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Pete - keep up the good work and keep keeping us posted.

Couple of things:

1. That exhaust manifold is a TR4 or late TR3 one,  not a 4A one - a 4A one looks like the one in the photo below - This is spare if you want one.

2. That end exhaust stud can go right through the cylinder head casting and screw into the adjacent  head stud, thereby stopping the head from lifting off - if the head moves up, fine, if it doesn't, then consider taking the exhaust stud out! 

Cheers Rich

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Edited by rcreweread
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Pete - DON'T give up with owning a TR - there are other cars out there - just put the word out on here and elsewhere and I'm sure something will come up Chin up  Cheers Rich

Or these people? http://www.leacyclassics.com/parts/classicmini/engine-components/2k7440.html Roger

. Carrying on from TR4 -v- Tr4A engine, and my purchasing a 'spare'  < here >  ..so that I might get on and have an engine ready by the time the Chance is actually bought and shipped,  we h

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13 hours ago, rcreweread said:

Pete - keep up the good work and keep keeping us posted.

Couple of things:

1. That exhaust manifold is a TR4 or late TR3 one,  not a 4A one - a 4A one looks like the one in the photo below - This is spare if you want one.

2. That end exhaust stud can go right through the cylinder head casting and screw into the adjacent  head stud, thereby stopping the head from lifting off - if the head moves up, fine, if it doesn't, then consider taking the exhaust stud out! 

Cheers Rich

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The twin down-pipes is what I expected.  Indeed I've just emailed you about it.  That manifold design is rather nice.  It's rather disappointing I got the wrong one.  I'll talk to you about your this evening. Thanks.     

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12 hours ago, brenda said:

Evening Pete I am enjoying you work your doing on your engine and all the info you are putting in your posting this will be a good reference for others, keep up the good work. Carole also says hi.

Mike.

Hi Mike, Hi Carole hope you are well and keeping warm.   I always enjoy seeing your car in " Where did you drive to with your TR today "  keep 'em coming..  You use your car as I would like to !  (..save I won't be polishing mine  nearly as often :P)   so that thread and all who contribute to it provide a welcome shot of motivation. Thanks. 

Please PM me if I get to the point of boring you all with too many details.  I know many of you who frequently contribute to these forums have seen it all before, but I'm sure there are others who haven't and like myself are a newbie to the TR.   We are of course open to alternative methods being suggested too.  I'm an old bear but could do with a kid to tell me how to use a phone.!   And then I welcome wisdoms like Rich's ..advising I got the wrong manifold. I wonder if that sits well with the 4A inlet manifold ?   So., all p&p (proactive & positive) contributions are welcome. B)

Thanks.  Pete.

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I managed to steal another couple of hours away ..into the garage this afternoon.  It was chilly cool but a little more progress was made  ..and that was even in the right direction !

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^ I started off with wrestling with the last, rearmost manifold stud.  It was *rather* tight !  I had been forewarned this stud goes through to collide with the rear RH cyl.head stud (the one which is missing) ..so anticipated its thread would be damaged inside.  I was not disappointed, but with the cyl.head stud out the way I managed to free the exhaust stud by going inwards. I'm sure the big hammer helped rattle any rust on the threads too !   Thereafter it was a matter of carefully back and forth reshaping its damaged thread (inside the cylinder head stud hole) back into its tapped hole.  It took a time but we won. 

Very kindly the seller of the engine gave me a cylinder head stud, so after cleaning out it's hole of crud - I then proceeded to fit that. .

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^ fitting the cylinder head stud took a fair amount of back n' forthing to clean out and reshape the threads, but again - Success. 

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^ It's starting to look like a complete engine.   Tbh.,  This engine is built like the Forth Road Bridge, there's nothing lightweight, sporting or finite engineered about its construction. 

I happened to find the 7/16" Whitworth studs are much the same size as used on my 1950's Sunbeam motorcycles (where they are used as cylinder head bolts !). These are a tad too long in their threads so I'll have to trim them off to suit, but I reckon even used Sunbeam ones would be fine to simply hold the manifolds on with.   

And the other end had 7/16" BSF threads so that'll be odd, because the Triumph appears to generally use UNF threads.    Ding !  that triggers a thought..  If I recall (some ?) Whitworth sizes correspond to UNC threads.  So perhaps that's what the Triumph holes are tapped for., UNC to go with their UNF ?

^^ I also found a screw adapter to go into the water heater hole in the block.  Funny things I keep over the years.  No idea where it came from but it may have been off the TR4 I part restored in the early 90's.  It doesn't do anything but raise the hole from the block to 2" above it, but it looks more complete.  More importantly it tells me the exact tapered thread size for when I go shopping for the correct fitting.

 

Moving on .. to the other side of the engine. .

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^ Oil filter removed, and the clutch slave cylinder tie bar, and to drain the black crude oil.

That square-head drain plug had me wondering because it's a 7/16" size spanner and it wasn't going to shift without chewing things up (both the jaws on a lightweight spanner and the square peg).  So instead I used my biggest adjustable spanner (which has wide jaws) and hammered that on as an interference fit and then with a two-foot extension bar ..and at the same time hammering onto the end of the square peg,  it came loose surprisingly easily (and undamaged).  So more success.  This is becoming a nice habit. !

Pete.

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Hi Pete,

go on to report, please, and let me tell you this story:

a friend of mine had hudge problems with the manifold studs on his Alfa Romeo:

he riped off the first one, later the second, did not stop to remove them all from the head  and the other end of the manifolds - without any real need, as he finally resumed!

Finally every second was riped off!

Cost him a lot of effort to make a tool to drill them out and cut all threads new.

So if not urgently needed - I would not touch them.

Just a different idea.....

Ciao, Marco

 

 

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Thank You Marco.  I would generally agree with you.  I know someone who restores Sunbeam motorcycles, and one of things he does is to remove and replace all the studs in an engine. every one of them.  This not only cost the customer a lot (..his time),  but also taking out studs which are in good shape damages the cast aluminium they are screwed into.  Also he takes those studs out before the engine is cleaned, so those holes get full of crud. Then he spends hours cleaning those threads out again.!

There are however a few cylinder-head bolts which I torque-up before dismantling those engines. This is because they are well known for stripping their thread out of the aluminium.  So to correctly tighten these before dismantling helps me identify those that might later fail, as the head is re-torqued after the engine is run and heat cycled. 

I will only take out those studs which are necessary for machining operations or to redress a gasket face,  have been damaged (even the last one of these manifold studs already had deep marks into it from vice-grips), or else stretched.   If it is not broken it is (often) not necessary to fix it. B)

 

3 hours ago, Z320 said:

Cost him a lot of effort to make a tool to drill them out and cut all threads new.

I don't know what tool he had to make.?  I just used a cordless and drill bits, plus the tap.

Pete. 

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13 hours ago, Bfg said:

^ It's starting to look like a complete engine.   Tbh.,  This engine is built like the Forth Road Bridge, there's nothing lightweight, sporting or finite engineered about its construction. 

 

Can't argue with the comment about TR engines being built like the Forth Road Bridge.  A world of difference from a modern one.

When I rebuilt my engine I removed all ths studs and when I replaced them I gave them a smear of copper grease in an attempt to make them removeable in the future.

Incidentally, is there a reason why threads into cast iron are generally UNC?  Are they more robust?

Rgds Ian

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2 hours ago, Bfg said:

I don't know what tool he had to make.?  I just used a cordless and drill bits, plus the tap.

Pete. 

With the head still on the engine in the engine bay

he made a drill machine holder / guide to drill ans tap 100% upright.

We discussed something like that currently...   

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1 hour ago, Ian Vincent said:

 is there a reason why threads into cast iron are generally UNC?  Are they more robust?
 

Cast metals whether iron, aluminium, bass, bronze, etc.,  are all brittle and perhaps a little porous.  Brittle materials don't distort (ductility) or stretch (elasticity) as much ..and so when locally loaded they crack.  In a tapped hole this is seen as the thread stripping, whereas in metallurgical terms each thread has cracked and sheared off.  So a coarse thread such as UNC or Whitworth, similarly coarse metric and BS or BA sizes,  simply makes the root of each thread thicker and therefore stronger  ..versus a fine thread such as UNF.

NB. The bolts or studs going into the casting can be very strong (ductile) - so it's the thread in the casting which can shear and pull out.  Indeed because the studs are over sized / overly strong they need not be made from so tough a steel.  This was evident when I drilled out the sheared manifold studs and then re-tapped the holes. The softer metal of the stud cut out relatively easily, and the tap was guided by the harder / more brittle metal of the cast iron.  Of course that wouldn't apply with cast aluminium, brass, bronze, etc., where even low-grade steel is harder than those soft metals of the castings.    

Unfortunately any chink, nick, or pitting in a cast piece localises stresses and when it's hit or twisted - the part tends to crack from that (previously unnoticed) chink. They are just like perforations on plastic packaging ..designed to make the package easier to open.  And castings have a rough pitted surface and may also be porous, which is why so many manifolds get broken. 

Bead blasting cast parts closes this pitting up and rounds the corners ..and this is like rounding off a perforation.  By minimising those chinks / nicks / sharp corners (focus for stress propagation) it makes the part more resilient to cracking and failure. Conversely sharp sand blasting does the opposite.

As an aside ;  BS Whitworth and UNC have the same pitch (seemingly aside from 1/2" size) but the threads on the former are cut to a 55 degree angle, whereas the UNC are cut to 60 degrees.  So the sizes fit together but if you were to use the wrong cut of stud, then face of the threads wouldn't sit flat to the face of the threads in the tapped hole.  Ok for low stress jobs but not so good for things which are torqued down a lot.  Naturally if mismatched thread cuts are used - they would be more likely to seize in.   

Pete.

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parcels arrived ..early Christmas an all

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^ Tuesday, a day or two earlier than expected from HandyStraps..   

I'll mount that onto a plate with an eye on it's end, and I'll pull the side cover off to grease the gears before use. . then I'll see if it it works hanging from the roof beam in my garage.

And then Wednesday. .

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^  The engine stand, half a day later than the "48 hour delivery" might have implied, but still within reason.  

I looked on line to see how to attach an engine to one of these, as I'd never done this before.  And then took myself off to Suffolk Fasteners to buy an assortment of bolts I might need.  I had to guesstimate the length I'd need,  so we'll see if what I have will do. 

Nice toys ! 

 

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Yesterday was not so productive, in terms getting on with the engine itself, but I did get the winch set up and also a first arrangement of the engine stand. .

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I removed the covers off the winch and greases the gears inside. As expected they were bone dry.  And I drilled a piece of flat bar which I through-bolted to the base of the winch. This is plenty long enough for the handle to turn, however with the weight of this lump it bends so I think I'll make another from a more robust length of steel.   

The hook on the winch's strap I clipped onto the rope I have around the garage roof beam ..so the winch goes up n' down with the engine. This means that they are always in close reach of each other.  The garage roof beams are 5-1/2" x 3" timber, but as this engine lift is midway to its span - I cut a 3" x 3" timber prop to place under it.  I don't know how much the beam would have bowed under that sort of weight but I had left 1/8" between the end of the prop and the beam ..and when the engine was lifted - that prop was in tight.  

I tentatively lifted the engine, just taking the weight ..with the motorcycle lift still under it.  Then lowered it and adjusted the position of strop attached to the engine to better adjust to its centre of gravity (so the engine lifted up squarely.  The winch's inside ratchet clicks as it goes up, and holds that engine's position without the need to activate a locking latch.  Turn the handle the other way and it slowly comes down again.  I don't know how it works because there's no ratchet lever to release ..but it does work.  I tried again and decided to relocate the wire strop, where I had fastened it to the bellhousing end of the engine. I used a block of wood to hold the wire away from the cylinder head.  Setting these things up for the first time takes a fair amount of fiddling around ..but hopefully will be easily / quickly repeatable next time it's used.

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^ Fraction of inch at a time I tested it, up and down, allowing the winches strap to slip tight around its drum. I left it for a while (as I was greasing the castors and assembling the engine stand) just to check that the winch wasn't slowly loosening on its own.  It wasn't.   In time and after a few more lifts and lowerings,  I felt a little more confident and so removed the transport pallet out of the way.  Success.!

 

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With the castors greased the engine stand was then assembled. I must admit I'm pleased with the apparent quality of this very inexpensive  stand.   There are x3 through-bolts at the upright to base joint,  but only one of those secures the socketed forward extension to the castored wheels ..so I reckon (when the stand is not being used) I could pull that out and then the two parts will lay flat for storage.  

I checked the rotisserie spindle in the tube, as I'd read that sometimes there can be a burr from the holes being drilled. These were fine, and the holes locking pin holes aligned, so I greased the spindle and its tube.

I had looked on-line how these stands are usually attached to the engine around the gearbox mounting flange.  But surely that would make turning the engine over (crank, pistons, etc) really difficult ?  I'd like to get to that end of the engine to turn the crank via its flywheel ..or at least its fixing bolts.  I also seemed to recall reading that with the stand mounted on that end makes removing the rear main-bearing awkward, and sometimes impossible. 

I had seen on an American website and here on the TR forum where engines had been mounted from their side. That made more sense to me, not least because the engine's weight (frightfully massive to me !) is  lesser cantilevered so far out from the stand.   The LH side of the 4-cyl engine is lumpy.  It has a ridge for the camshaft half way down the block and a sizeable lump of casting poking out where the distributor is fitted.  Where the oil filter and the petrol pump were fixed would provide good places to bolt the stand to, but there is nowhere below this and the only place above them were the two small holes intended just to mount the ignition coil.  The engine's weight partly hanging on such a small fastening might be theoretically plausible ..but to me would be a worry.       

Ok I thought - the RHS of the engine then.  That's reasonably flat, but is of limited use ..if the cylinder head needs to be removed ..because the stand's top fixing brackets go onto where the manifolds bolt. That side's lower fastenings are where the dynamo bracket fit at the front, and the drain tap for the water jacket at the rear. These  have a decent size boss so also ought to be plenty strong enough.  So with four good places to bolt to - it's where I chose to do it.   There is another issue though.. if one wishes to spin the engine over, because (..on this stand) the turning one way - the starter motor mounting would interfere with the stand's upright leg.  And turning the other way - the front the engine mount plate likewise sticks out. 

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^ taking the engine's weight for the first time. The stand's upright leg is just 1/2" clear of the sump flange, so the engine's weight is least cantilevered. 

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^ This stand feels very sturdy with the engine on it, and the balance point I chose is (so far) good.  However the engine can only be rotated this to angle in either direction before the stand's leg fouls the engine mounting plate or the starter motor housing.  It needs to go out 3" (75mm) or thereabouts to clear.  The rotisserie spindle is 6-3/8" long (160mm) so with it pulled out to clear the front engine mount, there would still be 3-3/8" (85mm) of the spindle in the tube.  I won't need to fully rotate the engine very often, so later today I'll see if doing this, with the winch as a security line, is (safely) feasible.  

Hey, I can always reattach the stand elsewhere if it doesn't work out, or if I wish to remove the cylinder head.   But in the meantime, this position gives me good access to turn the crankshaft, the front end of the engine including the cam-chain cover, and of course the rockers and the LHS of the engine (distributor, oil filter, fuel pump, etc.).  The sump can be dropped ..and at 45 degrees either way - I'll have reasonably decent access under the engine.  It seems that wherever these stands are mounted will be a compromise to something.

As I say I've never used one of these engine stands before, and I find the weight of this cast iron engine rather intimidating, so I'll take things at my own slow pace as I learn. 

Pete.

p.s. the flywheel supplied with the engine is the wrong one. Its pcd is 2-1/4" and the flywheel mounting appears to be 3-1/4".  I've called the seller and he'll check what's what and let me know.

 

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Shaky arrangement. This is the way it should be, no compromise. If you need to rotate the engine more than 90* make sure you use an hollow bar as an extension to the supplied bar or else you'll be painfully reminded Newton's laws of motion. And wear safety shoes...

 

IMG_4720.jpg

Edited by Geko
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Please don't take my question not that serious, 

but seriously - did you remove the paint from the surfaces where you bolt the manifolds on?

No critic, just a question for my interest.

Ciao, Marco

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1 hour ago, Geko said:

Shaky arrangement. This is the way it should be, no compromise. If you need to rotate the engine more than 90* make sure you use an hollow bar as an extension to the supplied bar or else you'll be painfully reminded Newton's laws of motion. And wear safety shoes...

 

IMG_4720.jpg

+1 Steff.....it all looks very wrong but with High Tensile Bolt’s all is happy and safe!

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While you are taking the studs out, do check the head studs, especially those at the four corners of the block....I can’t remember which one, but there is one that is notorious for cracking and needs repairing whilst you are in there.

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a little more this afternoon. Starting with spinning the prop  ..oh OK.,  the engine.

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^ with the winch slid back along the strop rearward - Take the weight of the engine on the winch. Pull the spindle part way out of the stand (..it's still in the tube by over 3",  but I have a scaffolding pole in there just in case the winch should fail).

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^ lift it a little higher ..so the stand is lifted, a couple of inches off the floor, and rotate the stand under and passed the front engine mount bracket. Stuff a rag in there to prevent it scratching the stand.  And then gently lower the winch.

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^ with the engine hanging front end down - push the spindle back into the tube. And lower the winch.  It's simple but a little nerve wracking first time around and with equipment I don't yet trust. 

I didn't rotate the engine further than this ..because the sump, although drained of oil, has not been cleaned out of its sludge.  And I didn't want that gunge up inside the block.  However at the moment I cannot see why it shouldn't now fully invert - on the stand.

Turning the engine back upright is the same operation ..in reverse.

It worked fine but I think I'll extend the length of this (60mm dia.) spindle another 50mm in length ..and add a couple of safety pins. Then it will just be a matter of sliding the spindle outwards along its tube, turning the engine, and then pushing the spindle back into the tube again (ie. normal position).   

Although I can't remove the cylinder-head with the engine-stand mounted onto its side ..all in all - I'm so far happy with this configuration,  not least because the engine is nicely balanced & easy to rotate by hand ..rather than being (dangerously ?) top heavy.  I've not needed the handle provided.

 

Now back to work .

When the engine was on end I took the opportunity to just slightly loosened all the sump bolts.  So then, with the engine back upright on its stand, but canted to 45 degrees . . .

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^ bolts out and straight into a jar of old petrol ..to clean them.

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I reckon that reddish colour is the penetrating fluid I put into the bores. It's leaked passed the piston rings. 

Otherwise yuk in the bottom of the pan. Black sludge with white metal by the look of it.  BUT., there are no nasty hard chunks !   Yippee !

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^ a pair of disposable plastic gloves, half an hour with a scraper to get out the heavier deposits, 1/2 pint of old petrol,  a dozen paper towels ..and both inside and out is clean enough to handle . 

That's the progress I wanted to make.  And I'm really chuffed there's no nasty surprises (no big bits) in the sump.  

I also replaced the link from the winch to the lifting strop with a piece of 6 x 50mm flat bar.  So all in all ..a good afternoon's work.

Pete

 

Edit.. for the sake of providing a more complete picture of this procedure.,  below is my reply to another thread < here >,  where a relatively-new-to-mechanics member is looking for the first time at a TR4A engine which is locked up from standing, and in his case also rusty inside. .

 

Mark,  Hopefully you haven't discarded that gloop in the sump yet.  The reason I say this because it can be like archeology to teach us what has happened before.  I let mine stand for a while (at a tilt) and then drain off most of it ..and to the rest I add a thinning agent (usually old / stale petrol) or something similarly cheap.  I mix that in, and again let it stand before draining off the excess.  Once the worse of the gloopy has gone into an old oil can (for responsible disposal),  I'll thin it down again and then run a magnet through ..to pan for metal bits, like swarf, the odd nut or washer, or perhaps a split-pin or broken bit of chain or sprocket tooth.  This is trawling / panning for information can lead to spotting possible issues ..that I might otherwise not have been on the lookout for. 

Looking both outside and inside (either from the top or bottom) of the engine..  I'm looking for any nut or bolt that doesn't look like it was made in the 1960's.  Note if any have been damaged or rounded off at all - indicating an amateur has been there with poorly fitting tools.  And check to see where washers are, and what type they are (split locking washers, flat washers, thick washers, copper or fibre washers, etc).   I also feel how much movement and twist there is each of the bearings ..as a first impression to getting to know this particular engine and to determine how much wear there is.   For example, I knew before I removed the big end caps that the shells were shot, and therefore most likely the bearing's journals were too. I recorded the torque needed to undo the important bolts (like the big end caps and the main bearings). Again I was gaining a 'feel' for the engine, and then comparing the figures recorded with those in the workshop manual I gauged how well the engine had be put together ..and therefore if I might trust anything the previous owner did.

Have a good look also around the outside of the engine for signs of oil &/or water leak.   To me the black gloop in your sump says that there was no water inside the engine, but the cleanliness of the castings suggests it's not long since being (part) rebuilt.  It may have been rebuilt but leaked like a sieve (signs of leaking outside / under the engine &/or around the gearbox) and so was never used.  Conversely it could be that the engine was rebuilt and the gearbox or something in the drive train was trash and too expensive to repair ..so the owner gave up on the whole car.  So he'd got it running but perhaps for just a mile or two, perhaps never even turning a wheel at all.!   You'll probably not know for sure ..but it's something to consider, because if that had been the case and then the car left standing in North East US freezing weather then come the thaw - heavy condensation would in fact give you exactly that sort of undisturbed loose rust and aluminium corrosion inside the rocker cover and over metal parts that the oil has run off.  With the tyres shredded from being pulled out of its barn and onto a trailer - I'm guessing the clutch is or was seriously corroded on, or else transmission or drive / axle or brakes are (or were) locked tight.  

Similarly, I look closely at every gasket to see if it had been reused and also what sealant has been used.  I cannot trust any engine that has been put together with globs of silicon gasket sealer.  In short, you'll be wise to take your time ..to learn to read the signs at every single stage of dismantling, whether ancillaries or the engine itself.   Seriously, this is like reading a trail when tracking an animal ..the marks that you see along the way tell you where to look at next and what to look for. It does take a time to learn these things, and then most experienced engine re-builders do it subconsciously.  For my 'lump' ..there was every indication that the engine had never been apart, but that the water pump have been replaced and the timing cover might also have been removed at some time.  I would gauge my engine is of relatively low mileage, but after the original running-in service schedule it had rarely, if ever, had an oil change.

Judging by the photos you shared - the aluminium of the pistons has furred up / oxidated and I would guess that has locked up between the piston and the cylinder (there was only 0.004" (four thousands of an inch) between the piston's skirt and the iron cylinder bore when it was fitted.  However, spraying up around each the cylinder and piston skirt with thin penetrating oil will help loosen things.    

Btw the fan on your engine is secured by four (1/2" headed ?) bolts which ought to be locked in place by a single tab washer plate (which also locks the big central bolt from undoing). Once the tabs are tapped flat and the four bolts are removed - then the fan itself lifts off.  And then the big headed bolt holding the fan extension and pulley is accessible.  

However, before you seriously try to undo it..  it's quite possible that you can use this bolt to turn the crankshaft back and forth. (Remember ;  clockwise tightens, anti-clockwise loosens 99.9% of all bolts, nuts and screws).  Initially it may only move 1/4 of a millimeter one way and then the same back.  Back and forth a few dozen times and you might begin to see the movement. Persevere and in time you ought to get more..   Oh do take the car out of gear before you try doing this and if your clutch feels like it's working then you might also block / wedge that all the way down to the floor.

If I recall correctly,  I used a 30mm (1-1/8") open end spanner to undo that central fan extension / pulley bolt.  That's not a size of spanner found in most tool kits, but my dad (ex-RAF) had filed a old 1" spanner to that size,  so I didn't have to go out and buy one. They're supposed to be humongously tight but mine ..with this spanner and a 4ft length of scaffolding pole had no problem at all.

Hope that helps,

Pete.

Edited by Bfg
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Hi Pete,

put a straight bar of steel or a lineal over the drills.

Does it lay flat or are the drills "punched". This happens when the bolts have been tighten too strong.

How does the seal paper looks like?!? Is it broken in pieces? Looks like this with the seal on the engine. Same issue - bolts too tight, drills punched.

Edited by Z320
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^

I'm guessing you're talking about the sump pan, where over-tight bolts pull it out of shape.  Thankfully this one is in really good shape with minimal distortion, and certainly nothing that would dress out with a hammer and dolly.  The paper gasket tore as I dropped the sump.  I don't know what sealant was used on it but I'm glad to report there's no evidence of that horrid silicon stuff. :)

 

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Ok, first thing first.  Let's change things !

P1330025s.thumb.jpg.a0f08eed581adbec18244e1f9fb789b6.jpg

^ My landlord had a scrap piece of 60mm dia steel tube, and kindly cut off a 60mm length for my needs. I cleaned it up (heavy build up of paints over rust) and welded it as an extension to the engine stand's rotisserie spindle. 

P1330028s.thumb.jpg.9df005800dd5bab7c8272bb9e70251ac.jpg

^ now with the weld finished flat and the spindle greased - the engine can be pulled a little way out of the socket so its front engine mount clears the stand's upright. 

Success !  I can turn the engine over (safely) on the rotisserie spindle without needing the winch.  It's handy that it holds the engine at any angle without needing the lock-pin.

 

So., back to business . . .

P1320828s.jpg.92560e77a5e7554697cac8287858cb8e.jpg

^ this is as bought.  

But now that I can easily turn the engine on end and upside down, so the muck doesn't all go inside as I scrub it out  ..this is now where we're at (below) . .

P1330036as.thumb.jpg.6bdd6a8fef19b0dc4296b0851e87b36a.jpg    P1330035s.thumb.jpg.2523cbf7123f0ee710b05eed12280cc1.jpg

Perhaps it doesn't look very different, but the filth that came off it was something else.! 

That's enough for tonight.
Pete.

 

Edited by Bfg
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Big difference. 

Nice clean kit to work with. 

 

 

Have you seen Elin Yakov videos he did of his 4 pot. Good reference and hints ant tips. Rusty beauties on YouTube. He did a few in sequence. 

No connection but I follow his channel as he gives a lot back to the Triumph world.  

H

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Hamish
Added video so all in one place
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