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ijonsson

Carbs and summer

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Well, summer temperatures in Sweden at last, and with that some, probably, fuel issues in the TR2, plugs look nice and fuel consumption is approximately 28 mpg. Nothing serious, but running slow at narrow roads is causing a bit of misfire after a while. I have put in a duct from behind the grill up to the carbs but no duct fan. What I want to ask is if anyone has tried put in a heat shield below the carbs, it will not make much difference to hot air below the bonnet, but would take away some radiation heat. Another heat related issue I've been considering is what good an electric water pump would do? I already have an electric pushing fan installed.

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Have you tried lagging the fuel pipe from the pump? Moving this pipe to the rear of the engine does help keep the fuel cool. Why do you want to change the water pump, is the engine temperature over the normal maximum? If all is well with a standard engine and radiator then a standard pump should work fine. Be very wary of pumps that spin too fast and/or have any sharp edges on the impeller else it will cavitate. Even micro bubbles from an over enthusiastic pump will reduce the water's thermal mass and so it's ability to cool.  

I assume the link pipe between the carbs is on top, not below the carbs as some side-screen cars were.  It'd be interesting to know what % of Ethanol is in your petrol.

Else, increasing (or not obstructing) cool air over the carbs is probably the way. ANY lamps or badges in front of the grille do reduce air flow by making it more turbulent and less conductive as it passes through the fins.

The four-vent bonnets release more hot air but let more rain water in!

Mike

 

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Fuel pipe from pump/filter goes in front of engine and hasn't any lagging, fuel pipe between carbs is the old rigid type above. Engine is a lowport but an TR3 block. Our fuel, all types can hold up to 5% Ethanol.

Regarding electric pump was just a thought to keep flow high regardless of engine revs. I have a new, but old type of radiator, with hole for starting crank. I have extra spotlights but they are placed to the sides. The water pump is, if I recall right from Moss, and the 5-vane type. The electric fan keeps temperature down at low speed, but not as low as running at 60 mph without electric fan working. I have a modern type of thermostat and reduced area in the by-pass.

 

Edited by ijonsson

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Inge

I have similar experience with my TR2 with a low port head and 87 mm pistons it has a fixed fan. long slow hill climbs and congestion cause pinking and miss fires.

I blame the ethanol in Scottish fuel  as the car runs  better on fuel in  England.

The higher octaine fuels are better  where available, which is not everywhere in Scotland.

Maybe  we should add paraffin to the petrol as suggested in TR action. 

 

Ewan

 

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Try and avoid any fuels with ethanol - which absorbs moisture- in France this means using leadfree 98. I find that even a 3 week lay up in my garage causes my 3A to spit and fart for 20 minutes or so.

james

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Ethanol requires more ignition advance but how much is an open question when we don't know what % is in any batch of fuel. I think there is a need to collect some TR ignition data and I have a cunning plan well, more of a vision! 

The standard fan is fairly ineffective at very  low car speeds and at idle, it just drifts air past the radiator and at high speed, it gets in the way as the incoming air is faster above <>50mph  None of this mattered much in the old days but it does now. An electric fan is the way to go. The starter crank hole in the rad is not just a hole, it blocks the tubes above and below it. Maybe 20% loss of cooling area, a rad without it is way better (sorry!) I'm a keep-it-standard person but the fan and hole-less rad became essential for touring.

James' comment about water, ethanol being hygroscopic, is an interesting one. I don't think we know too much about fuel with water and its effect on vaporisation. I'll ask Paul.

Mike

 

 

 

 

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