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Pete - DON'T give up with owning a TR - there are other cars out there - just put the word out on here and elsewhere and I'm sure something will come up Chin up  Cheers Rich

Or these people? http://www.leacyclassics.com/parts/classicmini/engine-components/2k7440.html Roger

. Carrying on from TR4 -v- Tr4A engine, and my purchasing a 'spare'  < here >  ..so that I might get on and have an engine ready by the time the Chance is actually bought and shipped,  we h

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Wiring task is mostly done . . .

I'm very pleased to say that my immediate work on the wiring is now all but done (..just a few wires to the wiper-motor need sleeving and securing) but everything electric (presently tried) works as it should. :rolleyes: 

The LED side lights and indicators (..particularly noticeable at the rear) are much brighter, and now thanks to Bob - we even have hazard warning lights. B)

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Having removed the timber, and still hoping to do without needing the dashboard supporting H-frame, I've also revised the dashboard layout, switch arrangements and cable runs, so the speedo is now outboard of the rev counter (the rev counter and speedo have swapped places). The minor instruments are in their same position, save of course being mounted onto the steel facia panel from a TR4  (they were previously mounted into the TR4A's wooden dashboard).  A TR4 three-position light switch is on the dashboard to the right of the steering (the light switch used to be the LH column switch). The column switch immediately besides that (also on the RHS)(this used to be the overdrive switch) is now the main / dip beam switch (which used to be foot operated switch next to the clutch pedal). The indicators switch is there too near the steering wheel (when it's refitted).  The overdrive switch is now to the left of the steering column ie adjacent to the gear change (this switch used to be for the lights).

The rheostat for the instrument lamps is yet to be mounted but that will be under the dashboard behind the central switch plinth, together with the fan blower switch, which is presently crudely mounted on a bracket projecting from the heater itself. 

Left to right on the central switch plinth are now ; wipers, screen-wash, heat distribution (face / footwells), then the ignition switch, and finally the choke. The hazard warning light switch is tucked under the RHS of the dashboard and in the bracket that used to be for the bonnet release.  That release cable is now on a separate bracket just under the RHS face vent, which is much very easier to reach. 

 P1410766s.JPG.7f8b46564ce5ed2423f4141e0a79c2a6.JPG  

^ bottom centre  is the bonnet release, which looks odd at such an angle, but in fact is as easy to pull when standing outside the car as it is from inside. The angled cable run is very much more direct and a smoother run than it was originally, so the bonnet pull feels lighter. Similarly swapping the rev. counter and speedo made each of their cable runs smoother. That bracket is mounted onto the bottom of the air vent trunking, and as you can see just above this is the indicator relay.  The ticking relay (for LED lamps) can be better heard than the original Lucas item fitted way up in the corner of the passenger footwell. 

The red switch for the hazard warning lights can be seen in the bottom-left  of this photo.  And the headlamp switch is on the dashboard besides the indicator relay.  The pull-type brake light switch can just about be seen mid-way up the left hand side of the photo.  Naturally the wire run between the fuse box just out of sight in the bottom left corner  and the brake light and hazard warning switches are short & direct. Likewise between the light switch and the main/dip switch.  As again are those between the indicator switch, the relay and the hazard switch.  I've left the steel cover off the cables going up the steering column, and instead used velcro hook n' loop.  So much easier !

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^ As I presently have no bumpers fitted, nor overriders, the rear number plate lights are fitted directly onto the plate. However I'll need to revisit those because the LED  lamps are incorrectly positioned (I simply used the same holes that fastens the plate) and also show too bright a white light at the rear of the car.  As you might see, the first and last letters of the registration are not illuminated.  Oops !  :ph34r: 

Naturally the engine turns on the starter and the coil is wired in, the fuel gauge reads, and the (single) horn sounds penetrating. I haven't turned the engine over more than for half a second because..,  the next round of disappointments were just waiting to present themselves. 

I had hoped to have the car started and to have a short drive this Easter weekend (aside from one seat, the car's interior trim is unnecessary for that) but before I even attempted to start the engine. . .

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^ I'd spotted this last week so as I said, I haven't turned the engine over more than for half a second ..just to check the high-torque starter-motor worked ..since I had it apart, cleaned & lubricated things, and replaced its bearing.

I had drained the water from the radiator and engine, months ago when dealing with the leaky engine block drain tap, and that is how it has remained throughout the winter.  However I fear water must be in the sump..  There was no evidence of steam from the engine breather, nor white smoke from the exhaust, but you may recall when I first bought the car (..a year ago in March) I had issues with rusty water spouting from the radiator cap and expansion bottle.  Re-torquing the cylinder head, fitting a seal on the radiator cap, and extending the pipe into the expansion bottle appeared to have sorted that out, as the frothing had stopped and there were no signs of emulsified oil  under the rocker cover (when I later swapped out the rocker shaft)  ..but now I wonder about the figure-of-eight-gaskets again.   I really didn't need this issue right now, and so it's quite upsetting.

I really need to stop working on this car NOW ..so that i might get on with other jobs which left undone are costing me huge amounts of money each month (ie., a boat that I haven't touched for three years, first because of covid and then I had to move home, and then because of this (..crude expletive ! )  car).

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^ I hadn't ever experienced this sort of thing before, and hoped that it might just be condensation from sitting in a poly-tunnel for the past six months. I've cleaned it all off now with tissue, but in my mind there too much water to suggest it had all come in through the open breather (the rubber pipe has been off for a month or so).

After seeing this, I recalled a tell-tale sign ..which I didn't pick up on at the time. ie., when I last used the car (and was somewhat preoccupied with getting the car's suspension, brakes and steering to feel safer) ..and that was the engine's oil pressure was getting progressively getting worse.  I mentioned to friends in the club that I wanted to drop the sump before I drove the car much further, to check the cranks end-float, and main bearings, and to rebuild the oil pump. At the same time I wanted to lift off the timing chain cover to check it's condition (which is why I had drained the radiator - ready to remove it).  As I say, at the time there was nothing obvious under the rocker's filler cap, nor the dip stick, to suggest what I'm seeing now.

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^ Oil flowing like muddy water, and even frothing !   so., certainly well mixed, despite having not turned the engine over more than a turn or two over the past six months.  Naturally, if this has been in the engine and is the cause of the low oil pressure, then I hate to think what it's done to the engines bearings.  :(

On a positive note, it is encouraging to see how tough these engines must be ..to have survived running on this.  And perhaps with this issue resolved - the oil pressure ought to be much better again ;)

It certainly is a new one on me..  How to ensure the engine runs cool.. simple just half fill the sump with cold water !

.. Happy Easter

 

 

Edited by Bfg
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Panic thee not (yet!)

Many years ago, for reasons that escape me now, I had left an interval of a few months between rebuilding an engine and firing it up. Result, when checking things over, was what you have.

A suggestion from somebody who knew more about these things than me, was to retorque the head down before busting it all apart. I did just that, flushed the mayonnaise out and then ran gently it on cheapo oil, flushing it again between times.

It did the job - the explanation being that the liners had shifted a bit.

Good luck

james

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Have my fingers and toes crossed it’s an easy fix.

Andy

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35 minutes ago, james christie said:

Panic thee not (yet!)

Many years ago, for reasons that escape me now, I had left an interval of a few months between rebuilding an engine and firing it up. Result, when checking things over, was what you have.

A suggestion from somebody who knew more about these things than me, was to retorque the head down before busting it all apart. I did just that, flushed the mayonnaise out and then ran gently it on cheapo oil, flushing it again between times.

It did the job - the explanation being that the liners had shifted a bit.

Good luck

james

+1. On the retorque as a first approach   The figure is in Lbs Feet not Lbs Inches as an apprentice mate of mine tightened his TR4A cylinder head to and screamed when the water leaked.  He did not believe that such a high torque should be used.

 

 

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12 hours ago, james christie said:

Panic thee not (yet!)

Many years ago, for reasons that escape me now, I had left an interval of a few months between rebuilding an engine and firing it up. Result, when checking things over, was what you have.

A suggestion from somebody who knew more about these things than me, was to retorque the head down before busting it all apart. I did just that, flushed the mayonnaise out and then ran gently it on cheapo oil, flushing it again between times.

It did the job - the explanation being that the liners had shifted a bit.

Good luck

james

Apart from your first sentence, that is exactly the plan. 

As to the cause, I have yet to figure this out.

Following a suggestion by Charlie-D  and endorsed by other contributors,  I re-torqued the head (on 15th March last year < here > ), soon after buying the car .. and then the symptoms of condensation inside the rocker cover, as well as the water being blown out of the radiator, went away.  Now, with no head-of-water in the block or radiator and having hardly turned the engine over - I have brown sludge instead of black oil. 

I do not know if it is relevant but the condensation under the rocker cover appears different between then and now. . .

 540397133_TR2021-03-14003s.jpg.d6b5e4618104a9de36722dff3a8d1d92.jpg.962f98868fb72f2daad251b0eea41d12.jpg  P1410778as.jpg.913ce1272b86eb2051ae6e358a21ce78.jpg 

^ Left   is what we had before, where the inside of the cover itself was covered but the rocker arms, etc, were relatively clear of emulsified oil.  Now right ,  it's the other way around with the inside of the rocker cover being clean, but the rocker-gear covered with the sludge and the water droplets quite obvious. Is this a clue ? or is just a reflection of the car had recently been run (in the first photo) and its moisture having been swept into the sump by the oil splash, whereas now the engine hasn't been run and so water droplets sit undisturbed where it condensed.? 

Understanding the cause of a problem is of course important to knowing how to deal with it.  Last year's symptoms of radiator water spurting out of the cap and overflow bottle immediately.. immediately suggested the cylinder-head-gasket was blowing into and excessively pressurising the water jacket. 

However water getting into the sump, and thereafter condensation in the rocker cover is more likely to be ; a hairline crack in the block or head, one or more core plugs seeping,  &/or the figure-of-eight gasket(s) leaking.  The latter appears to be most common with these 4-cylinder TR engines.

Water leaking into the sump would most likely occur when the coolant water is hot and pressurised, but can also happen very slowly, over a long period of time just because of the head-of-water in the radiator.  And as this engine's oil / sludge level hasn't increased over the past six months of standing, I might conclude that this car's particular problem occurs when the engine and rad water is hot (any gaps in the seals of the engine have thermally expanded) and the radiator water is under pressure.  The time Katie's  been standing just confuses the issue, but I don't think it is factor ..other than highlighting the symptoms of a previous issue (ie. water already being in the sump) more obvious. 

Why hadn't the oil level, on the dipstick changed  when running ?  Well one might reason that ; as oil is consumed in running, so the water leaking-in tops the level off.  And although the water level in the radiator stays the same (up to the top) just perhaps the level of water in the overflow bottle was going down.?  I don't recall ..as topping it up wouldn't have rung warning bells. 

Naturally, the problem would be more when the car is repeatedly used for short journeys, such as local trips to the storage-container, and while testing the suspension and steering settings.  Each time the engine and water was hot, and the water under pressure ..but then things were left to cool and condense rather than it being evaporated and expelled through the open breather.

As some readers will recall ; Katie  has a 7 psi radiator cap fitted and, we much discussed, that a 4 psi cap is correct and proven to be sound by the likes of Mike with BrendaKatie's  7-lb cap would exasperate the issue we're seeing, and so that will be swapped out for the 4lb cap.  

In the meantime, I'll re-torque the head again, in the hope that those figure-of-eight gaskets might still seal a little better.  I'll of course the oil and filter, and then run the car to assess whether in due course the head has to come off, and the sleeves out to replace those bottom wet-liner gaskets. 

Hey ho, there's always more to owning a classic car, than shopping for glitzy bits and polishing it.! 

 

As an aside, but in many way just as disappointing is this . . .

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^ the drip tray under the gearbox.  Apparently the seal between the gearbox and overdrive is leaking ..without the car even turning a gear-shaft. 

I've experience a similar issue with my vintage Sunbeam motorcycle's rear drive (..they are shaft-drive bikes), whereby the original specification was for star-lock-washers to be used under the four nuts of the rear bearing cover.  I change those washers to copper washers and the leak is solved.  I'll try doing the same with these overdrive attachment nuts. If it works, it would be a nice n' quick fix .

Onwards and upwards we trudge our way forward. Hope is in the sunshine !

Pete 

         

 

Edited by Bfg
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Gearbox to overdrive leak is common as the adaptor plates do warp and or crack, common fault.

Stuart.

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Cheers Stuart.  Is the adapter plate part of the O/D or gearbox.?  I ask because, the overdrive was an exchange unit from Cox's and the gearbox never dripped like this before. How does it get warped or cracked, is that due to ham-fisted mating of the two ?   And.. is another issue possibly causing the leak, and if what might be and can I fix it myself ? 

Thank you,

Pete   

 

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29 minutes ago, Bfg said:

Cheers Stuart.  Is the adapter plate part of the O/D or gearbox.?  I ask because, the overdrive was an exchange unit from Cox's and the gearbox never dripped like this before. How does it get warped or cracked, is that due to ham-fisted mating of the two ?   And.. is another issue possibly causing the leak, and if what might be and can I fix it myself ? 

Thank you,

Pete   

 

The adaptor plate is a separate item the bolts to the gearbox internally and the overdrive fits to it with external fixings.  Yes the plates get bent or cracked if the overdrive inners are not properly aligned along the Mainshaft of the gearbox.   Best way to be sure if a spare mainshaft is not to hand would be fit the gearbox to the overdrive without the 8 springs installed.   The gearbox should just slide on.   If that is ok fit springs and pump cam and re assemble.  Remember to tie the pump plunger back until it is on the cam.

PS hold the overdrive in the vice and lower the gearbox onto it.   do not turn the output flange once the sliding fit is achieved.

Edited by BlueTR3A-5EKT
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Unless its a new plate then a lot are slightly warped or cracked in service. I was lucky to pick up an NOS one along with a new mainshaft quite a few years ago that is being used to convert my original gearbox from my 4a as its been running a loaned TR6 box for the last 12 yrs at least, The gaskets that go either side of them are very flimsy hence the leaks unless the plate is dead flat. Its a strip job to fix leaks as overtightening the bolts can make it worse. 

Stuart.

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Thanks Gents, It sounds as if I shall have to live with the car dripping oil, at least for the foreseeable, as I really don't want to be working on this car for another 12 months. 

My advice to anyone who's gearbox half-shaft bearing is slightly noisy (whirring) is to save yourself a thousand pounds and live with it. This gearbox rebuild and then (seemingly only because the gearbox then leaked) the overdrive replacement has been more trouble than it's worth.    

Again my emotions say that this car ought to be sold cheaply or burnt to the ground.  I'm weary of this saga.  

   

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2 minutes ago, Bfg said:

Thanks Gents, It sounds as if I shall have to live with the car dripping oil, at least for the foreseeable, as I really don't want to be working on this car for another 12 months. 

My advice to anyone who's gearbox half-shaft bearing is slightly noisy (whirring) is to save yourself a thousand pounds and live with it. This gearbox rebuild and then (seemingly only because the gearbox then leaked) the overdrive replacement has been more trouble than it's worth.    

Again my emotions say that this car ought to be sold cheaply or burnt to the ground.  I'm weary of this saga.  

   

The problem with ignoring the layshaft noise is it does more damage the longer you leave it Im afraid.

Stuart.

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Pete do you not have a fully rebuilt engine that you started off with which you featured in your early posts that you could fit ???

Roy

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Hi Roy, Unfortunately that spare engine was not rebuilt because I was dubious about the machining work done (and the fact they reground the main bearings when they weren't meant to and I already had bearing to fit standard). Anyway I was going to take the parts across to another machine shop, just for them to check things, and hopefully for them to tell me I was a prat and all was well, but then covid (you remember that ?) closed us all down. The 2nd machine shop that I booked the parts in to, to have them checked refused to take any work in.   And then I was forced to move house, and that engine was put into the storage container, carefully packed so that bits didn't get lost nor mixed up with my Sunbeam motorcycle bits. And there it remains.

Hey ho !

 

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I've take a couple of days off, not least to overcome my upset with the gearbox rebuilt / leak fiasco, and while my neighbours were on holiday took the opportunity for several long nights of sleep (normally I'm woken around 5:45am each morning.

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^ I also took the time to clean up the workspace of wiring and other 'stuff' ..and to restore it to something like a home patio again, albeit still within a polytunnel.

Getting back to work ..with a more positive mindset . . .

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^ the oil filter as removed.  I'm not sure this is quite as Triumph quite envisaged it to have fitted.  

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^ Bob (the prior-owner) must have bee strapped for time &/or money to have reassembled it with such a bottom washer.  The top washer 'A' is also absent. I wonder if it is needed when the replacement filters have a metal cap on each end ?  Perhaps someone might advise.

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^ Yesterday I dropped the sump, which was not an easy task because it had been glued on.  A lump hammer and block of wood at one of the few places I could get in (besides the distributor) buckled the flange enough for me to then get a chisel in and prise the darned thing off.  Yes, it really took that much effort to get the glue to release its grip.  I left it to drain overnight, and this morning cleaned it out.

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^ Does no-one every take the sump off to clean it out once in a while.?  The water contamination has evaporated so this, now black gunge, is just a reflection of owner-neglect.

This afternoon, I re-torqued the head, as recommended by Mickey slackening the nuts off to break their bind before resetting them in sequence at 105 ft.lb.

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^ After re-torquing the paint marks I'd added, at the corner of each nut, reflected that some had returned to where they were while others pinch up a little more. 

Recalling the advice from RobH, from back in March last year < here > to check that core plug (seen in the top left of this photo), which I poked around at with wire but found no penetration, and was otherwise advised to leave it alone. I checked it again today and lo n' behold a very-fine but stiff wire (from one of the rotary wire brushes) did ..poke through. 

Last year I'd heeded the head's up and ordered a new core plug ..just in case, and today I discovered I needed it.  Thanks Rob B)   And I do actually mean THANK YOU  ..because that may well be the present cause of the moisture in the rocker cover and the oil's contamination.  And this problem offers a much happier fix than my having to remove the cylinder head and wet-liners to swap out their figure-of-eight bottom gaskets.  

I think originally the issue was mainly  with the head gasket (never re-torqued since being fitted) blowing into the water jacket, with symptoms of radiator water frothing and overflowing from the radiator's cap and expansion bottle.  But despite my not finding a perforation through this core plug at the time (with thicker wire if I recall correctly) I'd guess it was there.

So then how to get a flush fitted soft aluminium core-plug out of the top of the cylinder head ?  Well again thanks to this forum and in particular to topics posted by Brian Eldred and contributors to that  < here > I had some clues . . .

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^ after putting a number of barriers between the core plug and the pushrod tubes, to contain any debris,  I drilled a couple of holes (..with vacuum cleaner sucking away at full blast) and inserted an old pair of long nose pliers as pins to try and unwind the core plug with.   It didn't work !

P1410847s.JPG.b0d399caf9cbc96933e1894ab1ab3390.JPG 

I tried alternative pins (from furniture castors) and a six point socket  ..which was a dismal failure :ph34r:

And so as recommended - I resorted to the crude but effective . . .

P1410848s.JPG.2f57249370118eb4b4bed46c81734715.JPG   P1410852s.JPG.35fc62f4c89d1c3c82f71cad79a87fa3.JPG

I drilled a third hole and broke through to the first two and then used a screwdriver to rip one half out. The other half came quietly and you can see (above right) what remained of its thickness, compared with a new one.

I've tried cleaning the thread into the block out but so far to no avail . . .

P1410853s.JPG.4fe88f76e4cc51036941ac257c2cbc6e.JPG   P1410855s.JPG.c20b0cca6ca435c17ab18016471554f0.JPG

^ The tapped hole is 1" diameter, but even with my smallest rotary brush I cannot get the thread clean and straight enough for a soft aluminium core plug to screw in.  The screwdriver slot I cut in the top is not robust enough to take the torque.  

Tomorrow I go out to get a bolt, or piece of steel pipe, or a tap to redress it.  Confirmed by Revington, as stated by Brian "For info the thread is 1" UNF 12 tpi "  Thank you Brain - that'll be useful to know, even though I'll have the new core plug with me to compare with.  

Onwards and upwards then ..tomorrow.

Pete

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Pete,

I'm sure you did feel the same seeing that oil filter as i did when i checked the brake master cylinder on my "perfectly maintained car".  this was supposed to have been checked by the dealer and the MOT guys....

I will never understand how on earth someone can refit such a filter and glue the sump thinking it is going to be all right....

I hope the plug will be fixed soon and that this and re-torking the head will cure your contamination issue.

All the best,

Laurent

All Photos - 1 of 1 (1).jpeg

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Thanks Laurent

..of course neither the dealer nor the MOT inspector would pull the rubber dust cap off a master cylinder (although that does look like the clutch slave cylinder in the piccie) to see such ..whatever it is.!

And I'm sure the filter looked new before he fitted it :lol:  

Katie's  sump has a stud missing (central at the back) which I've yet to check to see if the thread is stripped out. I suspect it is and it will be a bear to get in to fix ..with the bottom of the bell-housing so close and low, which is why a prior-owner thought to glued it on.  :(

I guess the answer to

10 minutes ago, Lo100469 said:

I will never understand how on earth someone can refit such a filter and glue the sump thinking it is going to be all right....

Is that - it has been OK for while he owned the car.!   And he sold it because he didn't want to deal with these and the other issues of his that'll-do.   Caveat emptor 

Pete

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18 hours ago, Bfg said:

 

P1410848s.JPG.2f57249370118eb4b4bed46c81734715.JPG   P1410852s.JPG.35fc62f4c89d1c3c82f71cad79a87fa3.JPG

I drilled a third hole and broke through to the first two and then used a screwdriver to rip one half out. The other half came quietly and you can see (above right) what remained of its thickness, compared with a new one.

I've tried cleaning the thread into the block out but so far to no avail . . .

P1410853s.JPG.4fe88f76e4cc51036941ac257c2cbc6e.JPG   P1410855s.JPG.c20b0cca6ca435c17ab18016471554f0.JPG

^ The tapped hole is 1" diameter, but even with my smallest rotary brush I cannot get the thread clean and straight enough for a soft aluminium core plug to screw in.  The screwdriver slot I cut in the top is not robust enough to take the torque.  

Tomorrow I go out to get a bolt, or piece of steel pipe, or a tap to redress it.  Confirmed by Revington, as stated by Brian "For info the thread is 1" UNF 12 tpi "  Thank you Brain - that'll be useful to know, even though I'll have the new core plug with me to compare with.  

WRONG .. up n' down the garden path, or in my case back and forth to the ever patient Suffolk Fasteners < facebook here >   Unit 38, Boss Hall ind Est, Ipswich, Suffolk, IP1 5BN, and I've got a bolt which fits . . .

P1410857s.JPG.85e6e13f54a73b6f3b5065be3c56ad16.JPG

^ Naturally this will need to be cut a little shorter !  ..but the important thing is that the thread fits the TR4 (..as I believe this exchanged for unleaded  cylinder head is). And this bolt's thread is 1" x 14 tpi  ..and not the 1" x 12 tpi  of the core plug supplied. 

Although Brian also has a TR4A, the engine he was working on is a TR2, ..so presumably the specification of these core plugs changed inbetween times.

I will chop this bolt to 1/2" in length and use that as the core plug.  Btw it cost £4  and has enough thread to make three core plugs from, which are not prone to corrode in just 55 years !   

Pete

 

 

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P1410858s.JPG.9607f4b77c66777551b700a176ed3523.JPG

^ I've chop this bolt's thread to 1/2" in length and am using that as the core plug. 

Btw it cost £4  from Suffolk Fasteners, Ipswich (who also mail-order fasteners out) ..and it has enough thread to make three or four core plugs from,  or if the threaded hole in the head is difficult to clean out, then simply a hacksaw vertical slot in the side of this bolt ..to use it as tap to clean out the oxidised aluminium very easily.

 

P1410859.JPG.0afb93211ee6d45c69e08f5f1536ec53.JPG

^ new core plug in and sealed.  Hopefully the engine's compression & oil will stay out of the coolant now, and the coolant will stay out of the rocker cover and sump !   

Since this photo the rocker shaft, heater valve and rocker cover have been refitted, so very encouraging progress today. B)

Next I'll be down under the car to check the sump's threads (as one bolt was missing).

Pete

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16 minutes ago, Bfg said:

 

Next I'll be down under the car to check the sump's threads (as one bolt was missing).

 

I hope it's just missing, not broken or stripped...

Pete

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Got to admire your persistence Pete and hope it cures the issue for you.

Sump wise if you can't get in to re-tap the thread and if the "glue" held up why not do the same? Not ideal I know but got to be better than pulling the engine.

Probably a naff idea knowing near nothing regarding a TR4 and thinking aloud would it be possible the remove the bell housing bolts and split the engine and box just enough to get a tap in? You could use threaded rod to keep the alignment and support the box

Andy

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29 minutes ago, PodOne said:

would it be possible the remove the bell housing bolts and split the engine and box just enough to get a tap in?

No need for that.  if there's room for the wrench on the nut, a long-reach tap- wrench like this should also fit

tpw.jpg.279e488576519e3688d1f40a90091943.jpg

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