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I have a couple of pin holes in my fuel tank, will POR15 cure this, or is there a better product. tank is out of the car, so easy to swirl the stuff about.

Or if someone has a good TR4 tank I would be glad to hear from them.

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IMO, a better repair would be with solder from the outside of the tank.

Many people, including me, consider an internal tank sealer as a last resort to save an otherwise unrepairable tank.  Sealers, like many other coatings, depend heavily on surface preparation for good adhesion. Adequate surface prep can be very difficult inside a closed space, especially since you can't see many inside areas.

If a sealer fails, and they sometimes do, you're actually in a worse position than before the sealer, since your repair options are more limited.

Ed

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Hi pete,

Plus 1 for what Ed said and

If you have one or two pinholes that are leaking you can bet that there will be more just lurking below the surface. Sloshing round may dislodge more and you end up chasing your tail. 

I would firstly beg borrow an endoscope and have a real good look at the inside of the tank and make a judgement thereafter.

For a good seal you really have to get the surface as clean as possible, using abrasive materials which in turn loosens the rust scale and exposes more holes.

It really depends on what quality restoration your are doing!

Rod

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I would agree that Sloshing is NOT the answer to pinholes, for the reasons explained above.  If there are pinholes already, you can bet that more will follow!

In 1997, my oversize (18 gallon), steel tank was in good condition apart from the shedding of fine particles into the petrol and thence to the pump.  Sloshing sealed the internal surface and all has been well for the past 23 years.

Ian Cornish

 

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On 8/15/2020 at 3:49 PM, ed_h said:

IMO, a better repair would be with solder from the outside of the tank.

Many people, including me, consider an internal tank sealer as a last resort to save an otherwise unrepairable tank.  Sealers, like many other coatings, depend heavily on surface preparation for good adhesion. Adequate surface prep can be very difficult inside a closed space, especially since you can't see many inside areas.

If a sealer fails, and they sometimes do, you're actually in a worse position than before the sealer, since your repair options are more limited.

Ed

I go along with Ed - external soldering.  Make sure that ALL the internal AND external rust is removed.

Tin the surface first and then apply a reasonable thickness of solder.  You do not even have to paint it afterwards.

 

Roger

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I suppose there are several failure modes, but on my TR6 tank. The pitting that led to the pin holes was all on the OUTSIDE of the tank.

Ed

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