Jump to content

Fitting Stainless Steel Exhaust


Recommended Posts

Hi all, 
I am in the process of fitting a new stainless steel exhaust to my ‘58 3A. I have fitted a new support bracket and bushes in front of the chassis box which is clamping the joint nicely and holding everything firm. 
Getting the clamp in place where the two box sections come together was a faff but I have managed it and the rear support was easy enough. 
All of that done I am not convinced that the exhaust won’t still knock on the rear of the chassis box section. Has anyone done anything else to make the system more rigid so as not to knock on the chassis?

Mark

Link to post
Share on other sites

The exhaust centre mount is always a challenge.  Fitting the later design that attaches to the gearbox mounting rather than the chassis means the exhaust will move with the gearbox but it does stay more rigidly positioned.


many of the replacement exhaust systems have the first box incorrectly positioned on the pipe so the silencer  front corner hits the chassis 

see this previous thread with photos.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

My exhaust  is clamped at the gearbox flange and then again at the centre mounting by the handbrake.  The latter mounting has rubber bushes which offer a degree of flex.  Where the pipe passes through the cruciform I have crushed it ever so slightly oval to increase the clearance to the chassis and thus far (fingers crossed) it  hasn't hit the chassis or fractured the exhaust pipe.  It is then hung from a flexible strap just before the rear axle and again aft of the single silencer box.

Rgds Ian

Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried to use the original style clamp/support but it was a waste of time as the clamp part was never going to clamp the joint tight enough. I ditched that and followed Stuarts advice and used the later TR4 support.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

+1

It holds the pipe firmly to the gearbox, so you don't need the bell housing support, & with careful alignment you can get it through the cruciform without it touching the sides.

Bob.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the Tourist Trophy twin box system with the TR4 support at the gearbox mount and the standard hanging strap at the rear.  It looks as though it should rattle on the holes on the center box of the chassis, but in practice it has been OK.

As Peter said, the first silencer box is a tad too long and is very close the the rearmost part of the floor of the car, but again it doesn`t touch in use.

I have all new engine and gearbox mounts which helps control the movement of the engine in the chassis, might be a different story with older mounts, especially the gearbox mount if it has gone Squidgy from years of being soaked in oil.

Ralph

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Hi Mark

 

I have just finished my engine rebuild and will be fitting it the chassis over the weekend. I will be fitting phoenix stainless road manifold and converting to alternator. Are you using any form of heat shield on exhaust to protect carbs and or alternator. I am struggling to decide between tape of plate heatshield or is it required?.

Any thoughts on this would be very welcome

Cheers

Adrian

Link to post
Share on other sites

I did make a heat shield for my car, my local tr owning friend who also has the Phoenix manifold & alternator has no heat shield & has had no problem.

Bob

Edited by Lebro
Link to post
Share on other sites

I cooked my alternator ( well actually it was a dynamator) with a Phoenix S/S extractor on my 4, so fitted a heat shield which I got from Revington - having seen how simple it was, I will make my own one next time.

I really don't like wrapped manifolds - they look horrible in my view although they undoubtedly work, albeit some people have reported severe corrosion underneath the wrap over time.

I don't recall anyone having fuel vaporisation in the carbs from a S/S manifold so I don't think that's an issue

Cheers Rich

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are some photos of my heatshield.  It bolts to the front exhaust manifold stud and the inlet manifold (which is a TR4a one).  Originally the top angle bracket was made of aluminium but that fatigued across the bend line so its replacement is steel.  The alternator is a small 40 amp Kubota Denso item.

Rgds Ian

 

IMG_3127.jpeg

IMG_3128.jpeg

IMG_3129.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Back in 1962, the Works' TR4 Rally cars were fitted with a heat shield to protect the dynamo from the 4-branch exhaust.

4VC still had the shield in place when I bought the car 52 years ago.

The car was re-built in 1990-1993 by Revington,  and the same shield was fitted to protect the alternator which I had requested be fitted in place of the dynamo.

When Neil was fettling 6VC in about 1995, having brought the car back from the USA, he fitted an alternator - but not a heat shield.  Whoops - he cooked the alternator!

Whish is why he offers a shield.  But it's not difficult to make your own - just a sheet of tinplate will do the job (that's what 4VC still has in place).

Ian Cornish

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/18/2021 at 8:55 PM, rcreweread said:

Adrian - try these

Hi Rich, can you still get at the rear bearing on the dynamo to lubricate it? I read on this forum years ago that the rear bearing is the biggest weakness of the dynamo so needs regular lubrication. 

Mick

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Mick Forey said:

Hi Rich, can you still get at the rear bearing on the dynamo to lubricate it? I read on this forum years ago that the rear bearing is the biggest weakness of the dynamo so needs regular lubrication. 

Mick

As its only likely to need a drop of lube once a year if that then just remove and refit the shield after.

Stuart.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I went for a quilted heat shield. More due to having a bored afternoon than a creating design spec !! Using exhaust wrap. 
after the previous one cracked and had become brittle due to being fastened to the manifold

CDBDB2FC-06A3-4C8A-8918-F37A78D90970.jpeg

447EE530-8400-4B49-A93E-685825B6D106.jpeg

2E26FCC3-4813-4640-804A-A0EB451598E2.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Evening all, I have managed a couple of hours in the garage and started fitting the phoenix manifold and can already see a couple of issues, first will be grinding down the flange in various locations to allow the inlet manifold to also fit. However my question for tonight is.. How close can the break pipe be to the manifold (see photo} there is currently about a half inch gap, is that likely to cause any braking issues due to heat tx into break fluid. 

Any thought again greatfuly received. 

Adrian

IMG_20211124_191915.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Adrian Fuller said:

Evening all, I have managed a couple of hours in the garage and started fitting the phoenix manifold and can already see a couple of issues, first will be grinding down the flange in various locations to allow the inlet manifold to also fit. However my question for tonight is.. How close can the break pipe be to the manifold (see photo} there is currently about a half inch gap, is that likely to cause any braking issues due to heat tx into break fluid. 

Any thought again greatfuly received. 

Adrian

IMG_20211124_191915.jpg

Adrian - I think that is probably a bit too close for comfort - also, just checked on my TR4, and switch/T piece is fitted a different way round so it's my switch which is closer to the manifold but so far it seems to have survived OK.

Couple of photos of my switch arrangement for info.

Cheers Rich

IMG_0723.jpg

IMG_0722.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a couple of pressure switches fail in that position so changed to a mechanical switch on the pedal box. It has the advantage that the brake lights illuminate much sooner too. 

Edited by Drewmotty
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Please familiarise yourself with our Terms and Conditions. By using this site, you agree to the following: Terms of Use.