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I need to buy a CO2 monitor to help with the air inside the house. I am looking for a small unit which will be as easy to read as a clock. I need to place it near the old boiler and near the oil fired AGA. I am sure that I had a small gauge last year but I can not find anything. It is surprising how many other lost tools that have turned up during the search.

Now that the colder weather is here, we are having some headaches  etc. The heating/hw is on,  it seems sensible to monitor the kitchen and other rooms nearby. Can anyone recommend a supplier preferably in Lewes , Sussex or a major store with a local branch.

Thanks

Richard & B

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All combustion appliances like log burners need an alarm in the room but I think they are CO  (no 2) and just “go off” when an excess is monitored rather than a numerical reading of the conc. which would need calibration I would suggest.

so shop carefully  

 

 

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As Hamish says - Carbon monoxide not dioxide.  I have one with a bargraph display which seems OK (and which has never displayed above zero, thank goodness) . 

COm.jpg.a6ff946392b8f8196e7c2005349a037a.jpg  

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We have exactly the one shown by Rob. Not bought from Amazon as I won't buy from that tax avoiding and high street/bricks and mortar retailer destroying entity. I think I got ours from Dyas when they had it on offer.

B&Q have that one showing on their website at £23, link: - https://www.diy.com/departments/fireangel-co-9dq-wireless-carbon-monoxide-alarm-with-7-year-battery/193503_BQ.prd   

and a simpler one at £20, link: - https://www.diy.com/departments/fireangel-co-7xq-wireless-carbon-monoxide-alarm-with-7-year-battery/261146_BQ.prd

I see that Homebase also have the simpler version at £18: https://www.homebase.co.uk/fireangel-carbon-monoxide-alarm/12814431.html

Edited by Rod1883
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Hamish is quite right , it is carbon monoxide alarm you need for domestic boilers ,fires etc,  

Most are just alarms that go off, so the one above suggested by Rob looks good. The local fire brigade fitted Fireangel devices under a safer homes schemes, so I would think they are reliable.

Brian

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2 hours ago, stillp said:

There was a post on a Facebook group from a woman who'd disconnected the battery in her CO alarm because the constant beeping was giving her headaches...

Pete

You couldn’t make it up, could you.:o

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2 hours ago, stillp said:

There was a post on a Facebook group from a woman who'd disconnected the battery in her CO alarm because the constant beeping was giving her headaches...

A potential candidate for the next Darwin awards then ?

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25 minutes ago, john.r.davies said:

Sigh.

Please tell us, ntc, who is "qualified" to service a CO monitor? 

JOhn

Let me try to help you the items were the boiler and cooker and CO 2 is not the right one, read his post and headaches are the least of his worries 

Edited by ntc
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6 minutes ago, ntc said:

CO monitor is not the right one

So what would you monitor for Neil, if not CO ?  You seem to be reading something in Richard's post which eludes the rest of us. 

 

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6 hours ago, ntc said:

All pointless if the items have not been serviced by a qualified person 

No, ntc, the above is what you said.   You did not mention until your second post, matters that had already been raised.    

Please tell us, this is important and we need to know, who is "qualified" to service a CO monitor?   Your expertise as an expert adviser is most valued.

John

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3 minutes ago, ntc said:

Both the boiler and cooker must be serviced by a qualified person they would check the levels and decommission them by law if faulty and no monitor would help you in a inquest 

I think most of us will be aware of the primary need for regular boiler checks. Nonetheless, the Health and Safety Executive "strongly recommends" the use of CO alarms as an additional precaution. Which was why the OP was asking for advice on which one to buy.

I'm not sure I'd be too concerned about the inquest, if I was the subject of it.

Nigel

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So the CO monitor should be checked by a gas engineer?  Well, CO is a gas, and it is inflammable so good guess!  Perhaps you would recommend a gas engineer with this particular expertise?

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The Fireangel device as pictured in Rob's post above is what we have freestanding, in our living room, to monitor the CO level as we have a small log burner. Our chimney sweep checks that we have this in place and that the test button works as part of his assessment and includes this on the certificate. The Fireangel device is, imho, therefore fine for a domestic setting - currently £23 from B&Q

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31 minutes ago, ntc said:

Both the boiler and cooker must be serviced by a qualified person they would check the levels

 It's not unknown for faults to develop between safety checks.  If you have the monitor you might avoid the need for an inquest. 

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21 minutes ago, RobH said:

 

 It's not unknown for faults to develop between safety checks.  If you have the monitor you might avoid the need for an inquest. 

I agree Rob but because of what Richard said in his post I would get both appliances checked asap then buy a monitor 

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 Thanks for all the replies. It looks as if I need a monitor to cover both CO and CO2 and we are hoping that we can find a warning unit that works well. I know how to buy one but what I am looking for is resounding approval from a current owner who is fully satisfied with the  monitor over a few years. It is useful to ask your friends on the TR forum who usually have no sales interest.

I am currently waiting for the technical department at Worcester Bosch to come back to me with some information. If any one has a top quality unit please let me know.

thanks Richard & B

 

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Acute CO poisoning is very obvious: nausea, retching, headache, and it's unlikely that anyone would fail to be aware, if awake. The danger is if it comes on when asleep. But no-one has suggested a bedside alarm. Peter

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You don't really need anything to measure CO2 Richard. That isn't a hazard outside of confined spaces like man-holes.  The long term exposure limit for working environments is 5000ppm over 8 hours.  The usual ambient concentration is circa 400ppm. Your house is going to seem unbearably stuffy long before you get to a dangerous amount. 

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