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Hi all,

I'm  well aware of the myriad of threads we have on this subject, indeed I switched many years ago, after reading Ians detailed info on technicalities.

My question is simple, does anyone do an, 'Off the Shelf, conversion kit?'

I do know Moss for example offer conversion kit bracketry, but I can't see afull 'Everything?'

John.

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I think you will find that most of your favourite suppliers will supply all the bits and pieces including the alternator. They may or may not include fitting instructions - in which case the various technical articles can be consulted

james

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3 hours ago, Ian Vincent said:

What you need is a kit and a set of detailed instructions appropriate to that kit so that it can be fitted by a ‘numpty’. 

Rgds Ian

Are you implying that our esteemed moderator and forum champion is a numpty??? :P

Pete

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Not in the least but maybe he is asking on behalf of others.

I know from my experience with the Kubota Denso alternator that I had bought, I needed some help (from Phil Tucker) on how to sort out the wiring.  Ianc’s excellent notes didn’t cover that type and being a bit of a numpty myself, the last thing I wanted to do was blow it up. 

Rgds Ian

Edited by Ian Vincent
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In March 2011, TR Action 248 (can be viewed on-line on the TRR site), James Christie and I produced an article about the Moss alternator kit and the struggle James had endured trying to get it installed and working.  A large number of emails went back and form between James (in France) and me!  Whether Moss has improved its instructions since then, I have no idea - but our article should assist with both mechanical and electrical details if taking that route.

Worthwhile talking to Neil Revington as he seems to produce helpful and detailed instructions with his offerings.

Ian Cornish

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3 hours ago, stillp said:

Are you implying that our esteemed moderator and forum champion is a numpty??? :P

Pete

Thanks Guys,

Pete, PM me your address, cause you are going on my Christmas Card List!

Question, wasn't for me, but a fellow group member, who just this year bought his Tr4A, and is looking at a winter projest or two.

As I said, Moss do a fitting kit, but I just wondered if anybody does the lot in a box, Thats Alternator, fitting kit maybe even a dummy regulator  so the job looks the same etc.

Think the answer is no, but thought I would ask anyway.

John.

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4 minutes ago, John Morrison said:

Thats Alternator, fitting kit maybe even a dummy regulator

What about the narrow belt conversion John - or are you suggesting he re-uses the wide dynamo pulley (which works but is not ideal for an alternator) ?    I'm not aware of any suppliers of wide pulleys for alternators and turned-up my own.  

Edited by RobH
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John

honestly if I can do it ANYONE can. 
the info is here. 
H

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Final Question on this, if fitting the two terminal alternator and using the control box, now as a dummy connecting block, can anyone confirm which terminals are linked for the new system.

 

I have looked at the technicalities diagram, and am just struggling a bit to be 100% confident.

 

Cheers,

John.

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8 minutes ago, John Morrison said:

Final Question on this, if fitting the two terminal alternator and using the control box, now as a dummy connecting block, can anyone confirm which terminals are linked for the new system.

 

I have looked at the technicalities diagram, and am just struggling a bit to be 100% confident.

 

Cheers,

John.

What was it I wrote about detailed instructions. :)

Rgds Ian

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This outfit sell a "complete" kit, and their site also has an instructional video: http://www.triumphrescue.com/index.php/stuff-for-sale/online-store.html#!/TR3-&-TR4-Alternator-Kits/p/28226336/category=6664605

I did not use them so I cannot comment on how complete their kit may actually be.

I did a small belt conversion using a GM Delco unit, and made the mounts from scratch, using the original adjusting arm.  The Racetorations setup looks quite nice and would have save a lot of bother. May only work with their proprietary alternator however. They say their unit is a single wire setup which may mean the ignition lamp will not function. On many GM single wire alternators it is possible to remove a plug and fit a three wire "pig tail", which is what I did. Hated not having the ignition lamp, especially after I left the key on overnight and killed both the battery and the coil.

Andy

Edited by Andy303
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I’ve removed the internals from the control box and linked across the required terminals under the base. The empty box makes a great storage for spare bulbs, fuses and a relay all protected with bubble wrap. 

Edited by Drewmotty
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Since the answer was via PM, for completeness and the benefit of anyone searching this topic in the future one possible way of doing it is this. The wiring arrangement shown is for standard TR2-4A. Bear in mind that the car may have had extra connections added over the years or the wiring colours may not be exactly as shown here.

I seem to recall that with judicious cutting and bending and a little soldering it is possible to re-arrange the existing control-box internal links into the new arrangement, rather than to replace them completely.

 

Untitled.thumb.jpg.7ae24924cabcb56a7037b4f0d1616646.jpg

 

 

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Nice diagram, Rob - should be a great help to those who turn green when thinking about electrickery!

I've pasted it into a Word document and saved it under "Alternators", along with all my other Technical articles.

Ian Cornish

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Thanks Rob.

You see it doesn't do to be complacent, certainly not with electrics.

In your diagram E does nothing, I had it that E anf F are linked?

Or does it matter?

John.

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No it doesn't really matter John, as I said that is is one way of doing it and there are several others.  There is no need for an earth any more so another option is instead of putting the two yellow wires on the same F terminal to make the connection as I have shown,  you could link F to E  in the control box and put one yellow wire on each if you wanted.  

As long as those two wires are connected together - and not to anything else.

Leaving the E  terminal free does give you somewhere to park the old earth wire. It doesn't do anything any more but it saves cutting it off or tucking it back in the loom. 

Edited by RobH
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1 hour ago, RobH said:

Since the answer was via PM, for completeness and the benefit of anyone searching this topic in the future one possible way of doing it is this. The wiring arrangement shown is for standard TR2-4A. Bear in mind that the car may have had extra connections added over the years or the wiring colours may not be exactly as shown here.

I seem to recall that with judicious cutting and bending and a little soldering it is possible to re-arrange the existing control-box internal links into the new arrangement, rather than to replace them completely.

 

Untitled.thumb.jpg.7ae24924cabcb56a7037b4f0d1616646.jpg

 

Now those are what I call detailed instructions.  Well done Rob.

Rgds Ian

Edited by Ian Vincent
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If you don't want to castrate your Control Box, you can do what I did some 30 years ago (I have updated the cost from £4!), then flog the Box - original Control Boxes are sought after because they work properly:

The TR4 has push-on (Lucar) connectors, so I have used a neat, 4-way, Lucas connector block for the three large connectors - it was fitted to the earlier TR6 models (Triumph Part Number 150640; the white block next to the Hazard Relay in Figure 38 on page 6.140 and Figure 5 on page 6.110 of the TR6 Workshop Manual Supplement) and is available from Revington for about £14 (slightly more form Moss!). To link the connections to the Ignition Warning Light, I used one of the neat, modern, blade fuse holders, which take the smaller push-on connectors. A 3 amp fuse is more than adequate for this duty (in reality, no fuse is required, but something is required to make the connection). The Lucas connector block can be screwed or riveted down; the fuse holder can be stuck down, using glue or the thicker type of double-sided adhesive tape.

Ian Cornish

Connector blocks 4VC.jpg

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1 hour ago, ianc said:

original Control Boxes are sought after because they work properly:

Agreed - when I did this some years ago I used a duff modern control-box and kept the original Lucas one.

The empty box makes a good place to hide a four-way auxiliary fuse block.

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