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rogerguzzi

TR7 Advice

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Hello All

              I know this is a daft question but I have to start somewhere?

I am 73 years young and own Triumph 1500 Spitfire, Mk2 Vitesse , TR2 and a Morris Minor Traveller plus a few motorcycles!

The Spitfire is modified and runs ITB,s and fuel injection on a modified engine

The Vitesse needs a bit of work to get it road worthy not Konkers

The TR2 is in pieces and I do not think I will ever get it back together.

The Morris Traveller needs a bit of work as well!

2 motorcycles are road worthy and one needs work!

Plus numerous spares etc

So the question is I am thinking of buying a TR7 now while the prices are reasonable

Having a quick look I think I could get a very good soft top for about £6000 (2 litre)

We love Spitty and have done 35000 miles in the last 6 years Spain, Italy, Ireland(north and south) Classic le Mans (4) Classic Spa(3) we love touring

But as we get older she is getting lower to the floor(well feels like it!) so my thoughts turned to a TR7 is Still a Triumph but modernish?(I fancy a Triumph Stag but expensive for a good one and thirsty)

I have never driven one and all the reports I have read say they are not as bad as the non believers make out! (I remember the out cry when windy window TR4,s were allowed in!)

We have owned TR4, Reliant Scimitar, and I have repaired and driven a few TR6,s

I just thought a TR7 may suit better into my dotage 

Now Am I completely mad or does that seem like a good plan?(remember I have to sell it to the Memsahib!)

To be honest I could sell one Motor cycle to buy one? (but its time I tried!!!!! to down size the collection)

Roger

ps be kind to me and break it gently that I am stark raving bonkers!

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Hi Roger

I am a few year younger than you but have enjoyed  my TR7 for 11 years now.

Good points:-

  • Safety protection is better than most UK classics of its age with crumple zone and inertia reel seat belt.
  • Its a very good long distant cruiser - RBRR & 10CR rallies can be completed in total comfort.
  • Handling and performance makes it an easy drive in modern traffic - cruising at 70+ is no issue and it goes round mountain hairpins faster than I dare take it.
  • Heating is good enough to allow top down driving in cold weather

Neutral Points

  • Upgrading the original brakes is essential, but easy
  • Fitting MG wheels and modern tyres improves the handling at a low cost
  • 7's & 8's are still not viewed as real Triumphs by some enthusiasts - not that I am complaining as it keeps them reasonable priced.
  • Front wheel balance needs to be maintained to keep the 50/60 MPH shudder at bay.

Bad Points

  • Rust - get the best bodied car you can.
  • Seat are very comfortable (when in good condition) but extremely low so make sure you can get into car without any problems
  • Steering at low speed is heavy
  • Engine head removal - strong men scream in terror at the very idea! Allow at least a couple of months, but a spare engine can be obtained for 20 quid from S+S so rebuild that at your leisure.

Go on get yourself the 7 you always really wanted.

Happy New Year

Howard

 

 

 

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£20 is a good price for an engine; is that current? (Carriage is likely to be crippling, though...)

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Hello Roger,

Just to add to Howard's useful and informed feedback.

I also rate Spits but sold my last one a few years ago due to being at a similar age to you. Yes I also have a TR7 which I kept because it is more suited to my present situation.

TR7's are very comfortable in both the seats and the suspension. I did raise the seats to make getting in and out easier. The road holding is superb with a flat response around bends.

Loads of room inside and a good size boot. If you are travelling a long distance with lots of stuff then keep the hood up and use the rear shelf.  

To improve the general performance I tried a number of options. The best was to replace the standard exhaust with a standard Stainless Steal type as these normally have less restriction. Then fit richer needles and K&N's with small trumpets. I don't believe the Sport Exhaust set-up is worth it on the standard engine, I have tried. I now have lots of low end torque and 40 MPG on a long run. A good long distance sports car.

Yes I would recommend a TR7, but watch out for rust and head gasket problems when buying.

And they are a proper Triumph. 

Dave

 

 

   

 

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2 hours ago, UlsterTR7 said:

£20 is a good price for an engine; is that current? (Carriage is likely to be crippling, though...)

Sorry correction its £40 but it has to be collected.

Cheers

Howard

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£40 still isn't bad; it gives me something to aim for if I banjax my current engine. 

Dave - re TR7 seats - are they screwed into captive nuts? My allen-headed bolts just spin around so at present I can't remove mine...

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Hello All

               Thanks for the comments and advice it gives me something to think about before I jump in with both feet as usual!

Roger

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On 1/3/2019 at 3:09 PM, David James said:

If my memory serves me correctly the seat screws require a torx style male fitting to undo them.

No idea why allen socket head screws were not used.

David

You're correct; I said Allen as I couldn't remember the proper name... but in any case even with the correct socket they just spin around and around... like a record.... I may have fun hacksawing them out though.

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1 hour ago, UlsterTR7 said:

You're correct; I said Allen as I couldn't remember the proper name... but in any case even with the correct socket they just spin around and around... like a record.... I may have fun hacksawing them out though.

Have a look under the car as the captive nuts may have stripped threads and straight nuts fitted to the bolts.

Dave

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The bolts that hold the seat runners to the floor are 8mm Torx headed high tensile bolts.   

The seat belt stalks are mounted to the seat frame.  Sub standard bolts or those that are spinning within their captive nuts are a serious safety issue in an impact.

on a lighter note, the wedge can be a comfortable long distance tourer if that's what you're after.  

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The problem with the seats is that the passenger side is seized solid on the runners, and won't move forward - it's fully back and stuck that way. I want to remove it to renovate the runners, plus check the state of floors etc underneath. There's only one single long thin screw through the floorpan underneath; looks like a factory fitting so I suspect they've never been touched in 40 years.

Ho hum... another job for when I finish the dashboard / heater / engine / suspension / doors....

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The set screws holding the runners down had Allen key sockets on earlier cars. I think it's all Speke built ones and definitely included the few 78 year model cars built there after June 77 till it shut for the Lucas toolmakers strike. Later cars, had the torx, but I don't know if that includes the few 78 y.m. cars from Canley built between April and June 78. I had one, but I never took the seats out.

From memory, if you can't get the seat forward you are basically buggered for getting it out intact.  I find they always seem to move better when they're occupied than not. And getting someone with lots of mass to try might help.

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