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Hi,

 

I was wondering if a Cork og Silicone gasket for the oil sump exist? instead of the "paper" gasket everyone supplies 

I have concluded, that my sump do not seal tight against the block, as just about all bolt heads have a drip of oil on them and everything else including the uprated rear main seal are dry.

I am thinking that perhaps the sump has warped slightly around the holes, from overtightening over the years.

 

Do you fine chaps any info here... please let me know.:)

 

regards 

Niels Peter

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I went with a cork gasket and made the mistake of tightening to the published torque figures

big mistake as it’s too much as the soft gaskets deform too much. 
 

I went round the sump pan bolt holes as “dressed” them so they were all flat and used the thin gasket and welseal on all faces. 
seemed to work 

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I’m with Hamish. Firstly check the sump for straightness with a known steel edge.

Makes sure all bolt holes are dressed back into shape, they should have raised edges from the bolt side. Refinish with a ball peen hammer and suitably sized socket as a receiver if necessary. Check the whole thing again for straightness. Then and only then think about the gasket. 
The paper ones work fine. Coat the sump face and the corresponding gasket face with wellseal. Let tack off. Assemble and invert onto a known flat surface. Add weight and leave for 24 hrs. 
Then wellseal the block face, the exposed gasket face and assemble to the correct torque. If you can resist the temptation, leave for a good 48 hrs before running, much longer if you can. 
This worked for me for the first time after many years of leaks……I’m asking for trouble, but it is as dry as a bone, even after a good thrash of nearly 3000 miles around the Pyrenees.

Iain
 

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+ 1 

Mick Richards

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This works for me, 2 paper gaskets, stick one to the block, stick the other to the sump, apply a thin layer of grease to the mating surface of both and carefully torque up the bolts, the next time you need to remove the sump the 2 will part nicely ready  to re-use rather than having to scrape off the torn residues.

Cheers Rob 

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Thank you for the input :)

 

I believe the std gasket is what I will go for. Might also have something to do with finding a Cork gasket within EU.... 

 

3 hours ago, Rob Salisbury said:

This works for me, 2 paper gaskets, stick one to the block, stick the other to the sump, apply a thin layer of grease to the mating surface of both and carefully torque up the bolts, the next time you need to remove the sump the 2 will part nicely ready  to re-use rather than having to scrape off the torn residues.

Cheers Rob 

Rob,  if I understand correctly:  ...  Engine seen from top to bottom....    Block , gasket sealer , Gasket  --- Grease --- gasket , gasket sealer , sump ? 

 

23 hours ago, iain said:

I’m with Hamish. Firstly check the sump for straightness with a known steel edge.

Makes sure all bolt holes are dressed back into shape, they should have raised edges from the bolt side. Refinish with a ball peen hammer and suitably sized socket as a receiver if necessary. Check the whole thing again for straightness. Then and only then think about the gasket. 
The paper ones work fine. Coat the sump face and the corresponding gasket face with wellseal. Let tack off. Assemble and invert onto a known flat surface. Add weight and leave for 24 hrs. 
Then wellseal the block face, the exposed gasket face and assemble to the correct torque. If you can resist the temptation, leave for a good 48 hrs before running, much longer if you can. 
This worked for me for the first time after many years of leaks……I’m asking for trouble, but it is as dry as a bone, even after a good thrash of nearly 3000 miles around the Pyrenees.

Iain
 

Iain,  3,000miles?  now that is what I call a roadtrip! :)

 

Cheers 

Niels Peter

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1 minute ago, 62-tr4-DK said:

 

 

Rob,  if I understand correctly:  ...  Engine seen from top to bottom....    Block , gasket sealer , Gasket  --- Grease --- gasket , gasket sealer , sump ?

 

Cheers 

Niels Peter

Hi Niels or is it Peter? ..... yes that's what works for me, ...... got fed up with scraping bit of sealer and gasket off the pan and block years ago, the double gasket also helps with the sealing plus a small blob of RTV round each sump screw.

Cheers Rob  

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11 minutes ago, 62-tr4-DK said:

Thank you for the input :)

 

 

Iain,  3,000miles?  now that is what I call a roadtrip! :)

 

Cheers 

Niels Peter

These cars love being used as intended.
See last two TRaction for Wayne’s two part account of a brilliant event. Tr Rally Pyrenees. Also on Facebook LBL Rallies.

Iain

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9 minutes ago, Rob Salisbury said:

Hi Niels or is it Peter? ..... yes that's what works for me, ...... got fed up with scraping bit of sealer and gasket off the pan and block years ago, the double gasket also helps with the sealing plus a small blob of RTV round each sump screw.

Cheers Rob  

Thanks Rob,

Well actually my name is double barreled (Niels Peter) :)

think I will give it a go, but bear with me... RTV = liquid gasket?

 

3 minutes ago, iain said:

These cars love being used as intended.
See last two TRaction for Wayne’s two part account of a brilliant event. Tr Rally Pyrenees. Also on Facebook LBL Rallies.

Iain

Iain, i will definitely take a look. Yes I believe they drive better when regularly used. 

 

Thank you Gents!

 

Cheers

Niels Peter

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I concur about dressing back any burrs around the holes although TR sumps tend to be pretty robust. You alays had to do it on Pinto rocker gaskets to have any chance of sealing.

I have also found that the torque settings can be a bit high and you run the risk of the gasket splitting if you overtighten them. (More so if silicon gasket sealant is used which allows a bit of slipping) Watch the gasket as you get near to the torque setting - do it in stages. If it is out of the car allow the engine to stand on it overnight and before lifting and rechecking the torque.  Personally I prefer Hermetite Red (or Hylomar red as it seems to be called these days)

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. RTV = liquid gasket ? 

= blocked oil galleries when it migrates inside the sump.

Mick Richards 

 

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15 minutes ago, Motorsport Mickey said:

. RTV = liquid gasket ? 

= blocked oil galleries when it migrates inside the sump.

Mick Richards 

 

Nope just learn how to use it with a gasket 

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23 minutes ago, John Morrison said:

I'll hold your coat Mick.

John.

:lol: :lol: :lol: I'd trust Neil to know how to use it.

Mick Richards

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Is RTV a gasket substitute?

it suggests here it is  https://www.gluegun.com/blogs/news/what-does-rtv-stand-for

 

RTV Silicone Gasket is a singular component vulcanizing gasketing compound designed to provide reliable gaskets for mechanical assemblies. The product cures upon exposure to room temperature air and will form a tough yet flexible silicone rubber gasket.

This product resists weathering and aging, with the ability to withstand the thermal cycle without hardening or cracking. RTV Silicone Gasket can be used to replace most cut gaskets or any dressing. It’s typically applied in sealing panels, window plates or on high-temperature equipment like oven doors.

Edited by BlueTR3A-5EKT
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10 hours ago, BlueTR3A-5EKT said:

Is RTV a gasket substitute?

it suggests here it is  https://www.gluegun.com/blogs/news/what-does-rtv-stand-for

 

RTV Silicone Gasket is a singular component vulcanizing gasketing compound designed to provide reliable gaskets for mechanical assemblies. The product cures upon exposure to room temperature air and will form a tough yet flexible silicone rubber gasket.

This product resists weathering and aging, with the ability to withstand the thermal cycle without hardening or cracking. RTV Silicone Gasket can be used to replace most cut gaskets or any dressing. It’s typically applied in sealing panels, window plates or on high-temperature equipment like oven doors.

Thanks.. :-)

Cheers

Niels Peter

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Locktite 574 is also intended for sealing metal parts without use of gaskets. I used some last week (for the 1st time) on my Jeep Cherokee transfer box, having had to repair it. Unlike RTV it sets in the absence of air, rather than the presence of it.  

Bob

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  • 2 weeks later...

A bit late to this post, but regarding RTV as a gasket, a lot of "moderns" use only RTV and no gaskets. From my own personal experience last year I replaced the timing chain on my Renault Trafic van, the kit came with a tube of JB Weld RTV for the large tin chain cover. The cover was a bugger to get off, having been fitted from the factory with a similar RTV compound. 15000 miles later there are no leaks ( well at least not from the timing chain housing).

Also overhauled a gearbox for the same van last year, and again, no gaskets, only RTV on the joints.

Admittedly you don`t want loads of it oozing into the sump of your TR, so needs to be used sparingly, and I have a paper gasket and wellseal on my sump, but if a blob did detach and get in the oil I would expect the pump strainer would catch it, and if any small bits did get through then the oil filter should remove it I would have thought.

Ralph

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I've used RTV on the top rocker cover face to cork gasket and left to set. then light wipe of grease on the cork to head face. Cork stays stuck tot he cover ever time I want to take it off and by leaving the RTV to set (on something flat of course) over night you don't have the worry of excess going into the engine.

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I do similar, but other way round, I used Wellseal on the degreased cylinder head top face, to stick the gasket to it, then grease on the top face of gasket to seal to the cover. once pressed into shape, it is oil tight, even after many removals of the cover.

Bob

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