does not like modern traffic...  A EFI system will sort that.  You can also decide on cams for more top end power or just allowing the engine's existing torque to pull you around.  Question is whether you're racing vs fast road car more than making the HP numbers look smart.

A 3rd option that @RogerH can advise on is supercharging the US block. Might be a quick way of achieving acceptable HP without expensive mods.  May lose some of the engine noise but less fiddling/cost to sort.

Other advice: Relays for the headlights (and fuel pump if you go PI).  It's a relatively simple DIY (PM me) but if you're nervous I'm sure a decent auto sparky could do in an afternoon.  That takes the strain off the original wiring and (more importantly) switchgear by reducing the amps through those circuits.

Mine has rear shock conversion which I understand is good if your levers are aged.  Some swear by the levers, others swear at them.  If you go for the upgrade make sure it's the more robust mounting option and consider a chassis reinforcement.  Again: In a staged, rolling restoration, it's not stupid money.

My 1970 CP PI didn't like traffic and I live near central Sydney, so it is a daily driving hazard. I eventually solved it by fitting a new electronic ignition system (the old one had poor wiring) and increased the timing to 15 deg BTDC at 700rpm idle. I can now idle all day and my fuel consumption improved for about 20mpg to 27mpg on a mainly country drive.

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I bought mine with a really good chassis and body and fully knowing that there would be jobs I needed to do. I’m just discovering what they are and really enjoying the process, but eyes fully open that things will crawl out of the woodwork.

I wasn’t expecting to have to put new fuel hard lines in and replace the hoses, but then again, I didn’t know it had an alloy tank when I bought it, so negatives and positives.

I’ve only driven it into the garage so far. Had I not decided to tackle the fuel smell first I’d probably put a few miles on it.

Working on these cars is half the enjoyment, but you do have to enjoy spannering, otherwise go with Marco’s suggestion before you get emotionally and financially attached.

Incidentally, speed is relative. Why would you want to spend a fortune on upgrading the engine to something that’ll still be slower than a lot of modern cars.

Edited by Jonny TR6
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5 hours ago, Mk2 Chopper said:

Welcome Phil. 

I think reading up about engine upgrades will help, you'll see how others did things and the pitfalls etc. But certainly it seems more than possible to get the power you want by cam, head and carburettor changes. Is the bottom end any good before you start bolting on more power? 

As for the rest of the car, I'm inclined to suggest running it around and seeing where you are with it, you might find the brakes and clutch hydraulics need work and other areas start to show issues once you start using it. 

These cars from a mechanical point of view are quite good to learn on, and that becomes part of the fun with these little roadsters. 

Gareth

Thank you Gareth, sound advice,  I think perhaps drive and enjoy the car for a while and find the pitfalls like you say , Thanks again

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4 hours ago, Jonny TR6 said:

I bought mine with a really good chassis and body and fully knowing that there would be jobs I needed to do. I’m just discovering what they are and really enjoying the process, but eyes fully open that things will crawl out of the woodwork.

I wasn’t expecting to have to put new fuel hard lines in and replace the hoses, but then again, I didn’t know it had an alloy tank when I bought it, so negatives and positives.

I’ve only driven it into the garage so far. Had I not decided to tackle the fuel smell first I’d probably put a few miles on it.

Working on these cars is half the enjoyment, but you do have to enjoy spannering, otherwise go with Marco’s suggestion before you get emotionally and financially attached.

Incidentally, speed is relative. Why would you want to spend a fortune on upgrading the engine to something that’ll still be slower than a lot of modern cars.

Hi Jonny, thanks for the feedback, speed is irrelevant to me I used to drive my XKR like an 80 year old on a Sunday morning, initially I just wanted it to be as per the UK spec models, but listening to everyone's comments I'm thinking why not just leave it as it is, less hassle less spending, happy days , thanks again

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4 hours ago, John McCormack said:

My 1970 CP PI didn't like traffic and I live near central Sydney, so it is a daily driving hazard. I eventually solved it by fitting a new electronic ignition system (the old one had poor wiring) and increased the timing to 15 deg BTDC at 700rpm idle. I can now idle all day and my fuel consumption improved for about 20mpg to 27mpg on a mainly country drive.

Hey John , thank you for your feedback , pleased you got your car running all Tickety Boo, great idea, many thanks phil

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6 hours ago, Mike C said:

Welcome. Personally I believe that it's important to get to know a car before embarking on any major changes .

I'd run it for the remainder of the warm  months and prepare a list of things I'd like to do. Then prioritize the list to what can be achieved over the winter months- note some parts are hard to get at the moment due to covid shortages and some jobs might require second hand components sourced from car dismantlers or swap meets.

Then you need to fit the work in with your holiday in Spain.

Good luck.

 

Cheers Mike , yes I think after listening to yourself and many other comments , I am going to do exactly that , enjoy the car through what summer that we have and then take a look at the situation in the winter , thank you , phil

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5 hours ago, Motorsport Mickey said:

Marco is correct.

If you were an experienced restorer and would enjoy the process of months and years of stripping and refurbishment all along paying out wads of money then great, carry on, that's what lots of us do.

However the most fun I ever had was buying a classic that was in great condition which I could afford. Somebody else had all the problems and costs, and for the price I paid I would never managed to build it for that money.

Whichever your choice, good luck, we are here whatever you decide.

Mick Richards   

Hi Mick , thank you for your feedback, you and a few other fella's have convinced me to just enjoy the car the car for now during these pleasant summer evenings and I'll re-visit the situation in the winter, many thanks, phil

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7 hours ago, brian -r said:

First and foremost run it this summer and find what niggles you about it, especially if you now intend to to keep it long term in the uk you may decide a right hand drive conversion to be a priority as many do.

Before throwing a bucket  of money at it , have the chassis and bodywork checked over and any work required sorted then you can build on a solid foundation. 

It pays to speak to the engine specialist and get some prices and specs from them as there are varying stages of rebuild/upgrades. using it for a while  will give you a feel for the car and a much better idea of where you want to go with it.

Welcome to the forum and enjoy your car.

Brian

 

 

Thank you Brian, sound advice you have all basically said the same thing so I am going to do exactly that , just enjoy driving the car for now and look at the situation in the winter or next spring, thanks again phil

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23 hours ago, RogerH said:

Hi Phil,

welcome to the forum.

Where to start -  aaaarrrggghhh

be realistic in what you want.

You say to get the BHP up to UK level. The US cars were slightly underwhelming.  You will need more than a new cam.

As it is road going at the moment try to do jobs that do NOT take it off the roads for too  long.

 

If it was me I would take my time and make an extensive list. Do the priorities.

 

Good Luck

 

Roger

Cheers Roger thank you for your feedback, sound advice cheers phil

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23 hours ago, trchris said:

Hi Phil

Welcome Rogers beat me to it make a list of jobs and go from there there's plenty you can do to increase the torque on the engine but it will be costly if you go overboard with it , I'm sure others will give you some excellent advise on this. Are you going to change to right hand drive? and don't forget there's plenty on here to help you do a search or just ask 

Chris

Hey Chris thank you so much for the feedback it's very reassuring to know that were all in it together and it's great to have the knowledge of those that been down this road many times before, thanks again phil

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21 hours ago, Rob Salisbury said:

With regard to the engine, if you are still retaining carbs rather than converting to Pi, then get in touch with Chris Witor (Google), he mainly deals the T2000, 2.5 Saloons but what he doesn't know about the Triumph 6 pot engines isn't worth knowing!!  He has a whole wealth of knowledge about cylinder heads and cam shafts and a whole bunch of Pi stuff if that's the direction you hope to go.

Cheers Rob  

Cheers Rob thank you very much for your help and feedback, always great to have recommendations, thanks again phil 

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