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My son had a door fitted by a local tradesman. It is four panel timber internal door. It has split at one end allowing the side timber to move about 1" away from the rest of the frame at one end only.  I have some frame cramps and will try and glue it back in place.  I need a really strong glue that will withstand temperature changes because the room is over the garage and not used much in winter. I think regular evo-stick will not be enough. What is Gorilla glue. ?  I can leave it clamped up for three days. The fitter claims that it is due to lack of heating in the winter. We think that it is a cheap door and no good.

Thanks for any advice.

Richard & B

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The strongest and most weatherproof woodworking adhesive I have used is Cascamite.  Much stronger than PVA. 

Edited by RobH
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the white PVA type wood glue should do it.

as will an epoxy.

i have only used gorilla glue once and it did work but also bubbled up/expanded - i think moisture activated ?

clamping is essential whichever is used.

if its not an aesthetic door try belt and braces with a screw to lock it all together well countersunk and you can cover ( filler or a wooded plug) the screw

 

H

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If the two faces of the wood are flush then PVA is strong if it leaks out a damp cloth cleans it up well before setting.

 Gorilla glue is a strong, moisture activated, (dampen the surfaces first) expanding glue and is wonderful stuff if the surfaces have great voids in them or are a loose fit as it expands and makes a really secure joint however it will always bubble out onto the surface and it is a pain to trim off and sand back, (wonderful for gluing shoe soles back on!) Also good outdoors in a damp environment, it will glue wood to stone or whatever you fancy.

Your task sounds like a job for PVA.

Alan

Edited by barkerwilliams
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+1 for Cascamite. If you use Gorilla glue I would recommend the clear version, which doesn't foam but seems to make a stronger bond with wood.

Pete

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I had a case of that on a old solid pine door, I stuck it with a two part clue. It worked but was visible. Eventually I replaced the panel stained and waxed you can’t tell the difference. Costs relatively cheap plus permanent job, just a little time consuming.

Edited by Misfit
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Waterproof PVA with clamps is ideal for flush fitting surfaces whilst cascamite is gap filling and also excellent. Never liked the moisture activated ones as can sometimes push joints apart and can look untidy.

Tim

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I used Evostik Resin W for my latest project and have always done so since O level woodwork.

Cheers Richard

DSCN2522 (1).JPG

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Just how old is Cascamite .

I used it at school in the early 60's and I suspect it had been around for 100 years before that.  Excellent stuff.  But the OVA also works very well

 

Roger

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27 minutes ago, Paulsb said:

definitly cascamite

Never heard of it till now. !!

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3 hours ago, stillp said:

Ah yes, the Agatha Christie method, never fails.

Pete

I changed it from two pack to two part I didn’t use a trade name as there are many to choose from. I could have suggested  Araldite Rapid Syringe Epoxy, 24 ml, ARA-400007

Temperature tolerance-30 to 80 degrees chemical, water, and oil resistant, which would apparently suit the conditions you referred to for the roof space, as mentioned in your initial post Richard and easy to use. An alternative would be replace the panel as I did if you can’t get a satisfactory joint assuming it’s possible. 
Just a suggestion. However I guess Cascamite would work as suggested by many others, although I haven’t used it.

I hope this helps

From missunderstood :(

Derek

Edited by Misfit
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We used this stuff at school in woodwork

Aerolite 306 2 part resin.

Works on aeroplanes OK

https://www.adkwik.co.uk/aerolite-306-adhesive-kit/

https://www.lasaero.com/products/article/F02IBYVV9

Spec pdf.  https://www.tridentuk.com/gb/amfile/file/download/file/4/product/3124/

 

This much valued urea-formaldehyde/acid hardener glue has been used for many years in boat building and light aircraft wood applications for its strength and dependability of bond. The powder resin is mixed with warm water into a thin brushable cream and the hardener is applied to the mating surface. The two parts are then clamped in close contact for the set to be completed. Working or open time depends on the ambient temperature and humidity but will be in the region of 5-25 minutes. Similarly the clamping time will be influenced by these factors but will need to be left for 1.1/2-3.1/2 hours. However, full strength may take up to 14 days to acquire.

• Type - Urea-formaldehyde
• Suitable for Wood
• Interior/Exterior use
• Setting time 25 mins/3 hours dependent on temperature

Edited by BlueTR3A-5EKT
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