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Having set up the shimms crank and camshaft sprockets I notice that the manual suggests using DAG colloidal graphite and soaking the cam end bearing in it when warm. Is this required on the original bearing cap whick I have cleaned with panel wipe? . I have used lashings of cam lube but dag is obviously different. 

 

Thanks in advance for any suggestios

 

 

 

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When fitting a new camshaft and followers ALWAYS use the lube material they suggest (or supply in some cases), no matter what any manual or previous experience tells you otherwise works.

If you don't and the camshaft looses a lobe or seizes within a short time frame the camshaft suppliers will swear blind it's because you didn't follow their lubrication instructions.

Mick Richards

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Hi after too many hours setting the valve timing for my Newman PH1 cam I believe I have it as close as I am going to get it. Do the following figures look OK. Max lift on cam no1 is achieved at 111 deg with no movement down until 116 deg. Cam lift @TDC =0.040“ @10 deg ATDC= 0.060". I have tried moving camshaft chainwheel and flipping it which only takes readings further away from spec on Newman cam spec sheet below. Are these figures acceptable or am I missing something?.

 

Thanks in advace

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Eventually contacted Newman cams best figures I could get were approximatly 97deg 106 or 113. They were very quick to respond and put me in touch with a very knowledge chap who agreed that best figure would be 106 cam rocking as this also gives 57" a Tdc. So after many days this is what I am going with... Not sure if this does anything to ignition timing but will deal with that when I get there. 

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Questions just don't stop. I am now fitting narrow belt pulley kit and thought I should just confirm that I still use the oil deflector {no 79 moss plate} after the carnkshart chain wheel and do I just use bearing tool to fit the collar onto narrow bel pulley as it it a "good" fit. See photo below 

Thanks

All

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it never needs to come off again so I would have thought a drop of Loctite 270 wouldn't hurt.

A suggestion:  Once you have turned the engine to TDC and trial fitted the pulley, mark off the position of TDC on the outside of the pulley where it aligns with your timing case pointer.  Then remove the pulley and cut or score a series of perpendicular lines at ten degree intervals around the perimeter either side of TDC with a hacksaw with (I would suggest) a deeper one for TDC that you can fill with white paint.  It makes the subsequent task of setting the timing that much easier.

Oh and yes, I did still fit the oil thrower (deflector) inside the timing cover with the convex side facing away from the engine and towards the oil seal.

Rgds Ian

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Yes, you still need the oil deflector, & yes, just press the sleeve onto the pulley. A press is ideal, otherwise a vice, or just drift it on , keeping it straight as it goes.

Bob.

P.S.  Agree with Ian about timing marks, I put a series of grooves in mine - 0°, then 5°, 10°, 15°, 20° 25°, & 30° I made the 0,10,20 & 30 grooves longer than the inbetween ones.

Edited by Lebro
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To avoid parallax error I have bent the pointer down so that the tip is only a half a mm or so above the edge of the pulley.

Rgds Ian

PS having identified TDC I marked my pulley when it was off the engine.  I made a cardboard template the same diameter as the pulley and marked it up using my camshaft timing protractor.  It was an easy job to transfer the marks to the pulley.

Edited by Ian Vincent
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From the TR2-3A service manual:

"Fit the chain tensioner to it's pin and secure with washer and split pin. Screw in timing cover support bolt to the engine plate and fit the oil deflector to the crankshaft so that the raised edge faces the timing cover"

I used a fibre washer on the support bolt.

Bob.

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Clearly that is the right answer. As is taking lots of photos as you take things apart, (and put them back together). 

Rgds Ian

Edited by Ian Vincent
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