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TR6 Clutch Action


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I have a 1973 CR series car. I recently replaced the clutch slave cylinder as a previous owner had put a bolt into the bleed screw position rather than a bleed screw. Since fitting the replacement slave cylinder and bleeding it the clutch has to be depressed right to the floor to disengage the clutch. The slave cylinder bracket is on the engine side of the rear end plate, it is the original slave pushrod and appears to be moving the clutch arm far enough ( when someone depresses the pedal ). It worked perfectly before replacement of the slave cylinder which looks identical to the original and was supplied by Moss. I am concerned that the pushrod appears to be very close to being pushed from the cylinder. Any assistance would be gratefully received.

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Hello,

have you a name.

I assume you have the slave cylinder attached as per the Moss WebCat         clutch

The bracket #29 fits on the rear of the GB flange.

It could be that the taper pin on the  cross shaft has sheared - this will reduce the bearing movement significantly.

Have you got the slave bleed nipple at the 12-o-clock position - to get all the air out.

Are all the holes and pins in the linkages in very good condition.

 

Roger

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Hi Roger, Thanks for the prompt reply. My name is Mike. I am sure that I have fitted the bracket exactly as per the parts manuals as I did not move this when fitting the replacement slave cylinder. The bleed screw is at the 12 o'clock position. Push rod holes are good as is the hole in the clutch arm. It worked perfectly prior to fitting the replacement slave.

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50 minutes ago, MJATR6 said:

Hi Roger, Thanks for the prompt reply. My name is Mike. I am sure that I have fitted the bracket exactly as per the parts manuals as I did not move this when fitting the replacement slave cylinder. The bleed screw is at the 12 o'clock position. Push rod holes are good as is the hole in the clutch arm. It worked perfectly prior to fitting the replacement slave.

Hi Mike, 

A bit of a faff but is it worth refitting the old cylinder again and using the bleed nipple from the new one to see if it works better, as maybe the new one isn't right in some way? 

How come you are using the original push rod, did it not come with a new one? 

What happens if you pump the pedal a few times, does it work better? 

Is the cylinder mounted on the engine side of the mounting bracket or the gearbox side? 

Gareth

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Hi Gareth, The old slave was quite corroded on the inside but I suppose I could try and get a rebuild kit and try it. The replacement cylinder did not come with a new pushrod. Have not tried pumping the pedal other than when bleeding it. The cylinder is mounted from the rear of the car into the bracket which is bolted to the engine side of the gearbox. What I do not understand is that it was working perfectly other than I could not bleed it to change the fluid.

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That's why I hate reproduction parts. There are subtle differences between the repro parts and the originals that are hard to spot. The inside of the old cylinder might be corroded but is the working section of it's bore OK? If so  can you swap over the bleeder nipple and reuse it?

If the working section of the bore is corroded I'd consider sending the old cylinder off to be resleeved .

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I suspect it is just bleeding. For some reason I have found an initial bleed frustratingly difficult on the TR6. Once it is done it isn't a problem but that first one to get all the air out is a pain.

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6 hours ago, John McCormack said:

I suspect it is just bleeding. For some reason I have found an initial bleed frustratingly difficult on the TR6. Once it is done it isn't a problem but that first one to get all the air out is a pain.

Also find this sometimes. I have a 2500 TC saloon which has pretty much the same system.  Last time I had to change the slave I had to do it with the slave unmounted and placed above the master to allow the air out. Still took a lot of pumping. 

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Hi Mike.

Sorry I can't help, but if you see other recent posts I am also having serious clutch hydraulic problems.

This is the best place to get answers to your questions.

When you fix your problem, please post what your problem was. 

Thank you,

Mick. 

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I find on most cars slave cylinder bleeding, is make sure the piston is fully retracted and put a cable tie on to make sure it is fully retracted, that makes the volume in the cylinder very small and is easy to get the last air out.

John

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1 hour ago, Tim D. said:

  Last time I had to change the slave I had to do it with the slave unmounted and placed above the master to allow the air out. Still took a lot of pumping. 

I also had this problem a few years ago at Classic LeMans. An elderly chap had no effective clutch. The slave looked as if it was leaking.

I took it off and fitted new seals and then refitted the slaved. It was not possible to bleed the devil.

So I took the slave off and bleed it above the M/C and then refitted it.  Perhaps a suction bleeder would do the trick!!

Interestingly the elderly chap sent an email to somebody else thanking them for all their efforts :wacko:

 

Roger

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Maybe check the measurements.  Someone posted here that the movement of the pushrod needs to be 16mm, sounds about right to me.  Flip the dust cap and measure diameters of old one versus new one, there are variations out there. 

Another thought, the TR6 is a self adjusting type. There should be a spring inside the slave, this is to take up the slack. (Also helps to wear out the thrust bearing faster.)  So when you fitted the new one you should have had to push against that spring in order to fit the pin.

During my recent hassles (it turned out to be master cylinder), I found a post on a USA site suggesting moving the entire slave towards the back of the car by using old oversize nuts as spacers (needed longer bolts of course).  No harm trying that, just wiggle it to make sure its not loading the clutch pressure.

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4 hours ago, Z320 said:

Reading this and another TR forum clutch bleeding problems and not proper working is only a 6 cylinder problem......

Can be an issue on the TR2 with Lockheed hydraulics. The pipes come out of the back of the m/c and go up into a loop, creating an air bubble trap. But it is the 6 I found the biggest pain.

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Thanks to everyone who has replied. This afternoon I rebuilt the old slave cylinder with a brand new Lockheed kit which I had. Will try and find time later this week to fit it and will let you know the result. Many thanks . Mike

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Hope it works and turns out to be a crappy aftermarket part that was the issue. 

Gareth

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Since 1985, I've seen so many times, hydraulic clutches not properly bleed on Triumphs, I've lost the count.

The last time was only a couple of days ago : the owner tried 5 times before to get a correct result, by sucking from the csc bleed nipple.

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14 minutes ago, Chris59 said:

Since 1985, I've seen so many times, hydraulic clutches not properly bleed on Triumphs, I've lost the count.

The last time was only a couple of days ago : the owner tried 5 times before to get a correct result, by sucking from the csc bleed nipple.

Hi Chris so what's the top tips to getting rid of the air?

Thanks 

Andy

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I had trouble getting the air out of mine, but I realised after a lot of pumping and refilling the reservoir, that the slave had been fitted so the bleed nipple was orientated the wrong way and it left air in the system. Turning the slave 180 degrees and it bled fairly easily. 

Gareth 

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Oddly only had issues with my triumph saloon. TR6 was straight forward and have changed both master and slave cylinder about 5 times in the last few months while playing with different master cylinder bores. 

Tim

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Yes, bleed screw to the top.

If you can't suck (or push, either with a syringe), you can hold the clutch pressed by forcing the clutch lever with a pair of strong pliers, or remove the slave cylinder, both to avoid clutch back pressure on the hydraulic system.

 

Sometimes, bleeding is a matter of patience !

 

PS : I hope you understand what I mean, I'm not the best at speaking English.

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2 minutes ago, Tim D. said:

Oddly only had issues with my triumph saloon.  

Tim

Mmmmmh, the famous curve of the rigid pipe at the top of the CMC : a fantastic air trap :lol:

Edited by Chris59
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1 minute ago, Chris59 said:

Mmmmmh, the famous curve of the rigid pipe at the top of the CMC : a fantastic air trap :lol:

:D

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