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I'm getting good value from this forum and helpful members, thanks to all.

I have ordered a new hood and tonneau. Recently I read a post discussing the merits of tenex and lift-the-dot fasteners.

on the doors for a better fit of the side screens. 

I guess at this stage I can specify the type of fastener for the door-tonneau that is best for all round use. Appreciate advice on the best option.

John

 

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Hi John, 

   Interesting. I've got lift the dot and doesn't cause me an issue, but now you have written this I can see the merits of tenax in this position. 

    One thing the remember is to fit the hood and cover for periods to stop them shrinking. They can be a pig to fit if they have not been on for a while. I'm sure a little heat would help but I've always just about managed. 

Neil

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8 hours ago, John Reilly said:

I have ordered Mohair. I had a TR6 some years ago with a Mohair hood and it worked well.

Good choice. (IMHO). 

Rgds Ian

PS. I have ltd fasteners everywhere apart from the Tenax fasteners across the top of the screen and that arrangement works well for me. 

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I owned a couple of TR2s as daily drivers for a total of 6 years in the 1960s. 

Tenax fasteners are clever, but are too easily damaged if mishandled by someone who doesn't appreciate how they work - ramming onto the peg can bend or break one of the claws which should grip the peg.

Ian Cornish

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4 minutes ago, ianc said:

I owned a couple of TR2s as daily drivers for a total of 6 years in the 1960s. 

Tenax fasteners are clever, but are too easily damaged if mishandled by someone who doesn't appreciate how they work - ramming onto the peg can bend or break one of the claws which should grip the peg.

Ian Cornish

Which is why they were changed early on in TR2 production where they were in use all round..

Stuart.

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12 hours ago, John Reilly said:

Recently I read a post discussing the merits of tenex and lift-the-dot fasteners.

on the doors for a better fit of the side screens. 

I guess at this stage I can specify the type of fastener for the door-tonneau that is best for all round use. Appreciate advice on the best option.

John

 

Only problem with LTD on the doors is if you have the TR3A type sidescreens with the fixed lower panel, mixed with an earlier door. The problem being that the earlier cars had sidescreens which use those door fasteners to hold down the bottom panel (which hinges) so the LTD pegs pass through the panel.

Later sidescreens do not use the pegs, so have no holes for them. In this case the pegs are fitted lower down on the door.

If you have an early door, but late sidescreens then the lower panel sits on top of the pegs, & so does not really fit. 

Solutions are:   Fit the LTD pegs lower on the door, or use lower profile pegs.

I am in that situation, & I have fitted "Press stud" type fastenings on my door, & tonneau, as these are much lower profile & do not get in the way of the sidescreen.   I did have to move one LTD peg each side on the body just behind the door.

Bob.

Edited by Lebro
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My long door TR2 has tenax all round, my short door car has ltd except on the top of the windscreen (where all sidescreens have tenax).

Ltd around the cockpit is far more practical in my experience.

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11 hours ago, John Reilly said:

I have ordered Mohair. I had a TR6 some years ago with a Mohair hood and it worked well.

Ask for a few extra yards of the fabric so you can get your sidescreens covered in matching material.  Unless the hood maker is doing sidescreens too at the same time   What about the tonneau and hood stick cover?  Any choice made on those?

Peter W

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Peter,

Good idea about the extra fabric for the side screens, how much will be needed do you think?

Also do you know a trimmer who does good work on fitting the fabric to the screens? It looks a tricky job?

I have ordered the covers and trim from John Skinner, he does not do widescreen recovering.

I am still a bit confused over the best fasteners. I think I have the original doors and there are holes where the fasteners were previously fitted. I have grotty screens, with the wedges, not Dzus. One has remnants of fabric and it has a flap.

Does the tonneau come with fasteners punched and fitted? or is that a fettling job?

To answer your question, I have ordered the Hood and Tonneau in Mohair (Black) but I have ordered the stick cover in the same fabric as the interior  trim. Again are the fasteners already fitted as per a template or is it a local fettling job.

Forgive these questions but I am a sidescreen virgin!

John

 

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John, I think all hood makers etc supply the hood, tonneau whatever without the fasteners fitted as there are too many variations around. You will have to get yourself a ltd tool to punch the holes. If your hood maker does not syupply the fasteners you will have to buy those as well. There is a good section in Roger Williams book "How to restore TR2/3/3a" that explains the sequence and method you should adopt to get them in the right places.

Ralph.

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john,

having spent the premium for a mohair hood which is not standard hood I suggest that the fitting is a job for a pro. There is nothing worse than a badly fitting hood and side screens. Unless you are a confident diyer with some upholstlery skills it takes a lot of time and commitment to make the holes in the new hood and you can not unmake them. I measured and planned the first holes over three days. You need to get the hood sticks right or it sits like Nora Batty's stockings. IT WILL ALWAYS HAUNT YOU IF IT'S WRONG AND YOU KNOW IT!

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Rod,

Yes I know that haunting feeling!

The Mohair hood I had on the TR6 used press-studs and they looked and worked well, it had a onneau which I used only once and it was a bitch to fit, very tight so probably as Neil said above, lack of regular use.

I live on the South Coast of Ireland, Co Cork. There are not many "pro's" around here that I know of so I will have to be careful and brave! 

There is a sailmaker local, perhaps expertise can be found there?

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Hi John,

The sailmaker sounds ideal if nothing else for advice. Ask if he makes yacht spray covers. I found a really good one just north of Belfast to make a hood cover for my Quicksilver 620. The material used was very similar to mohair but stiffer.

Find a Marina supplies company as there are some serious yachtsman down there and there will be a quality service some where there.

I fitted this myself but it took real courage and many days inside and out with heat and copious measurements, clamps, three hands and everything I had. It ain't right  but I'm happy with it.

Rod

PICT1796.JPG

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It looks pretty good to me Rod. When I had my hood fitted I gave the guy doing it a couple of pictures of your hood (lifted from this forum), as an example of how it should look. He didn’t get it as taut as you have but it is totally leakproof. 

Rgds Ian

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Hi John,

they are Harley Davidson motorcycle ones. Not brilliant but work OK and look period.

Not happy with screen top but due to the foam u seal under the top with fasteners. 

Rod.

right side.JPG

P5300096.JPG

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