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Hi all,

looking for the name of the following, so I can buy one.

Small 'Bit' that you pop in a drill, has a cone shaped end with a blade, used to trim the end of a cut bolt, threaded bar etc.

Cheers,

John.

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Hi John

  Laser tool no. 7510 external deburr/chamfer tool, guide price £16.87+vat.

                                                     Regards

                                           Harvey S.Maitland

                                         

 

     

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Please report back on how well it works please.

I am still old school using a flat file and a thread file if the thread is really  mangled.

Cheers

Peter W

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I use a lathe  :rolleyes: (or a grindstone)

Bob.

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18 minutes ago, Lebro said:

I use a lathe  :rolleyes: (or a grindstone)

Bob.

...and while we are on that Bob how do you sharpen tools and drills?  

Do you use an universal tool and cutter grinder?

Peter W

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Bench grinder with two sorts of wheel (green one for carbide tipped)

For small drills I use a simple jig which attaches to a hand drill.

bOB.

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Just to explain, I have some cut down wheel studs on the car, which could be neater,

thought this would dress then up in situ.

John.

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Just the thing for insitu dressing, but I'd still run a tap down them after.

Jhn

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15 hours ago, BlueTR3A-5EKT said:

Please report back on how well it works please.

I am still old school using a flat file and a thread file if the thread is really  mangled.

Cheers

Peter W

Same here!

Stuart.

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I simply used a (female) tap, it does not remove material in these cases, just rectifies the profile. 
Waldi

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Sorry, Waldi, I should have said 'Die' - female tap!

John

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Aha, learned something new today.
male = tap
female = die

Thank’s John.

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On 3/12/2020 at 6:58 PM, BlueTR3A-5EKT said:

Please report back on how well it works please.

I am still old school using a flat file and a thread file if the thread is really  mangled.

Cheers

Peter W

Me too.

A Die Nut is easy to run down a burred thread to clean it up without removing extra material.

Dave McD

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Not so easy on four studs on a car, I've ordered the tool and will report back on the effect,

I will run a nut up the stud prior to tool use, so that will help with thread cleaning on removal.

John.

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I've often wondered why 'proper' dies, to be used in a die holder, and Die Nuts, were available.   

So a die nut is for cleaning up a thread, a 'proper' die for cutting it in the first place?  Thanks, Dave!

 

I've made my own die nuts before, to clean up a stud thread, by cutting slots inside across the threads.   Works well, but probably single use only and throw away.

John

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10 hours ago, john.r.davies said:

I've often wondered why 'proper' dies, to be used in a die holder, and Die Nuts, were available.   

So a die nut is for cleaning up a thread, a 'proper' die for cutting it in the first place?  Thanks, Dave!

 

I've made my own die nuts before, to clean up a stud thread, by cutting slots inside across the threads.   Works well, but probably single use only and throw away.

John

Yes John, spot on.

I've also used the hacksaw cut in a conventional nut solution when the die nuts aren't to hand.

Dave

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The problem with a die nut or a but with slots cut in is getting it started.

If the first few threads are damaged you may well end up damaging more threads

The picture below came up on the TSSC forum last year.

It is a clamp of hardened split nuts You clamp it in the middle where the threads may well be OK and unwind to clean the start threads.

Genius - but long gone.

Roger

Die Nut.jpeg

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What a brilliant bit of kit Roger. I'd snap it up like a shot if I ever saw one. Just goes to show the simplest ideas are the best!

Tim

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'tis sold

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Hi John,

I think the item below qualifies as the tool for the job, it is called a ROST – Restorer Of Spoilt Threads

A fully engineered solution for dealing with damaged threads, thought to be from the 1930’s, however it is limited to three thread types – BSF, Whit and Metric.

Regards, Richard

 

4.jpg

3.jpg

2.jpg

1.jpg

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3 minutes ago, RAHTR4 said:

Hi John,

I think the item below qualifies as the tool for the job, it is called a ROST – Restorer Of Spoilt Threads

A fully engineered solution for dealing with damaged threads, thought to be from the 1930’s, however it is limited to three thread types – BSF, Whit and Metric.

Regards, Richard

 

4.jpg

3.jpg

2.jpg

1.jpg

That's a clever bit of kit.

Dave McD

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