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Just got car back on the road after almost 12 months, winter and lockdown. The indicators have always been a problem but I have generally been on the ball to cancel after use until now when I am forgetting to do so but having reminders from following traffic. Occasionally they will cancel from a right turn but never from a left. Do I need to replace the switch or the ring thing on the column or should I fit a audible repeater. Anyone else had this problem?

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Had this problem on my car and had to fix other cars as well. Jack up front of car so front wheels off the ground to make it easier to turn the steering wheel. Remove the plastic cowls covering the switch housing by undoing two screws above and below them. You should then be able to see the ring with the blip on it attached to the column that cancels the switch. The 'blip' should be on same side of column as switch. (I fixed one friends car where it was on the opposite side - it can be turned in situ using screwdrivers but disconnect battery if you need to do this.) Operate the indicator, rotate the steering wheel and watch to see what happens. There are 2 cancelling 'levers', one for left one for right. I am guessing that the left cancelling lever is too far from the cancelling blip on the ring. Loosen screws holding switch and see if you can adjust it closer until it cancels correctly. You need to turn the steering wheel enough and then back enough for this to happen. From what you say it sounds that the switch might be ok but just not quite in correct position. I seem to remember that I might have had to file a fixing hole to move my switch enough.

Just to clarify - you only need to move the activating ring if the blip it is pointing to the opposite side to the switch. The ring locates in notches on the column so can only point left or right. The two posts below explain how to line the blip up so that it is central between the two levers on the switch. You still have to ensure the levers of the switch are close enough to the activating ring blip. Can be a long fiddly job as you will see from Tr4aJim below but you should only need to do it once.

Good luck

Keith

Edited by keith1948
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Not sure, but I seem to remember that the clip has an indent that keeps it to a fixed position on the column, so to position it correctly for the turn signal cancellation you have position the wheels at the straight ahead point, then separate the upper and lower columns and rotate the splines to give the correct orientation of the clip, after that, as Keith has said, check that both levers are being actuated by the clip.

Cheers Rob

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I just fixed a similar issue on my car. Left turns cancelled but right turns didn’t. I checked and the directional signal canceling cam was offset when the wheel was straight. So I guess it never had enough travel to cancel on right turns while driving. Here’s what I did to fix it:

- set the front wheels straight ahead. 
- remove the directional signal escutcheon so the directional signal cam and directional signal trigger lobes are visible. 
- loosen the upper steering column clamp (#5-10) so the upper outer column can rotate freely over the upper inner column. 
- rotate the steering wheel (and upper outer column) until the directional signal cam is centered between the directional signal trigger lobes.
- loosen and remove the bolt down at the lower steering rack clamp (#13). Pull the lower steering column off of the steering rack splines. 
- rotate the lower steering column until the flat spot on the inner upper column is flush with the notch in the upper outer column. While doing this, verify the upper outer column hasn’t changed the centered position of the directional signal cam. 
- once the upper columns are aligned, replace and tighten the upper steering column clamp (#5-10) locking the inner and outer upper columns together. - verify the directional signal cam is still centered and fit the lower column back on the steering rack splines.
- reinsert the bolt on the the lower steering rack clamp and tighten 
- recenter the steering wheel if needed. 

Note - the reason the adjustment is done via the steering rack clamp, is the notch for that clamp bolt goes completely around the splines, allowing the bolt to be positioned anywhere. All the other column clamp bolts must be located at flat spots on those column splines. 

Jim

340D62D9-085E-4A8C-B752-3F74C7B5ACC9.jpeg

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And when you have corrected the positioning of the clip, consider connecting a small buzzer in parallel with the indicator lamp on the dashboard.  The, even with the car open and travelling at speed, you will be warned if you have forgotten to cancel the trafficator.

Ian Cornish

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This is probably a counsel of perfection but if one follows the well proven Roadcraft system of car control it will obviate the risk of leaving a signal uncancelled. The Information phase (taking using and giving) runs throughout the systematic negotiation of any hazard. If you have considered the need for a signal (only to be given when it could benefit another road user) and decided to apply one then when your change of direction/manoeuvre is complete your continued consideration of the need for the signal will automatically prompt you to check that it has cancelled when no longer required. Remember that even a properly functioning self cancelling mechanism  may not operate, for example when a turn is followed by a bend in the same direction.

Tim

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Delightfully phrased, Tim!  Must remember that when next I'm driving the horse and cart, and correctly twirling my whip to indicate a change in direction (where's my old copy of the Highway Code?).

In bright sunlight, it's difficult to tell whether the dash light is or is not flashing, and that's why I installed a buzzer many years ago.  Frightens any new passenger when first it sounds - it needs to be quite loud to be heard over engine noise!

Ian Cornish

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Hi Ian, don’t chastise Tim for his comments, I have to agree with him, yes, I am obviously not doing what I was trained to do, or trained others to do in that my observations were lacking on the indicator light however I have to agree with you that the green warning light is difficult to see. I must point out that I am a retired Police Sergeant and previously a Class One Police Driver Training Officer and lastly a Civilian Trainer however that was 24 years ago. I should know better however rather than being chastised could we keep to the subject in point please. I cannot give any feedback on the advice yet as I have to try and rectify the mechanical problem.

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9 hours ago, tim hunt said:

If you have considered the need for a signal (only to be given when it could benefit another road user) 

I could never see the point of the text in parentheses. What if there's someone that you haven't seen?

Pete

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12 hours ago, stillp said:

I could never see the point of the text in parentheses. What if there's someone that you haven't seen?

Pete

Many years ago doing my HGV training my instructor who was a stickler for details always said the same, if theres no one else to indicate for then dont as you should be aware of all your surroundings at all times, same as the then current Police drivers manual.

Stuart.

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Yes, I know it's in all the driver training manuals Stuart, but the only disadvantage I can see of signalling when there's no-one about is that in some drivers it might encourage the "I'm signalling so it must be safe to turn" mentality. During a test, not signalling when there's no-one about shows the examiner that you're aware of your surroundings, but in normal driving I think it preferable to always signal, just in case there's someone you haven't seen.

Pete

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What bugs me, are the drivers who only start signalling as they enter the turn.  The signal is supposed to inform other road users what you are intending to do, not what you are actually doing.  :angry:

Bob.

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'Honest John' stated in one of his replies a couple of years back to always indicate no mater who is around.

The other day some slightly tinted person braked suddenly in front of me and then eventually indicate to pull into a lay-by. One day he will do that with a lorry behind him. 

 

Roger

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You should only signal when there  is someone else to see it who will benefit from knowing your intended change of direction. this shows you are aware of your surroundings and other road users. If you just throw it on as a matter of course this leads to drivers just turning without paying due care and attention. Thats why the offence is called  driving without due care and attention. Bob is quite right in what he says, some drivers think they have the right of way just because they have thrown the signal on and are faster onto the roundabout or whatever than someone else. They are wrong. As regards to the person signalling very late and braking sharply as Roger mentioned, we have all met these I am sure, and had a near miss me included. The fact is the rules say you should be travelling at a distance behind the vehicle in front to be able to stop should they suddenly stop for whatever reason (even a dumb one) and the fault will seen by insurance (and Police)as the person behind travelling to close or fast to stop. This is not a rant just the way it is.

Paul

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I'm with the indicate no matter who is about school of thought. There is no "get out of jail comment in the Highway code about unless there are no other road users present" which can be used in a defence if you don't and the worst happens causing an accident. 

It embraces muscle memory (in this case your brain) and does not require formative thought ie it's a turning I'm about to take ...indicate in advance. You obviously will observe all seen road traffic and obey any signage about how to behave when making the turn also then there is no possibility of missing an unseen pedestrian or car and because you didn't indicate killing them. It also conforms to the Highway code and obviates the forthcoming police charge of failing to indicate which will be endorsed by the CPS on the basis of " our numbers are down...do him "

Mick Richards  

Edited by Motorsport Mickey
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Through long observation I have concluded that the indicators on most 'white vans' are coupled to the steering wheel so they come on as it turns, and that the four-way flashers are connected to the handbrake. 

 

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On 9/10/2020 at 11:52 AM, ianc said:

 

In bright sunlight, it's difficult to tell whether the dash light is or is not flashing, and that's why I installed a buzzer many years ago.  Frightens any new passenger when first it sounds - it needs to be quite loud to be heard over engine noise!

Ian Cornish

I changed all the dash lamps to LED type, including the indicator lamp.  I can now see that quite clearly even with the top down and in sunlight.  Less embarrassing than a buzzer.  Mike.

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I agree that if in doubt it is better to signal than not. However, strict application of The System throughout a hazard or manoeuvre ensures the need for a signal is continuously considered and it is applied immediately if required. I am sure we have all seen a driver who thoughtlessly signals a left or right turn before leaving their own drive, no doubt the same unorganised type that Bob mentions who signals post facto on the road. If I am approaching a blind crossroads on a rural road on which I have priority and at which I plan to turn left and there is no  vehicle behind so close that it would need to alter course or speed to accommodate my manoeuvre then I would decide at the start of the Information phase not to signal. I would continuously scan  the junction into which I plan to turn  and should a vehicle appear I would apply the left indicator. Since the other driver should have seen the signal applied it should give them some confidence that I do indeed intend to turn and have not simply failed to cancel an earlier signal, although they must of course still be looking for me to slow down before pulling out.

So true Pete, I always allow six blinks of the indicator warning light before changing course.

I am delighted that my earlier post prompted this interesting exchange, confirming my view that in general classic car users are interested in driving as an art. After all we have no modern driver aids to get us out of trouble so we tend to be more conscious of changing road conditions and by honed observation and anticipation make extra allowance for other road users in our driving plans.

Tim

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Thanks everyone for your help and assistance and also the developed and entertaining conversation re associated Matters.

However with your help I have changed the inner column so that the cancelling clip is in its correct position (24 years late) still didn’t cancel, so rightly or wrongly I inserted a shim between the clip and column which moved it closer to the switch mechanism and low and behold the indicators now cancel so I can now fully apply my mind and body to a particular endeavour and to the complete exclusion of anything not relevant to that endeavour i.e faulty indicator.

Edited by Vic787
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19 hours ago, Vic787 said:

Thanks everyone for your help and assistance and also the developed and entertaining conversation re associated Matters.

However with your help I have changed the inner column so that the cancelling clip is in its correct position (24 years late) still didn’t cancel, so rightly or wrongly I inserted a shim between the clip and column which moved it closer to the switch mechanism and low and behold the indicators now cancel so I can now fully apply my mind and body to a particular endeavour and to the complete exclusion of anything not relevant to that endeavour i.e faulty indicator.

Hi

As you will see from my original reply to you I thought it might be that the switch and the cancelling clip were just too far apart to work since I have had this as well. Rather than shim the cancelling clip I moved the switch towards the clip. The cancelling clip locates in a 'slot' on the column to keep it in the correct position. I would be concerned that the shim might fall out as you are driving along depending on how you have fitted it.

Keith

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