Jump to content

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, Bfg said:

^ you did it yourself.  If you don't have a lathe - that's particularly impressive B)

The GT6 clutch is a different part number but I don't know whether the diaphragm cover is different,  or the spine friction plate's,  or perhaps the thrust bearing,  &/or any combination of those.

I do have a lathe, but did not need it for this, just lay the flywheel on a flat surface, place the clutch cover on it, & then move it around until you get the same distance to the edge of flywheel all the way round, then mark the center of each hole on the flywheel, center punch then drill. 

The splines on the driven plate are different to TR, but they match the splines on my saloon gearbox.

Bob.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 1.4k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Pete - DON'T give up with owning a TR - there are other cars out there - just put the word out on here and elsewhere and I'm sure something will come up Chin up  Cheers Rich

Or these people? http://www.leacyclassics.com/parts/classicmini/engine-components/2k7440.html Roger

. Carrying on from TR4 -v- Tr4A engine, and my purchasing a 'spare'  < here >  ..so that I might get on and have an engine ready by the time the Chance is actually bought and shipped,  we h

Posted Images

On 12/18/2019 at 9:27 PM, BlueTR3A-5EKT said:

Point 1.  No you cannot get the flywheel drilled for the bolt on ring gear due to size and that it fits from the clutch side of the flywheel. 

That statement stopped me in my tracks.

... but thinking back to the following illustration.  Are your sure ?

ENGINE SIDE 2098994278_TR4andTR4aflywheellightening-removeshadedpart..thumb.jpg.fdee7f77458a720ae451a2ac645391e0.jpgCLUTCH SIDE

^ illustration of David Vizard regarding where one might lighten each type.  

Looking afresh this evening makes me think the TR3 flywheel (I have) might have its flange recess re-machined to take the deeper bolt-on TR4A ring gear, with plenty of metal (before weight reduction as illustrated) to drill and tap into.  I acknowledge the 4A bendix starter gear engages from the clutch side, whereas the shrouded type engage from the engine side .. but it strikes me that on both flywheels the gear ring is fitted onto the engine side.

 

8842862_orig.jpg

^  1965 TR4A engine courtesy of Paul Anderson on Weebly < here

Pete.

I could really do with borrowing a TR4A flywheel,  to lend to the machine shop to ensure they get the geometry correct.

 

Edited by Bfg
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Bfg said:

That statement stopped me in my tracks.

... but thinking back to the following illustration.  Are your sure ?

ENGINE SIDE 2098994278_TR4andTR4aflywheellightening-removeshadedpart..thumb.jpg.fdee7f77458a720ae451a2ac645391e0.jpgCLUTCH SIDE

^ illustration of David Vizard regarding where one might lighten each type.  

Looking afresh this evening makes me think the TR3 flywheel (I have) might have its flange recess re-machined to take the deeper bolt-on TR4A ring gear, with plenty of metal (before weight reduction as illustrated) to drill and tap into.  I acknowledge the 4A bendix starter gear engages from the clutch side, whereas the shrouded type engage from the engine side .. but it strikes me that on both flywheels the gear ring is fitted onto the engine side.

 

8842862_orig.jpg

^  1965 TR4A engine courtesy of Paul Anderson on Weebly < here

Pete.

Humble pie time

Sorry for that. I got it wrong.  The bolt on ring gear fits from the same side as shrink on. The bolts are there to stop it being pushed off by the be bendix  I guess. 

Peter W

Link to post
Share on other sites

That's absolutely fine Peter -  I appreciate your, and everyone else,  pointing such things out to me ..because I simply don't have the experience to know where to look or the right questions to ask.   And I'd much prefer a little thing like this ..rather than to make an assumption myself - and then find it won't work after I've couple the engine to a gearbox and the starter motor, and fitted into the car.!     I thank you..  not least because I'm very happy right now as I go off to bed  :D

Pete

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

36 minutes ago, Lebro said:

I do have a lathe, but did not need it for this, just lay the flywheel on a flat surface, place the clutch cover on it, & then move it around until you get the same distance to the edge of flywheel all the way round, then mark the center of each hole on the flywheel, center punch then drill. 

I still think that's pretty impressive Bob.  B)  

I would have centered the flywheel on a lathe,  and then shallow v-grooved the cover's fastening holes p.c.d. to centre it.,  and then of course marked off the hole spacing around that groove.  

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, that would work. My Lathe is nowhere near big enough to take a flywheel though !

I don't have any vibration to speak of, but when I finally get around to re-building my engine I will have it all balanced properly.

Don't know when that will be as it just keeps on going albeit with a few startup rattles.

It's at least 50 years since it was last worked on by the Triumph factory (an FRE engine)

Bob.

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Bfg said:

 

Pete.

I could really do with borrowing a TR4A flywheel,  to lend to the machine shop to ensure they get the geometry correct.

Pete - you can borrow my spare one - just call to arrange

cheers

Rich

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Rich, that's very kind of you.  There's a very good chance I'll be using J.D. Robertson, in Colchester, for the machining & balancing - which again I thank you for the contact details of and recommendation. The chap there is helpful and knowledgeable .. and also friendly and generous with his time - both of which appears less than common nowadays.   

Pete.

Link to post
Share on other sites

.

The distributor I bought with the engine is rusted up inside. 

The seller says he others, and he can let me have one - but needs to know the correct number (stamped into it ?) for the TR4A .  c.1965

Can anyone help with that please.? 

Thanks, Pete

Link to post
Share on other sites

You really should get a copy of the Moss catalogue Pete - all that sort of information is in there and it's free.

TR4 and 4A  is listed as type 25D4 Lucas number 40850

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

yesterday afternoon was less productive.

P1330124s.jpg.e95255f1ad81b2052555d58ddeb4c620.jpg

P1330128s.thumb.jpg.05c66217695dc5e9ec1b8e1e628488f4.jpg

P1330129s.jpg.26a4dc1a60cfd94f2943f0d52335cc41.jpg

P1330141s.jpg.4d07e02a8c3b90a81cda9ef0a55c2020.jpg

I see a stamp on the top of this which says 25D.  Is that correct for the 4A ?   The number stamped on the side is 40822A

P1330144as.jpg.766b5e6633b185d463c92b58d5ab306b.jpg

Distributor is not really salvageable, and even the cap has two chips out of it.

Pete.

 

Edited by Bfg
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, RobH said:

You really should get a copy of the Moss catalogue Pete - all that sort of information is in there and it's free.

TR4 and 4A  is listed as type 25D4 Lucas number 40850

 

Thank you Rob that's really helpful. 

As you recommended before I have one and also that for the TR5  on order.

Pete

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

53 minutes ago, RobH said:

TR4 and 4A  is listed as type 25D4 Lucas number 40850

 

oops not quite . . .

P1330147s.thumb.jpg.0acf79a61c5698e27cc518c29e71d7dd.jpg

^  cunning little catalogue can be misleading huh !

:unsure: I'll have to watch out for that

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Bfg said:

 

 

oops not quite . . .

P1330147s.thumb.jpg.0acf79a61c5698e27cc518c29e71d7dd.jpg

^  cunning little catalogue can be misleading huh !

:unsure: I'll have to watch out for that

 

Nice to see my text work and Peter Taylor's artwork and lay out is still in use.

Peter W

Edited by BlueTR3A-5EKT
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Lebro said:

Yes, that would work. My Lathe is nowhere near big enough to take a flywheel though !

I don't have any vibration to speak of, but when I finally get around to re-building my engine I will have it all balanced properly.

Don't know when that will be as it just keeps on going albeit with a few startup rattles.

It's at least 50 years since it was last worked on by the Triumph factory (an FRE engine)

Bob.

FWIW Bob, I balanced my flywheel and clutch myself.  I bought a bronze bush that was an interference fit in the centre of the flywheel (I had to put the bush in the freezer and the flywheel in the oven to get it to fit), and a couple of small ball bearings that were a snug fit in the bush and had a 1/4" bore.  I could spin the flywheel by hand and depending on how fast I spun it to start with it would keep going for up to 10 minutes before stopping.  I was able to get a consistent reading for the heavy side and drilled a couple of holes to balance it.  I then attached the clutch cover plate and repeated the process making sure I marked the alignment of the clutch cover plate.  It seems to have worked.

Rgds Ian

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, brenda said:

Pete, just got this out of Brenda is it ok if I send it down to you.

Well that's very kind of you,  I could do with a good spare. Thanks !

Pete. 

p.s. are you sure you don't want anything for it ? ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

While I see the point of balancing a replacement flywheel and clutch cover at home ..without having to take the crankshaft out -  I would not have thought it worth mucking around trying to balance the crankshaft itself.  I say this because I'd only take the crank out to have the journals machined ..while at the same time replacing bearings, so as it's at the machine shop why not have them balance it at the same time  + the flywheel + the clutch cover + the pulley and fan  (NB. some companies cannot do the latter because their balancing machine turns the crankshaft from the front).    

I very much applaud (with black finger nails myself) those who do things themselves at home, and most certainly it is better to balance these things statically rather than not at all,  but I wonder how accurate static balancing is compared to balancing at many rpm. ?    Even a small degree of out of balance on something the diameter of a flywheel would surely be felt a certain revs, unfortunately those revs might be at the crankshaft's harmonic resonance.? 

I do plan to match the weight of reciprocating parts myself, like the conrods & pistons,  but I'll leave the rotational balancing to a machine operator.

Pete 

edit.  I missed your edit as I wrote this reply :P

Edited by Bfg
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Please familiarise yourself with our Terms and Conditions. By using this site, you agree to the following: Terms of Use.