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Looking after Leaf Springs


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2 hours ago, iain said:

Hi H 

I use it as an alternative to the other rust proofing agents. It’s very simple to apply with a hand sprayer and can be used on all the components you mention. So far I’ve been very impressed. I have no connection to the company, but it’s worth looking at the videos on YouTube. It is very easy to use.

Iain

 

Cheers Iain will do

and HNY

 

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On 1/2/2022 at 4:49 PM, ed_h said:

My GT6 had plastic buttons installed in dimples between the leaves. This allegedly kept the leaves from directly rubbing.  No one has mentioned this, so maybe It's not very common.

Replacement buttons are available, but they are pretty easy to make.

http://bullfire.net/GT6/GT6-8/GT6-8.html

DSC07172a.JPG

Yes that button sits securely in a depression thumped into the spring leaf.

MG used ‘inter-leaf’ strips between the leaves to reduce friction/noise.   Not wide enough for a TR leaf spring though.   https://www.moss-europe.co.uk/interleaf-strip-per-metre-ahh7078m.html?assoc=112290

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1 hour ago, BlueTR3A-5EKT said:

MG used ‘inter-leaf’ strips between the leaves to reduce friction/noise.   Not wide enough for a TR leaf spring though.   https://www.moss-europe.co.uk/interleaf-strip-per-metre-ahh7078m.html?assoc=112290

The GT6 had the plastic buttons for all leaves except the top one.  I used a strip of nylon for that.   I'll bet the Moss stuff is the same or similar material.

Ed

DSC07179a.JPG

Edited by ed_h
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1 minute ago, ed_h said:

The Gat6 had the plastic buttons for all leaves except the top one.  I used a strip of nylon for that.   I'll bet the Moss stuff is the same or similar material.

Ed

DSC07179a.JPG

The MG stuff is getting on for 0.1” thick (2mm ish)

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3 hours ago, BlueTR3A-5EKT said:

The MG stuff is getting on for 0.1” thick (2mm ish)

I see.  So how many of those strips are in a spring?

Ed

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Following on from earlier, pccies of the leaf spring greaser/oiler?

John.1802593296_smallfileleafspgreaser.jpg.b1be8a11605cea5cfe546c347d50f739.jpg

696445903_smfileleafspgreaser..jpg.a0774b47f38c9d984566c250175a75bc.jpg

 

Quite clever, really as the screw end chisel bit, revolves in the thread so as to allow it to 'Spread' the leaves.

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9 hours ago, ed_h said:

I see.  So how many of those strips are in a spring?

Ed

One is clamped between each steel leaf, so on a 6 leaf spring there are 5

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Posted (edited)

Thinking about the article which says you can have a smoother drive with well maintained springs, if you imagine the spring seized or partially seized, with no or limited leaf movement, the drive might be very harsh as there would be limited suspension travel, and that would then promote oversteer.
 

Secondly, if the leaves can ‘interact’ properly as you corner, the spring will extend in length on that side, which is why the drop link saddle is present, push the axle rearwards a few degrees and introduce a measure of understeer or correct geometry for that car. Conversely on the other side, and apart from giving a smoother driving experience. Much the same effect as a link on a 3/4 link suspension set-up or the independent trailing arm on later cars. I have seen cars where the rear springs have sagged so much they are almost ‘concave’. A pig to drive I’d imagine! 

Kevin

Edited by boxofbits
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3 hours ago, BlueTR3A-5EKT said:

Deleted

Edited by Motorsport Mickey
On line chat wouldn't load.
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10 minutes ago, Motorsport Mickey said:

 

More years than I care to admit since I last spoke to Rubery Owen (now Owen Springs) And when engaged in an on line question forum 10 mins ago (ain't the internet marvellous ) the spring maker said

Actual copy of the on line chat

 

Question : Hi , back in the day it was recommended that leaf springs be oil lubricated between the leaves to help smooth motion and resist rusting. The counter argument was it caused the leaf to pick up grit and caused wear, which is correct ?

Hi Michael

Hi Dave, can you see my question ?

as far as i know there is no benefit in oiling between the leaves, some say to oil others say not to. We dont see the benefit of oiling between

Won't it help the leaves with anti corrosion ? I know the leaves are rubbing continuously rust build up ?

We dont believe that there is a benefit, but it wont hurt to add grease/oil, but it is personall choice

09:36

OK Dave, thanks for the info.

no problem thanks

 

So there you have it, the spring manufacturer doesn't care and doesn't see a requirement for it, do what you want you can't possibly be wrong.

Mick Richards

Edited by Motorsport Mickey
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I had to change the rear spring on my Vitesse a couple of years ago because the ends of the  upper leaves had worn almost half way through the leaves below. Remember on a Vitesse the spring is upside down. The resulting step stopped the leaves sliding over each other on larger bumps as well as weakening the spring leaves. Regular oiling may have prevented that wear, or at least slowed it. I have also seen cars with nylon inserts where the inserts have been ground away on the rusty leaves on which they are rubbing, again oiling might have slowed this.

Used to run leaf spring Land Rovers, and the first thing I did with a newly acquired one was to take them off road to get the springs "freed off", followed by lashings of old engine oil worked into the leaves and it transformed the ride quality.

If you oil it may collect grit, if you don`t oil it will certainly still get water and grit in between and rust into the bargain.

Ralph

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6 hours ago, BlueTR3A-5EKT said:

That's interesting.  They offer the buttons in nylon or rubber.  Nylon was my first thought in making the buttons, but finally used Delrin (acetal) because of its higher compressive strength with almost as good a lubricity.  It appeared that the original buttons, material unknown, failed in compression.

Ed

DSC07169a.JPG

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2 hours ago, Ralph Whitaker said:

I had to change the rear spring on my Vitesse a couple of years ago because the ends of the  upper leaves had worn almost half way through the leaves below. Remember on a Vitesse the spring is upside down. The resulting step stopped the leaves sliding over each other on larger bumps as well as weakening the spring leaves. Regular oiling may have prevented that wear, or at least slowed it. I have also seen cars with nylon inserts where the inserts have been ground away on the rusty leaves on which they are rubbing, again oiling might have slowed this.

Used to run leaf spring Land Rovers, and the first thing I did with a newly acquired one was to take them off road to get the springs "freed off", followed by lashings of old engine oil worked into the leaves and it transformed the ride quality.

If you oil it may collect grit, if you don`t oil it will certainly still get water and grit in between and rust into the bargain.

Ralph

I would agree with that as a general rule and a first hand observation from Ralph. You’ll get grit in between the leaves either way, but if it’s oiled at least the spring will work properly. It is also probably a good idea to spray a rubber lubricant around the spring shackles and location points, especially the front, regularly so that if the spring does need to come off the mounting points are not all seized solid.

Here is a suitable spray for bushes which is quite reasonable .

https://www.zoro.co.uk/shop/lubricants-and-chemicals/lubricants/rubber-care-silicone-free-lubricant-500ml/p/ZT1229818P?utm_source=google&utm_campaign=pla%2B|%2BLubricants %26 Chemicals&utm_term=ZT1229818P&utm_medium=pla_css_3&targetid=aud-807271041792:pla-1301914724091&loc_physical_ms=9045158&dev=m&gclid=Cj0KCQiA_c-OBhDFARIsAIFg3ewjGk0Xf6RdJjocysuehee8h-3DvdKjVdSutYaBSal9igGKJJ1DBMYaAjmwEALw_wcB

Kevin

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22 minutes ago, boxofbits said:

I would agree with that as a general rule and a first hand observation from Ralph. You’ll get grit in between the leaves either way, but if it’s oiled at least the spring will work properly. It is also probably a good idea to spray a rubber lubricant around the spring shackles and location points, especially the front, regularly so that if the spring does need to come off the mounting points are not all seized solid.

Here is a suitable spray for bushes which is quite reasonable .

https://www.zoro.co.uk/shop/lubricants-and-chemicals/lubricants/rubber-care-silicone-free-lubricant-500ml/p/ZT1229818P?utm_source=google&utm_campaign=pla%2B|%2BLubricants %26 Chemicals&utm_term=ZT1229818P&utm_medium=pla_css_3&targetid=aud-807271041792:pla-1301914724091&loc_physical_ms=9045158&dev=m&gclid=Cj0KCQiA_c-OBhDFARIsAIFg3ewjGk0Xf6RdJjocysuehee8h-3DvdKjVdSutYaBSal9igGKJJ1DBMYaAjmwEALw_wcB

Kevin

Re the buttons on the Spitfire and GT6 transverse rear spring.   My memory of selling those buttons as a spare from Triumph was that they were just hard rubber pellets.

good reading here.

https://raptorsmotorsport.com/old-man-emu-suspension/emu-dakar-leaf-springs

Edited by BlueTR3A-5EKT
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  • 3 weeks later...
On 1/2/2022 at 10:20 AM, iain said:

I have taken to using Lanoguard. Derived from sheep wool . . . ever seen a rusty field gate where sheep rub themselves?

Okay Iain, you've piqued my interest!  :D

Until today, I've been a fully signed up member of the Waxoyl Club: religiously slathering the TR with a healthy bucket-sized dollop every year prior to winter. But now, after browsing a few Lanoguard videos on Youtube, I'm intrigued.

I'm wondering, did you use Waxoyl (or something similar) before making the switch? If so, how did you go about shifting it prior to the Lanoguard application? (I'm guessing it's not a cheerful pastime, venturing into Hazmat suit and pressure washer territory? :unsure:)

Meanwhile in other news, waiting for the coffee to brew and browsing through a copy of Car Mechanic magazine the other day (1961 edition), I stumbled across this old 'Drevo Tape' advert in the classifieds.

Available from all good Halfords and Gamages stockists now. Just 32/6!

(Hmm . . . Gamages? Now what's a Gamages, anyone?)

 

Drevo.thumb.jpg.db53b6aef0d291ff5842e06314659aed.jpg

Deggers

 

Edited by Deggers
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Gamages of London was a well known department store that closed back in 1972.  If this is what is being referred to ? department stores used to dabble in many everyday products and especially if you lived "in the smoke" why not pick up leaf spring bondage bandages as you browsed through their motoring department. ? 

PS: Their name is now owned by a marketing firm and you'll find even wristwatches sold with the Gamages name on them, sadly nothing to do with their past.

Mick Richards

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34 minutes ago, Motorsport Mickey said:

Gamages of London was a well known department store that closed back in 1972.  If this is what is being referred to ? department stores used to dabble in many everyday products and especially if you lived "in the smoke" why not pick up leaf spring bondage bandages as you browsed through their motoring department. ? 

PS: Their name is now owned by a marketing firm and you'll find even wristwatches sold with the Gamages name on them, sadly nothing to do with their past.

Mick Richards

Bit like MG then?

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1 hour ago, Motorsport Mickey said:

. . . a well known department store that closed back in 1972. 

Ah, thank you Mick. A bit before my time.  :ph34r:

Growing up in Cornwall, we had Trago Mills (a similar behemoth). Dad and I would call in occasionally, often on the pretext of him needing a new drill bit or a pack of nails. And we'd come home with enough supplies to rival an Everest expedition: tools, wood, coffee, dog biscuits, enough Creosote to preserve HMS Victoria. I don't think there was anything Trago didn't sell.

Deggers

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17 hours ago, Deggers said:

Okay Iain, you've piqued my interest!  :D

Until today, I've been a fully signed up member of the Waxoyl Club: religiously slathering the TR with a healthy bucket-sized dollop every year prior to winter. But now, after browsing a few Lanoguard videos on Youtube, I'm intrigued.

I'm wondering, did you use Waxoyl (or something similar) before making the switch? If so, how did you go about shifting it prior to the Lanoguard application? (I'm guessing it's not a cheerful pastime, venturing into Hazmat suit and pressure washer territory? :unsure:)

Meanwhile in other news, waiting for the coffee to brew and browsing through a copy of Car Mechanic magazine the other day (1961 edition), I stumbled across this old 'Drevo Tape' advert in the classifieds.

Available from all good Halfords and Gamages stockists now. Just 32/6!

(Hmm . . . Gamages? Now what's a Gamages, anyone?)

 

Drevo.thumb.jpg.db53b6aef0d291ff5842e06314659aed.jpg

Deggers

 

Hi Deggars 

I took the body off the chassis in lockdown. I wanted to refresh the chassis after nearly 40 yrs. The chassis was ballasted primed, some small repairs and then waxoyled internally through some purpose drilled holes. The body was pressure washed clean, wiped off with white spirit were needed and then all reassembled. I wanted to leave it at that, but as I use the car I decided some protection was needed. I came across the Lanoguard stuff, checked it out and thought it looks and sounds so much easier to use, also removable with their own citrus based remover. So I had a go, it took less than 40 minutes to do the whole car with the supplied hand spray. The fact that it’s a natural product and does biodegrade is for me a plus point, I don’t mind cleaning the underneath once a year, checking it over touching up the paint and then reapplying if it’s this easy. The Lanoguard grease is also very good for brush application to awkward areas, spring shackle etc. So far two winters and 3000 plus miles of motoring and it’s looking good. No affiliation just a happy user who keeps sheep!

Iain

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On 1/20/2022 at 4:38 PM, iain said:

So far two winters and 3000 plus miles of motoring and it’s looking good. No affiliation just a happy user who keeps sheep!

:) 

Thanks Iain, all good information. Now added to the "Works List", and something to consider for next winter.

Cheers, Deggers

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On 1/20/2022 at 8:17 AM, Motorsport Mickey said:

Gamages of London was a well known department store that closed back in 1972.  If this is what is being referred to ? department stores used to dabble in many everyday products and especially if you lived "in the smoke" why not pick up leaf spring bondage bandages as you browsed through their motoring department. ? 

PS: Their name is now owned by a marketing firm and you'll find even wristwatches sold with the Gamages name on them, sadly nothing to do with their past.

Mick Richards

Remember Gamages well. As we lived 'in the smoke', I was taken there each year as a child to meet Father Christmas. Oddly, it was near Hatton Garden; not exactly the retail centre of London. There was a time when every self respecting town would have a department store selling a wide range of products (Kingston - Bentalls, Sutton - Shinners, Guildford - Army & Navy). All long gone.

Using lanolin seems almost obvious once you think about it. I suppose the challenge is getting it into an applicable formula. In the past have used it in a compound to help preserve leather bookbindings. 

Miles

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