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Laycock Clutch Assembly


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Thought I'd give this a shot....  Has anyone got a Layclock clutch assembly suitable for a refurb or which  can be used as a service exchange. I need the friction plate and the pressure plate assembly. I know they are like hens teeth but just thought someone may have the bits lying around at the back of the garage. If you have and they are surplus to requirement please send me a PM.

Many thanks.

TonyC

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1 hour ago, TonyC said:

Thought I'd give this a shot....  Has anyone got a Layclock clutch assembly suitable for a refurb or which  can be used as a service exchange. I need the friction plate and the pressure plate assembly. I know they are like hens teeth but just thought someone may have the bits lying around at the back of the garage. If you have and they are surplus to requirement please send me a PM.

Many thanks.

TonyC

Hi Tony,

may I ask why you want a Laycock clutch assembly?

 

Roger

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Thats because they are the best Roger, if you want the best fit the standard fitment. Nice to have you back in the ranks dear boy!

Cheers

Alan G

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Perhaps I am just getting old or my left leg/knee is giving up but I changed from a Borg as it was a pain having a heavy clutch in stop/start traffic. The Laycock is significantly lighter on the left leg

kc

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Why not buy an MX5?  Oh have I just used a "word" that's disallowed on this forum? LOL

BTW I was being very much tongue in cheek there!

Alan G

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13 hours ago, RogerH said:

Why not fit a servo ??

 

Roger

I did not know there was a servo upgrade kit available, Roger, do you have a link?

kc

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57 minutes ago, kcsun said:

I did not know there was a servo upgrade kit available, Roger, do you have a link?

kc

I have fitted a servo to a clutch on a 6 its only a case of altering the pipe work and a T in the vacuum line. Use any of the aftermarket servo kits and fit to the left hand foot well, you do have to relocate the washer bottle but I just put it down the front by the overflow bottle .

Stuart.

 

Tonys TR6 624.JPG

Edited by stuart
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Hi Roger,

A leading question. The clutch I have has been fitted by PO at resto circa 2005. 30K miles in I have changed the slave a couple of times due to leaks. Now I have the OD out and away for a rebuild and dropped the clutch assembly to check it.  There is still life in it but having read the many articles about clutch woes - Roger Williams books, Buckeye Triumph, and Brent Kiser (Purdue University) 'paper' 'Trials and Tribulations of TR6 clutches', I thought I would look at changing it.  Generally the original Laycock clutch assembly comes out on top.  It has the lowest actuating pressure and apart from the comfort that may bring it may also help prevent over stressing the hydraulics. I understood that Laycock clutches are no longer available as a new i.e. refurbed, item and can only be supplied 'service exchange', hence my post.

The upside of using the Borg and Beck assembly which I have is that I have huge quads on my left leg, the downside, the up and coming trip to a Scotch Whiskey distillery on Drive It Day with the Scottish group, means I have to drive back after the tour so won't be able to sample the delights, as the heavy clutch is just too much for my nearest and dearest (although I am working on it, of which Laycock is one option, sessions in the gym being the other).

That's it in a nutshell. Not the end of the world but just an effort to try and improve things a little. I'm getting old you know!

Thanks and stay safe.

TonyC

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Hi Tony,

that is all quite understandable.

I have a TR4A and know what you mean about a heavy clutch.

Back in 2015(ish) I fitted a laycock clutch cover and the difference  was barely noticeable. After a few problems I had to go in and sort out an issue by removing the GB. I ended up fitting whatever the latest incarnation of B&B clutch (it may have been Adelphi) with a steel bearing carrier. The clutch foot pressure dropped to the best it had ever been.  It is still going strong - but heavy compared t modern.

As I mentioned above have you considered fitting a servo for your good lady.

Or have you considered fitting the concentric clutch slave unit - as per modern cars. There are a number of kits to choose from.

Roger

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8 minutes ago, RogerH said:

Or have you considered fitting the concentric clutch slave unit - as per modern cars. There are a number of kits to choose from.

Roger

Not sure that one of those would reduce pedal pressure and theyre not an easy DIY fit.

Stuart.

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Hi
I wonder why it hasn't gotten around in England yet. The Sachs clutch from the Saab has become our standard. Sachs No. 3082100041.

Many greetings
Ralf

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45 minutes ago, Schnippel said:

Hi
I wonder why it hasn't gotten around in England yet. The Sachs clutch from the Saab has become our standard. Sachs No. 3082100041.

Many greetings
Ralf

Thanks. Being made in Germany it's got to be better than a lot of the other offerings on the market.

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On 1/20/2022 at 11:47 AM, stuart said:

Not sure that one of those would reduce pedal pressure and theyre not an easy DIY fit.

Stuart.

The benefit is a massiv reduction,

but indeed to make it DIY is a not easy job because of the dimension of the ingoing gear box shaft,

it has tractor dimensions and the common concentric clutch slaves are from cars.

Most of you know I made some of them, my post about is out there on the heap.

Edited by Z320
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I have fitted and used for twenty years a  laycock clutch and cover (new) with a Tilton annular release kit (inside gearbox) and yes fiddly to set up but a delight to use.

I have also fitted a clutch servo to a friends TR4 because of a dodgy left leg/foot and enabled him to drive for a few more years before health issues prevented him doing anything at all.

Regards Harry TR5N

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Hi folks,

just a quick update - found a Laycock clutch assembly ( new old stock) at TR Shop, thanks for the tip kc. Eye wateringly expensive but hey you can’t take it with you! I’ll do without the caviar for a couple of weeks. Added a few other goodies to the order, as you do, so will get into the re-build soon although won’t be able to test drive quite yet as up here in the frozen north we have lots of salt on the roads.

Thanks for all your input. Much appreciated. Stay safe.

TonyC

 

 

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The pressure plate is the key element to the force required.

You can use a B&B driven plate (or an AP uprated or Helix for that matter) with a Laycock cover. So you only need to hunt down a cover or try the Sachs for that matter.

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Hi Tony ans Alan,

what you can also do is to fit a 0.70" master instead the original 0.75" = 13 % less force (0.70²/0.75²),

ot fit a 0.625" master instead the original 0.75" = 31% less force (0.625²/0.75²).

I did that in 2 steps agianst all warnings before I fitted a concentric slave - and it worked.

On TR4 and 4A without any problem, on TR6 same attention is needed to avoid wasting way of travel.

An adjustable pushrod/s could be usefull. For example Tim D. did that on my recommendation.

Ciao, Marco

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37 minutes ago, Z320 said:

Hi Tony ans Alan,

what you can also do is to fit a 0.70" master instead the original 0.75" = 13 % less force (0.70²/0.75²),

ot fit a 0.625" master instead the original 0.75" = 31% less force (0.625²/0.75²).

I did that in 2 steps agianst all warnings before I fitted a concentric slave - and it worked.

On TR4 and 4A without any problem, on TR6 same attention is needed to avoid wasting way of travel.

An adjustable pushrod/s could be usefull. For example Tim D. did that on my recommendation.

Ciao, Marco

Yep I switched to a 0.625 master.  Works fine (tested in the 2000 miles of the round britain). You do need an adjustable pushrod and it does mean the clutch pedal is further up. But works great. I needed it as I have to use a stronger clutch cover to stop the clutch spinning when I run 7psi on the supercharger. 
tim

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2 hours ago, Z320 said:

Hi Tony ans Alan,

what you can also do is to fit a 0.70" master instead the original 0.75" = 13 % less force (0.70²/0.75²),

ot fit a 0.625" master instead the original 0.75" = 31% less force (0.625²/0.75²).

I did that in 2 steps agianst all warnings before I fitted a concentric slave - and it worked.

On TR4 and 4A without any problem, on TR6 same attention is needed to avoid wasting way of travel.

An adjustable pushrod/s could be usefull. For example Tim D. did that on my recommendation.

Ciao, Marco

I took all the play out of my 73 CR TR clutch linkage with a .70" fitted and I still had trouble with gear crunching so I went back  to the original O.75" master cyl. Problem gone and that was 30 years ago. It has never come back. The key is amount of fluid displaced??

Bruce.

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