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New 1962, whoops, 1960 TR3 A Owner


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Plus 1 on David Tushingham Cheftush. nice guy who's has done some restorations of seriously decayed TR's. In Ontario and knows a lot about the cars, can put you onto "Yank" terminology and also s

David, if you have registered and can log on to the members only part of the site you can access workshop manuals etc from there and should be able to find a wiring diagram. The horn button simply ear

Hi David, Nice car, pretty sure that there must be more TR owners in your area. Enjoy the TR! Yves

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Posted (edited)

My TR3 A was born on March 24th, 1960 and immediately emigrated to the USA.

Question, how important is it in terms of valuation not to have the original engine?

 

 

Edited by David Owen
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David, the so-called matching numbers cars are theoretically more sought after than the bitzahs but it is debatable if it adds much more value. If you had two identical cars the one with all original bits would likely win but a crappy car with original engine etc would not be preferred to an otherwise presentable car with a non original engine. In my opinion.

Stan

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2 hours ago, foster461 said:

The so-called matching numbers cars are theoretically more sought after.

1+

Stan, yes, would be interesting to know how many TR have factory replacement engines.

Also, let's say you have a beautifully rebuilt TR4 block and head, as opposed to a very tired original TR2 or TR3. I know which one I'd prefer, and better still if it is cheaper.

Edited by DavidBee
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Thanks guys.  The engine is definitely an earlier model being a TS303xx and the car a TS717xx.

So now my education begins. 

For safety sake I had a pro install a new front suspension and steering kit, the parking break and rear lever shocks.  There was also a time element to this, it took 6 weeks to get the parts due to Covid and we have a limited driving season here so I am working on my to do list for the winter.  I should haqve the car back in the next day or so.

I think the frame is slightly bent but the car tracks well. Misalignment of the bonnet and boot on one side is the leading symptom.  There are some bangs and messy welds under there but it is in reasonable shape.  Live and learn. 

The biggest surprise so far is the small pebble found in the CARBURETTOR!

 

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So I have decided this one will be a daily driver, at least in the spring, cooler summer and fall. It is too much of a mish mash of parts to restore.  I do want to paint it so I was wondering what the optimum strip down would be to do this without doing a complete frame off?

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On 8/9/2020 at 3:10 PM, David Owen said:

So I have decided this one will be a daily driver, at least in the spring, cooler summer and fall. It is too much of a mish mash of parts to restore.  I do want to paint it so I was wondering what the optimum strip down would be to do this without doing a complete frame off?

It looks   pretty good from the pictures and a bit of patina is not a bad thing. You could take off the windshield, capping, easily removable chrome and then mask up the rest. To go beyond that would be removing wings etc and that will likely be a can of worms.

Whitewalls are not my cup of tea but they were a factory option so I'm not sure why some people have such a hard time over them.

Stan

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, foster461 said:

It looks   pretty good from the pictures and a bit of patina is not a bad thing. You could take off the windshield, capping, easily removable chrome and then mask up the rest. To go beyond that would be removing wings etc and that will likely be a can of worms.

Whitewalls are not my cup of tea but they were a factory option so I'm not sure why some people have such a hard time over them.

Stan

 

Thanks Stan.  Whitewalls are a North American thing I think.  I like it both regular and whitewall tires....and my wife pretty much ordered them. ;)

I need to think about this because there are some very amateur welds around the passenger door (looks like I did it) that I would like to clean up and some rust here and there.  There is also uneven spqacing on the boot lid and the bonnet.  Am I being overly finicky on that?

 

IMG_4066.jpeg

IMG_4067.jpeg

 

I know the hinges are out of alignment and it may be that simple.

Edited by David Owen
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There is not much lateral wiggle room in those hinges without making elongated holes in the bonnet and/or scuttle. I have a similar problem and I have opted not to fix it at this time. life is too short. Door will be easy to fix and repaint. Show us some pictures of the rusty bits.

 

Stan

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My bonnet (sorry, Hood) is tight to the bulkhead in the same place, but aligning it with the scuttle throws out the wing and front panel gaps. Early hoods did not have a return edge at the back and could be easily ground back for clearance, but mine is a later type with the return edge which makes it hard to alter. I would do as Ian suggests and bend the r/h side out to close up that gap to the wing.

Ralph.

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I read in another thread (fuel octane thread) that there was an adjustment for the range of movement necessary to fully depress the clutch pedal.  I looked in the Service Instruction Manual clutch section and couldn't find any reference to that.  Am I looking in the wrong place?

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There isn't really any such adjustment - the master cylinder and slave cylinder pushrods do have length adjustment but it isn't for that purpose, it is to set the correct clearances.

What are you trying to achieve?

The nearest thing to what you describe is the connection of the slave cylinder to the clutch operating arm. There are three holes on the clutch operating arm and the slave-cylinder pushrod should be connected to the middle one.  Using the top hole would shorten pedal travel but increase the pedal load considerably, so maybe not a good idea. Using the bottom hole would lighten the pedal load but the pedal travel would be very long and may not be enough to fully disengage the clutch. 

 

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4 minutes ago, RobH said:

There isn't really any such adjustment - the master cylinder and slave cylinder pushrods do have length adjustment but it isn't for that purpose, it is to set the correct clearances.

What are you trying to achieve?

The nearest thing to what you describe is the connection of the slave cylinder to the clutch operating arm. There are three holes on the clutch operating arm and the slave-cylinder pushrod should be connected to the middle one.  Using the top hole would shorten pedal travel but increase the pedal load considerably, so maybe not a good idea. Using the bottom hole would lighten the pedal load but the pedal travel would be very long and may not be enough to fully disengage the clutch. 

 

 

 

Short legs.  Need to bring the maximum clutch pedal depression about 4" closer.

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Ah - I can sympathise.  In my case the answer is to sit closer to the wheel. More of an old-fashioned elbows-out position than the modern arms-length style. 

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Posted (edited)
27 minutes ago, RobH said:

Ah - I can sympathise.  In my case the answer is to sit closer to the wheel. More of an old-fashioned elbows-out position than the modern arms-length style. 

I was thinking of having an extension welded to the clutch pedal.  Not sure about the safety issue though. 

Edited by David Owen
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Check out what father Murray and daughter joy Rainey achieved with restricted height. 
I first met them in the late 1970’s When they raced vintage Alfa’s  6c etc

https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/24120/lot/211/

they used to have modified pedals etc 

 

Edited by Hamish
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8 hours ago, Hamish said:

Check out what father Murray and daughter joy Rainey achieved with restricted height. 
I first met them in the late 1970’s When they raced vintage Alfa’s  6c etc

https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/24120/lot/211/

they used to have modified pedals etc 

 


Nice.  That’s encouraging. An extra brake and clutch pedal assembly just arrived and I will modify that one hopefully successfully, if not I get a practice run. 
 

Thank you. 

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I can sympathize. At 5' 6" and shrinking I have the seat all the way forward and I'm fully extended to operate the clutch. I find it manageable but if it was any worse I would bend the clutch pedal arm to move the pedal closer. I blame chain smoking parents and poor 1950's nutrition.

Stan

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21 minutes ago, foster461 said:

I can sympathize. At 5' 6" and shrinking I have the seat all the way forward and I'm fully extended to operate the clutch. I find it manageable but if it was any worse I would bend the clutch pedal arm to move the pedal closer. I blame chain smoking parents and poor 1950's nutrition.

Stan

I was 5'9" and refuse to change any vital stats.

 

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8 hours ago, foster461 said:

I can sympathize. At 5' 6" and shrinking I have the seat all the way forward and I'm fully extended to operate the clutch. I find it manageable but if it was any worse I would bend the clutch pedal arm to move the pedal closer. I blame chain smoking parents and poor 1950's nutrition.

Stan

 

On 8/13/2020 at 3:17 PM, David Owen said:

 

 

Short legs.  Need to bring the maximum clutch pedal depression about 4" closer.

I have put my 3a together with a TR4 flywheel which I re drilled to take a diaphram (is that right spelling?) clutch, and find there is no need to press the pedal all the way down as it releases and engages gears easily at 3 inches or so travel and is quite light to operate.

Ralph.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Ralph Whitaker said:

 

I have put my 3a together with a TR4 flywheel which I re drilled to take a diaphram (is that right spelling?) clutch, and find there is no need to press the pedal all the way down as it releases and engages gears easily at 3 inches or so travel and is quite light to operate.

Ralph.

 

Thanks Ralph,

Unfortunately I think at this point that is a little beyond my capabilities.  But I will research it and see what it entails. 

David

PS.  There was a joke in there somewhere about being saved by a diaphragm in the past.

Edited by David Owen
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