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Richardtr3a

Rear wheel studs on the Girling back wheel

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I came home from the Southdown Group Summer Event, this evening, with a vibration from the RHS rear wheel. At home I took off the brake drum and it was not the brakes but three of the wheel studs were loose. 

Is it advisable to remove the hub and have the welder fix it or should I approach Revington who have an answer?   I am not sure of the detail of their kit. Does anyone know or have experience of their repair kit?

It looks as if a new hub is not available, from Moss any way and mine is the original which came with the car as new, so I am keen to keep it..

What is the best repair?

Thanks Richard & B.

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          The studs are shouldered and are fitted from the wheel side then peened over on the axle side. They can be drilled out and later studs fitted which are splined and driven in from the axle side.

          Cheers 

                       Richard and the greyhounds

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Revington uses repair studs with a slightly oversized thread. You will need to remove the half shaft from the axle to effect a proper repair. 

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Thanks .I will call them this morning. Welding is not a good idea??

Richard & B.

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richard

remove the existing studs , then remove the half shaft , drill out the holes to take Knock in TR6 studs  which you can easily insert with the shaft removed.

graham

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Do the studs screw back into the hub securely?  If it were mine I'd remove the flange assembly and re peen the back of the stud as original.  A touch of weld would do the same thing to secure the stud from unscrewing out of the flange .  

If the thread is worn or stripped in the flange then you will need to either use oversize studs or use pull through studs like the front hubs have on a Girling car.  

Note. The pull through studs do not have a shoulder for the brake drum to mount on, so you may conclude your drums are loose on the studs.

 

Peter W

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I am looking for a used back hub . If you know anyone who can help please let me know.

Richard & B.

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9 minutes ago, Richardtr3a said:

I am looking for a used back hub . If you know anyone who can help please let me know.

Richard & B.

Why would you want a hub flange unless it has been bent when attempting to remove from half shaft.? 

Screw the studs back in a snot a bit of MIG weld on the back.  Job takes longer to get the wheel and drum off than the actual repair.

Cheers

Peter W

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Three of the studs are loose and the movement has damaged the hub extension. I have a good one on the shelf but the loose studs are in poor shape and one is pulling through. I used a long lever to get the nuts tight and one has given up. I drove round the block and the original noise has gone.

I would feel happier with an old one in good condition. If I have to have a new one which is the best make,if available ?

Thanks Richard & B.

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Hi all , so today doing a bit of pre MOT checks on my 1964 TR4 (yes I know its exempt).

Found one loose stud on the rear hub (wire wheels), looks like a poor repair in the past as it has some pigeon cr*p weld. Also fond the outer gease hub seal also looks like it leaking, but not on shoes yet.

 

Question: has anybody had any practical experience of the oversized Revington repair stud (RTR1385) and do they work?

Also how hard will it be to get the rear hub off the half shaft to replace the seal? 

Mark

Edited by MRG1965

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Removing the rear hub from the half shaft requires a 20 ton press and someone who knows what they are doing to avoid bending the  flange on the half shaft. 

I ended up with two bent flanges when I took mine to a shop that didn’t know what they were doing.

Rgds Ian

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Thanks Ian, yes I assumed it would need quite some force. I understand now why the flange has some battle scars. When I first got the car I had to dress the edge where the drum fits over the flange to be able to get drum back as it had been forced back in to place. The manual just say use þool M.86A as if its feather duster to remove the flange.

 

Mark

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1 hour ago, MRG1965 said:

Thanks Ian, yes I assumed it would need quite some force. I understand now why the flange has some battle scars. When I first got the car I had to dress the edge where the drum fits over the flange to be able to get drum back as it had been forced back in to place. The manual just say use tool M.86A as if its feather duster to remove the flange.

 

Mark

Using M.86A is a reliable way to remove the flange without bending it.  Can be used on the car without removing the half shaft.   Not all flanges want to come off though, as Stuart will no doubt confirm.

I used to do a removal service with my M.86A but the uncertainty of extraction, stuff that has been 'got at' previously, plus carriage to and from, has made me very shy of offering that service now.

NB  Fit a 1/8" solid pin in the split pin hole before pressing on the shaft end.  I have the shank of a drill, cut to thread diameter that can be fitted before refitting a solid nut.   This action will reduce/eliminate thread crush when the press volume is turned up to 11!.

 

Cheers

Peter W

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55 minutes ago, BlueTR3A-5EKT said:

Using M.86A is a reliable way to remove the flange without bending it.  Can be used on the car without removing the half shaft.   Not all flanges want to come off though, as Stuart will no doubt confirm.

I used to do a removal service with my M.86A but the uncertainty of extraction, stuff that has been 'got at' previously, plus carriage to and from, has made me very shy of offering that service now.

NB  Fit a 1/8" solid pin in the split pin hole before pressing on the shaft end.  I have the shank of a drill, cut to thread diameter that can be fitted before refitting a solid nut.   This action will reduce/eliminate thread crush when the press volume is turned up to 11!.

 

Cheers

Peter W

Thanks for the advice Peter, if you still have the tool and are willing to loan, I'd be happy to cover postage both ways plus something for your self, no come back on you.

If not, no problem.

 

Mark

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TBH If your going to change to press fit studs like the front then its possible to fit them without removing the hub anyway, you might have to just grind a little chamfer off the flange of the stud depending on how long a stud you want to fit but I have 1/2" longer studs fitted to mine to cope with Minilites and they fitted in from the rear with the shaft and hub in the vice no problem.

Stuart.

FWIW I do have the Churchill hub puller but it only really works with standard wheel studs as the flange is very thick.

 

photo1134.jpg

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Thanks Stuart, I'm undecided if I need to repair or go for the later splined studs. I'm assuming that I would just need to remove the existing studs, drill out to the hub to the correct interference size (whatever that may be) or is the existing threaded hole okay and just pull them through using a suitable nut? But if that's all that's required, then I might just go for  that as it would be  much better solution to me and  I can forget about another one failing in the future.

 

The main reason for removing the hub is the outer grease seal appears to be leaking, but I may just clean up and keep an eye on that as I did not feel any issues with the bearing, but I'll double check the end float just to be sure.

Sounds like I'd have to replace the suds with the steel wheel length to remove the hub and then cut them down to the correct wire wheel length after.

I see Rimmers do a puller RX1542, but this appears to be for the Sptifire so may be smaller.

 

Mark 

Edited by MRG1965

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You would have to drill out to the slightly larger size and then pull in with a nut, the studs are splined so need to be a tight interference fit. I used new studs from Cambridge Motorsport as theyre a harder steel than the usual supplier ones. You may find the grease leaking is due to over zealous greasing of the rear hubs which is a common complaint.

Stuart.

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1 hour ago, stuart said:

You would have to drill out to the slightly larger size and then pull in with a nut, the studs are splined so need to be a tight interference fit. I used new studs from Cambridge Motorsport as theyre a harder steel than the usual supplier ones. You may find the grease leaking is due to over zealous greasing of the rear hubs which is a common complaint.

Stuart.

Thanks, I'll look them up. yes the grease may very well be me, although the other side is fine, but I'll just keep an eye on it for now.

 

Many thanks.

 

Mark

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Studs ordered.

They have lots of shiny and expensive parts, they also have new hubs for  reasonable price too, so if it all goes pear shaped I know where to get new ones from.

Mark

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I’ve fitted standard length studs and use them with a 6mm spacer behind the wire wheel adaptors. That way I can use bolt on wheels if I wish or if I’m unlucky enough to suffer a double puncture when on tour with a group I can borrow any spare rather than seek out a knock on. 

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