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As my car is nearly finished I have turned my attention to smaller details, one of which is the lack of the correct jack. Not having had any experience with them, is it best to buy an original jack, or just a simple scissor type.

Input appreciated.

Ralph

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A low entry trolley jack is very useful for garage jobs , i went with the machinemart one for about £100 and it’s served well for a decade now.

in the car i went for a simple scissor jack that fits in the wheel well

Edited by Steves_TR6
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I have a scissor jack too for  the car wheel well. 

Edited by Hamish
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A decent scissor jack is useful. With a (old wheel?) nut welded to it to replace the hassle of the usual crank arrangement. If you’re feeling flush I believe there are electric versions.
 

james

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Because of the low chassis your scissor jack will be virtually flat when you first start to lift so it will be difficult to operate, so an electric on is a good idea. How do I know? Because mine isn’t electric and I sometimes wish it was. 

Rgds Ian

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23 minutes ago, Ian Vincent said:

Because of the low chassis your scissor jack will be virtually flat when you first start to lift so it will be difficult to operate, so an electric on is a good idea. How do I know? Because mine isn’t electric and I sometimes wish it was. 

Rgds Ian

Good point about the low chassis. I looked at the electric items but the motor on the side makes them quite bulky and it would have to live in the boot, where space is already limited with hood, sidescreens etc.

What are the standard ones like to use, or are they a pain by the time you have removed mats, carpets, underlay, rubber bungs etc.

Ralph

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I can't answer about the standard type as I only have a 2T scissor jack which lives alongside the spare wheel, and which is a bit of a bugger to operate at its lowest level until it is open enough to provide some decent leverage.

Rgds Ian

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If you go for an original type of jack do not get an after market job, they are made of cheese. I had one and the lug that engages in the chassis distorted and the car fell, fortunately it happened as I was jacking the car up and not as I was removing a wheel

George 

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After a lot of searching (they are hard to come by), I was able to purchase an original Jack which I re-painted in it's original colours of red with a black base, I also have the correct ratchet to go with it. It's not the fastest way to lift a car, but it's secure. I also have a complete toolkit incl. wheel brace & starting handle as supplied by Triumph. It's nice to have and use the original tools for the car.

Rob

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I carry the original jack but can't remember the last time I used it. Hopefully I'll remember how it goes if I should need it. Virtually all the jacking I do is in or near my garage where I use a low profile floor jack.

Tom

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Folks pay fairly serious money for an original jack,(they are rare as most have been bent in honest use) as in jacking from the inside out of the rain. I had one with my TR2 some 50 years ago and it frightened the sh**s out of me on a remote road in Aberdeenshire. Never again. Even as an impecunious student I decided that a screw jack was worth it. 
No the original jacks look good, but don’t use one!!

james

Edited by james christie
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I have had good experience with my original jack, works very well and is stable even on rough surfaces as I found out following a puncture on a Norwegian dirt road.

I hate scissor jacks as, at the age of 16, I had a front corner of an A35 fall on my hand when the scissor jack failed. It was the first and only time I swore at my dad "get this XXXXXXX car of my hand" I asked politely. He did so by picking up said corner by the bumper - the power of adrenalin.

Stick to a genuine original one or a good screw jack.

Mick

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I know this may sound obvious to the members on here but remember you need a jack that can fit when you have a flat tyre (that's the main reason you will be using outside of your garage). These cars are low, and with a flat tyre they are really low. I use (or have) a scissor Jack in the tyre compartment for this reason. I'm not convinced the electric ones would go low enough but have not checked. 

     In the garage a low entry trolley jack from SGS engineering covers the job. Although I've just treated myself to a car scissor lift which is saving my back from getting up and down. 50th present in lock down 

Neil

 

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As James says, the original Triumph jack is something not to be used.  One is relying on anchorage into the chassis (how good is that after 50 years?) and one is lifting half the car (that's half a ton) when usually one needs only to lift a corner.

I used the original jack once on my TR2 in the early 1960s - never again!

If you can find a very dumpy hydraulic bottle jack, that is ideal - have a look on eBay.  I bought one over 50 years ago, very squat and it still works well.

Most modern bottle jacks are too tall, you need an old-fashioned one - they do appear occasionally on eBay.

Ian Cornish

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23 minutes ago, NCS_TR3A said:

I use (or have) a scissor Jack in the tyre compartment for this reason. I'm not convinced the electric ones would go low enough but have not checked. 

Yes they do. I had a rear-tyre puncture the year before last and the jack did go low enough. I'm not sure about a front puncture though. You would have to jack somewhere rear of the wheel I think, particularly if you have a front roll-bar. 

Edited by RobH
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45 minutes ago, NCS_TR3A said:

I know this may sound obvious to the members on here but remember you need a jack that can fit when you have a flat tyre (that's the main reason you will be using outside of your garage). These cars are low, and with a flat tyre they are really low. I use (or have) a scissor Jack in the tyre compartment for this reason. I'm not convinced the electric ones would go low enough but have not checked. 

     In the garage a low entry trolley jack from SGS engineering covers the job. Although I've just treated myself to a car scissor lift which is saving my back from getting up and down. 50th present in lock down 

Neil

 

Come come lads...a little parrellel thought process gets past many obstacles. Puncture on the front ? drive the car up the kerb on the punctured side it is...another "4 of clearance gained. No handy kerb ? check for small boulder in the soft verge you can use under the punctured wheel or a thickish tree branch, or the missus's cherry cake (ducks), or dig out a small area on the soft verge and place the electric scissor in it with a magazine under it (they are on a widish foot anyway).

561750021_Electricscissor.thumb.jpg.4cfc4debf43d2ffd00ad0aed204521fc.jpg

There's many ways to gain height, but you don't need it with an electric jack using 165 tyres, it will go under neath the TR chassis height.

Mick Richards

Edited by Motorsport Mickey
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1 hour ago, RobH said:

Yes they do. I had a rear-tyre puncture the year before last and the jack did go low enough. I'm not sure about a front puncture though. You would have to jack somewhere rear of the wheel I think, particularly if you have a front roll-bar. 

Thanks Rob. I might well consider this myself then. 

Neil

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49 minutes ago, Motorsport Mickey said:

Come come lads...a little parrellel thought process gets past many obstacles. Puncture on the front ? drive the car up the kerb on the punctured side it is...another "4 of clearance gained. No handy kerb ? check for small boulder in the soft verge you can use under the punctured wheel or a thickish tree branch, or the missus's cherry cake (ducks), or dig out a small area on the soft verge and place the electric scissor in it with a magazine under it (they are on a widish foot anyway).

561750021_Electricscissor.thumb.jpg.4cfc4debf43d2ffd00ad0aed204521fc.jpg

There's many ways to gain height, but you don't need it with an electric jack using 165 tyres, it will go under neath the TR chassis height.

Mick Richards

Mick, understand we're you are coming from, and have had a fair few get me home episodes in my life but only one I the TR which was a wiring issue. Whilst there is always a solution to be found on the hop the more prepared you are the easier it is. But get the message. Thanks for the photo of the electric jack, doe look like it goes low and given Robs confirmation it does sound like a good solution if you have the space in the wheel compartment, or boot. 

Neil

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While routing in the garage to take pictures of the breather hole in my old block for Brian Eldred, I came upon this. Bought some years ago for my daughters Vauxhall Adam that had no spare wheel or tools. Never been used and fitted inside the 15 inch space saver spare. Might do the job for me. Won`t need the towing eye or wheel brace but that leaves room for other things. Only possible problem I can see is that it has a fairly short handle so the jack will have to be near to the outside of the car.

Ralph

20210202_092522.jpg

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I have a scissor jack stowed inside the spare wheel, along with it's foldable lever, & wheel brace. The wheel is protected by have a sheet of cardboard between it & the jack etc.  Having said that I have not yet had to use it in anger, but I'm sure I could manage.

Bob.

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Well, I'm with MM on this one.

having had a rear off side puncture on my 4A on a dark wet night on a busy road I had to use a basic scissor jack and it was hell.

Through this forum I found out about electric scissor jacks and haven't looked back. I also haven't had a puncture.

But!!! I did help a woman who had a puncture in her Toyota and she was impressed  with how mine worked.

They are also Ideal for helping to get the Gearbox in and out.

Mine is stored in the boot lefthand side and is out of the way.

Roger

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21 hours ago, james christie said:

A decent scissor jack is useful. With a (old wheel?) nut welded to it to replace the hassle of the usual crank arrangement. If you’re feeling flush I believe there are electric versions.
 

james

Like this, and also a good idea to enhance the saddle to locate well on the TR Chassis.

John.

215961593_trjack3.JPG.510fb302ea9e34e6dbacd55703c78507.JPG1600574346_trjack(2).JPG.ecf1c98a4e17c3219f4747ab1ef26bbd.JPG

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Unfortunately the polystyrene carrier would not fit inside the wheel, but the jack is of good quality, marked up GM/Saab, and fits inside the wheel as shown with the handle and the hide hammer. I may add to the platform as Ian has done so it spans the chassis and also spreads the load.

Ralph

20210202_121835.jpg

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