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Tr4 Rear Axle seal replacement?


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A Sheet of gasket paper or A4 printing paper.  ?  
It has not got to be oil proof, just a spacing shim between two steel shims.

 

Peter W

Edited by BlueTR3A-5EKT
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Thin shims

You can buy packets of shim steel from your local welding /engineering supplier. Varying from 1.5 to 10 thou thick

The thin 2-3 Thou steel can be cut with scissors and holes punched with a hole punch

This gives you complete control

Hope this helps

MichaelH

Edited by MichaelH
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36 minutes ago, MichaelH said:

Thin shims

You can buy packets of shim steel from your local welding /engineering supplier. Varying from 1.5 to 10 thou thick

The thin 2-3 Thou steel can be cut with scissors and holes punched with a hole punch

This gives you complete control

Hope this helps

MichaelH

Excellent idea.

dirt cheap too.   https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/264292078489?var=563870784964&_trkparms=ispr%3D1&hash=item3d89091399:g:0BwAAOSwHnFVnUvE&amdata=enc%3AAQAGAAAA4NiTr8vmDxGJ1s8XLZ%2FtOPbwpkr1avHoRJZm6F8oCJHjaOFvmbk0KRJLrD%2Faa9EnNXUDp2LKZSzxWJACizJ4YGyPjpArEMtoleFsfZrkEc3SKuM0FbEYseOp%2BIdz6PkNKx1OZ%2FV5bqfx7tvngJBlSrXUUh4QnOEgmCKuHCzLEzTu1tSMxxKHYDLUthtUYckMTD7EWRrf7FmlHZX97ROfFZ1glmmrD561vBIjIEwEpr%2FgUkev0n%2FFwm3bT9tW4vuwoMiU1l7nipi6G0Pih9E0TFLFEjlcTGoTaT6lBLaDkMNd|tkp%3ABFBMirOV-49g

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You don't need to do it by making very thin bespoke shims - you can do it by juggling the available ones. 

For example with combinations of the 6, 8, 15.6 and 31 thou shims available you can make:

6, 8, 12, 14, 15.6, 16, 18, 20, 21.6, 22, 23.6, 24, 26, 27.6, 28, 29.6, 30, 31, 32, 33.6, 35.6, 37.6  etc etc. 

 

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Hello, and again my gratitude to all contributors.

I've ordered some shim steel - it never would have occurred to me. A very good suggestion. Hence I plan to carefully make what I need. As a backup to that, as I obviously have to pull the hubs again, I'll measure what I have to set the scene for any possible buying of the real shims. 

I located my micrometer and gave it a good clean and it came up very well. I didnt really understand how to use it, but I read my Automobile Engineering textbook dating from the early'60s, with the emphasis on Engineering, and this had a very clear section on the use of micrometers. I feel that if it such measurements could be done old-school prior to the digital age, then with a bit of effort I should be able to measure my existing shims.

Thanks

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi

I'm please to report, that despite a bit of the usual struggle, I got .005 and .004-and-a-bit on the axle end floats. The shim-steel DIY approach worked, but as RobH says, a hole punch is needed. I didnt have a hole punch, so was mucking about with Stanley knives and scissors, but generally failed to cut really clean holes. So, in short, the easiest solution is to accept a delay, measure the existing shims then purchase what new shims are needed.

I found it all do-able, but was thrown at first by each side of the hub affecting the other. However I got much faster and confident. The only real disaster was my lack of three hands when my vintage dial-gauge abruptly let go of its mount when I was adjusting it, and fell face down thus cracking the glass face. I expect a watch repairer can replace it.

So: My real thanks to all posters. The new axle seals are in and not too tricky, I've learned about dial gauges, micrometers and axle end-floats, and the entire braking system got a rebuild as one of several side projects.

I'll park this thread.  I'm now building up to starting the car and tuning it up after carbs rebuild, but in the meantime there are a few jobs to do, notably "service" items.

Thanks

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Sympathy with the cracked dial indicator glass face

Happened to me and I sent it back to the manufacturers agent (Mitutoyo) and they replaced the bit economically despite the fact that I have owned it for >30 years

so don't give up if the local watch maker can't repair it

MichaelH

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