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Having removed the sump to see how mucky it was as the car had been standing for 25 years prior to being recommissioned 3 years ago.
It wasn’t too bad considering.
I think the mesh filter could do with a clean. I was thinking of using brake cleaner?
The crank etc looks a bit grainy is it advisable to clean in situ as far as practical before putting the sump back on, and if so using what ?
Many thanks.
Phil

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I would not clean the crank Phil, new engine oil will do that over time.

But “feel” each con rod for excessive play and certainly the crack end float. 

You will need to decide how far you want to go, before you know you do a full recondition.
Example: shells and thrust washers could be replaced in situ.

Brake cleaner or petrol will work fine on the filter, followed by blowing clear with compressed air.

Choices, choices.

Cheers,
Waldi

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Thanks Waldi,

Just reading an old post 2007 re the negative effects of flushing oils / additives.

I think I'll clean the sump, mesh filter and then refill with a new spin off filter, run for 500 miles and do it again.

Phil

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5 minutes ago, Phil H 4 said:

Thanks Waldi,

Just reading an old post 2007 re the negative effects of flushing oils / additives.

I think I'll clean the sump, mesh filter and then refill with a new spin off filter, run for 500 miles and do it again.

Phil

+1. And spin the engine over with the plugs out before starting to make sure you haven't lost oil pump priming.

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20 hours ago, Andy Moltu said:

Put the sump in the dish washer.

Just don't get caught!

If you want to see Xmas I'd suggest cleaning it with Gunk and warm water!

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10 minutes ago, PodOne said:

If you want to see Xmas I'd suggest cleaning it with Gunk and warm water!

I'm with Andy on this. Take it round his house and use his dishwasher - make sure his wife is out though.

 

Roger

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After 25 years stood I'd do as Waldi suggests: fit new main and b/e shells and check end-float/TWs, they are likely to be corroded. New shells will help crank wear. Peter

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15 hours ago, RogerH said:

I'm with Andy on this. Take it round his house and use his dishwasher - make sure his wife is out though.

 

Roger

I did omit to mention that was a once only action. A remarkable act of keeping a straight face when she couldn't figure out the odd smell and black deposits in the dish washer. Fortunately cleared itself after a couple of cycles before she had managed to buy a new one!

The 4a sump went in the dishwasher at work at the weekend wit no risk of reprimand!

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39 minutes ago, BlueTR3A-5EKT said:

A view of a street rainwater drain in Cannes. 

CC7459E3-18FD-4240-A703-1909EF14C067.jpeg

Yep and unbelievable that this is endorsed by a mod .Warning to all it is illegal and should be reported 

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As Pete says, If the shells and thrusts haven't been replaced recently it is going to be worth renewing them. They should wear out long before the crank does.

This allows a visual inspection of the crank journals and the measurement of the end float while you are in there.

And don't forget to use degreaser on the sump before putting it in the dishwasher!:D

 

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1 hour ago, ntc said:

Warning to all it is illegal and should be reported 

I take it you never wash your oily hands in the sink then Neil, nor ever launder oily overalls? :unsure:

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27 minutes ago, RobH said:

I take it you never wash your oily hands in the sink then Neil, nor ever launder oily overalls? :unsure:

You should not have oily hands and your slap dash if your overalls are ;)

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Did I say pour your used oil down the drain?

Perhaps some are fortunate to have someone else to get their hands and overalls dirty? Or perhaps tossing your vinyl gloves into the bin and then on into landfill doesn't count.

Perhaps one might washing your hands after apply your moisturiser (or barrier cream as it's sold to the macho) will put as much petroleum products into the sewer as giving a final wash to a de-greased sump.

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Having referred to the Haynes and Workshop Manual and watched a few videos, I'm I think set to check and change the Thrust washers as advised.

Remember i'm a novice so be kind !

I have purchased a dial indicator with a magnetic base - pic attached.

The workshop manual states the crankshaft end float is to be between 0.1524 and 0.2032mm

Using the dial that measures at 0.01mm increments as I understand it the dial should read between 15 and 20 on the outer scale, with the existing thrust washers in place.

If it reads more than 20 on the dial ( 0.2032) appropriate oversized thrust washers will be required to reduce the movement to within the specified tolerance.

In respect of tolerance, is it better to be on the lower or upper end of the scale?

Guidance - direction gratefully received.

Thanks Phil

 

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 ..

Edited by Motorsport Mickey
spelling
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9 hours ago, Phil H 4 said:

Having referred to the Haynes and Workshop Manual and watched a few videos, I'm I think set to check and change the Thrust washers as advised.

Remember i'm a novice so be kind !

I have purchased a dial indicator with a magnetic base - pic attached.

The workshop manual states the crankshaft end float is to be between 0.1524 and 0.2032mm

Using the dial that measures at 0.01mm increments as I understand it the dial should read between 15 and 20 on the outer scale, with the existing thrust washers in place.

If it reads more than 20 on the dial ( 0.2032) appropriate oversized thrust washers will be required to reduce the movement to within the specified tolerance.

In respect of tolerance, is it better to be on the lower or upper end of the scale?

Guidance - direction gratefully received.

Thanks Phil

 

IMG_7718.jpg

Normal thrust washers will take up the slack. Best to have the float at the minimum, gives you more wear before it gets out of limits.

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Phil,
as John indicates, normal washers may be sufficient. Remove the old washers, measure them and compare with the new washers. In my case only the “active” washer which takes the thrust from the clutch (pedal) force was worn and replaced; 

Waldi

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Be careful not to set the end float below the minimum.

If too tight, as the engine gets hot the, thrusts can pick up and cause damage.

You can mix and match standard and oversize thrusts to get it within tolerance. 

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