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16 hours ago, Teher said:

Last achievement strongly reflecting the amateur craftsmanship but, all the same, very practical… 

My co-pilot and I often ride with helmets for obvious aesthetic reasons… and also and above all because, except to have the two side-screens in place, the TR2 and 3 are a festival of drafts… :wacko:

Nevertheless, there are times when the helmets are at rest and I then install them on the small seats that my older children now refuse to use on the false pretext that they cannot fit their seat and their long legs in a space of 1000 cm ! :rolleyes:

As I wish to avoid the Bolide the humiliation too often reserved for TRs by their aging owners, which consists in adopting a driving rhythm that by the nuance that characterizes me, I would qualify as "phlegmatic", in other words, devoid of any sportiness, I force myself to adopt a rhythm that is to say the least sustained and inevitably, my two beautiful helmets begin to dance the jig until they settle down in a very inconsistent way and at the risk of being irreparably damaged, between the seats mounting brackets and the tunnel… :(

Today's rally pilots use nets to store their helmets and I guess in the old days the technique to prevent them from wandering dangerously around the cockpit and having them on hand at all times must have been the same as it is today. ... Anyway, I imagined that it had to be so and undertook a highly "crappy" but very practical realisation !:blink:

Tried with an Ikéa provision net, the first realization turned out to be rather disappointing and quite frankly pathetically grotesque ... Also, I had to find a more "authentic" net… I then had the idea of using the helmet nets used by the military to slip camouflage bands or branches into them. ;)

A thin branch of reed to keep them on the back wall and some old military leather to hang everything from the hood poles and voila ! ;)

I don’t know if it ever happened, but it’s very practical and looking old enough not to swear in the Bolide’s cabin!

Well, I promise, I'll stop decorating ! :ph34r:

610B669D-48E5-4344-9DF9-F9E83478AD6B.jpeg

 

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In 4VC, the panel which closes the rear of the cockpit, called (I think) the Rear Squab Assembly), has been fitted with a number of toggles.  These toggles turn through 90 degrees to lock into position, and allowed a net to be fixed in position, and inside could be placed maps and other paraphernalia.  This arrangement was confirmed to me by Graham Robson and Willy Cave.

In 1969, when I bought the car, there was no net, but I have used the toggles to mount a simple net, and it's very useful.

Ian Cornish

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1 hour ago, ianc said:

In 4VC, the panel which closes the rear of the cockpit, called (I think) the Rear Squab Assembly), has been fitted with a number of toggles.  These toggles turn through 90 degrees to lock into position, and allowed a net to be fixed in position, and inside could be placed maps and other paraphernalia.  This arrangement was confirmed to me by Graham Robson and Willy Cave.

In 1969, when I bought the car, there was no net, but I have used the toggles to mount a simple net, and it's very useful.

Ian Cornish

Would you post a photo, please ? ;)

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There are 3 of these toggles across the top of the squab, and one at each side at the bottom.  I feel sure that the same arrangement would be seen in the other Works' TR4 Rally cars: 3VC, 5VC and 6VC.

To support my rather crude net arrangement, I used a slim strip of timber across the top, and a timber rod across the bottom, then slid strong cable ties down the right and left sides.

I have had a look at various sites, but have been unable to find any of these toggle fasteners - I am hoping that Peter Wigglesworth might read this and have some idea as to sources.

Ian Cornish

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1 hour ago, ianc said:

 

I have had a look at various sites, but have been unable to find any of these toggle fasteners - I am hoping that Peter Wigglesworth might read this and have some idea as to sources.

Ian Cornish

 

 

  I had to look up the generic name but there are sites selling various types and sizes

https://www.attwoollsmanufacturing.co.uk/turn-buttons/

Who may be able to find exact copies ?

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I used to have a chromed version of those toggles to hold my tonneau on at the dash end. (Only fitted as the s/hand tonneau came with the corresponding fasteners already fitted) . https://www.woolies-trim.co.uk/category/60/turnbuckles

Hamish beat me to it!

Stuart.

 

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Edited by stuart
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The problem when searching is finding a name which will uncover the little beasties!  Well done Hamish and Stuart!

During lunch, Maddy suggested that I try "twist lock fastener", and I have found a number of suppliers:

- seascrew.com have DOT Turn Button fasteners

- jetpress.com/component-and-fastener-products/fasteners-and-components/fabric-fasteners-clothing-military-and-marine/dot-fasteners

- ebay seller 191720025225 has fasteners which have a pair of pointed legs which could be pressed through the squab and secured to the mating metal plate

- Amazon (I hate to mention this company!) have common-sense-button-fasteners-dodger in 2 sizes (one currently unavailable)

I can't say how these catches are fixed to 4VC's squab, and I have no intention of removing it to find out!   However, I think it likely that they are secured as I have described for the ebay offering.

Ian Cornish

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I go to the National Theatre for the afternoon and come home to find my parts knowledge has been usurped.   The same twist/toggle type fasteners are fitted to Austin Sprites.

item 5 here. https://www.moss-europe.co.uk/shop-by-model/austin-healey/sprite/weather-equipment/hoods-hood-frames-fittings/hood-frame-fittings-sprite-i-ii-midget-i-1958-64.html

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Teher,

Love your TR2, just the perfect look.

My 1961 TR3A was originally sold in France! ...Date of Dispatch from the factory 7/12/1961. The build sheet from the British Motor Ind. Heritage Trust states the car

was shipped too: Cie du Garages Monceau, Paris, France.

The car was eventually shipped to Seattle, WA, USA. I purchased it from the original owner's Son. It now resides in Connecticut, USA. I did a body off restoration, originally Powder Blue, I finished it in Cotswold Blue.

My question is, are you familiar with the Cie du Garages Monceau, Paris, France?

I am trying to find information/photos about that dealer. Probably not around anymore, but would be fun to have information about how the car got here.

Thanks,

Colin

IMG_1881 copy 3.jpg

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The Garages du Monceau was the Triumph dealer certainly for the Paris area and probably for a large part of France. They shut down or lost the Triumph franchise, I think, in the mid seventies.

When I was still living in UK. I recall discussing with Pete Buckles of Cox and Buckles (aka Moss now) how to mount an expedition to get hold of the TR spares remaining. I don’t think it came to anything.

Long time French TR owners may come on to tell you more

james

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La Cie du Garage Monceau was the official French retailer of Triumph. If my information is correct, they were created in 1956 and remained Triumph dealers until the 70s…

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And with our greatest French singer ! :D

516BAA3F-6797-49BF-A3F9-F5994E6779F2.jpeg

Edited by Teher
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  • 1 month later...
On 12/26/2021 at 5:42 PM, BlueTR3A-5EKT said:

Would you consider it to be warmer/more effective than the standard Smiths unit Stuart?  

I expect to sit the thing on two cross bars placed on the dash support rails.   Sat on the flat plate.   Being certain the water connect tubes are uppermost to prevent air locks.

The standard rheostat switch seems to work as a switch but does not really slow the fan speed.  I would need guidance on that.    I had wondered about this PWN Unit.        https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/224723660731?_trkparms=amclksrc%3DITM%26aid%3D1110006%26algo%3DHOMESPLICE.SIM%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D235872%26meid%3D9ff5de94ab66423eae5cb04dc80471ee%26pid%3D101195%26rk%3D6%26rkt%3D12%26sd%3D393385175137%26itm%3D224723660731%26pmt%3D1%26noa%3D0%26pg%3D2047675%26algv%3DSimplAMLv9PairwiseWebMskuAspectsV202110NoVariantSeedWithPLXV2Ranker%26brand%3DUnbranded&_trksid=p2047675.c101195.m1851&amdata=cksum%3A2247236607319ff5de94ab66423eae5cb04dc80471ee|enc%3AAQAGAAACIBCyHc0SSi7uHsubVzaE22UaVpY2q0%2BCM9t3AI5lqyGWyZUyIg%2Blmp%2FIIem0AKpiWVsMrY5o2Dpu7DY7Eptk4Tww61k0oLjduTBM5f1%2B7gbaxbwJIV9g90Uqw49AckKks66Y5SNgwXv9J5kFPyJ5LGiTsDt2KIlOOYSIxMoTxx5gycyzKL%2BHzlCT5KnBjDHOVzNH%2BOzDYR5JPXPhIQnbjAD855Jz9wn36y91lcMdo9ptTEhiuuR%2B32U2clVbfgTtUU5e7nbSZwm%2FUC5OSMIZDXHUkpDDJovWBCwWvXoLtIlIsXD21b5FlwMTrNKrOOCxNzty3NLU%2BoREzL%2F5LlkZ3%2BDlgUSIJM72yxmNwEcWrr3HM0QDEVTxJmiXO9%2Bcucb8SdUdXPzoWUpsKn32qDETEbAn%2BFFhgrcOqOOc9glktjSQwKDYizqtHidG%2FHh%2F%2FbvrVtjpM0Q2QBdaMIDCm6cePQQYs7Z7%2BOPjniEBV1npXFxIbCDV5MPYEsvbIxAYOO3u9svvwmANWEM3dJsn3DAZk5qxWNgvaBdio%2FeNG0m1VAPv7I41fWW%2Bj0wXwTxKOtr7uSfiCSsqSMA4r4CS9PXweUyk0XkclG9dFoax9zVMpgRGVq3qKN7o5Tz3tbhkbYTgAede7FJOEfWBr4mI13yeuwAJspx%2BbF4EZ51bDzyda52jhu00aEi5AEzlzlAduGwgh%2FgAHbS0HKKCYDlRqOTd7qY%3D|ampid%3APL_CLK|clp%3A2047675
Or this. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/393385175137

 


 

Hi Peter having just completed a Rally thru France , I can report the T7 heater with the standard rheostat control set to the lowest speed was still too effective! We had to go with the on off routine even in the colder mountain ranges of the Hautes-Alps.

Any suggestions on how we can slow the fan even more would be useful from our electronics gurus :-)

Iain

HT and sidescreens on. 

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The easy- but-crude method is to switch an extra resistor in series with the motor.   It would be a big wire-wound one, would get rather hot and would give only one slower speed setting.  Experimentation would be necessary to determine a suitable resistance value. 

The better method would be to use something like this to replace the rheostat, which will give complete continuously-variable control of the motor speed.  This one doesn't switch off completely, so an on/off switch would also be needed.  Smaller ones are available if the fan current is lower - I don't know what the T7 takes.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/ARCELI-Controller-Radiation-Frequency-Efficiency/dp/B07RG9P29L/ref=sr_1_6?crid=32DDVBL18DHXF&keywords=dc+motor+speed+controller+12v&qid=1647509050&sprefix=DC+motor+sp%2Caps%2C160&sr=8-6

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by RobH
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FWIW I have fitted a FX4 taxi heater control valve in the feed pipe from the head to give inside control of the heat which also might help. Fitted this to Martin Jays car with a pull control under the dash, works well.

Stuart.

 

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photo1359 - Copy.jpg

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54 minutes ago, iain said:

Hi Peter having just completed a Rally thru France , I can report the T7 heater with the standard rheostat control set to the lowest speed was still too effective! We had to go with the on off routine even in the colder mountain ranges of the Hautes-Alps.

Any suggestions on how we can slow the fan even more would be useful from our electronics gurus :-)

Iain

HT and sidescreens on. 

What rallye was that Iain ? Any pictures and a report ?

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7 hours ago, iain said:

Hi Peter having just completed a Rally thru France , I can report the T7 heater with the standard rheostat control set to the lowest speed was still too effective! We had to go with the on off routine even in the colder mountain ranges of the Hautes-Alps.

Any suggestions on how we can slow the fan even more would be useful from our electronics gurus :-)

Iain

HT and sidescreens on. 

I too have this issue to contend with.  I looked at T7 

https://www.t7design.co.uk/pwm-power-fan-control-12-24v-dc-10a-d84-49e-7d4.html

The PWM that Rob links to is attractive for its cheapness, I found the identical on eBay.

The addition of a water flow valve is good but I think a bypass type might be more suitable to keep the water flow round the engine. 
https://www.t7design.co.uk/tx2-heater-bypass-valve-16mm-5-8-push-to-bypass-52f-4e3-58f.html

 

Cheers

Peter W

Edited by BlueTR3A-5EKT
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1 hour ago, BlueTR3A-5EKT said:

 

The addition of a water flow valve is good but I think a bypass type might be more suitable to keep the water flow round the engine.  https://www.t7design.co.uk/tx2-heater-bypass-valve-16mm-5-8-push-to-bypass-52f-4e3-58f.html

Cheers

Peter W

TBH that would make for some complicated plumbing and I dont really see that it would make any difference to the flow round the engine.

Stuart.

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Thanks Peter and Rob, I will investigate further and report back.

One thing I didn't try was closing the heater valve down.......doh!

Stuart agree with you on the valve.

Iain

Edited by iain
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I fitted a PWM unit to my standard heater fan circuit. It allow speed control from zero to full.

Bob

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