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I am struggling to get some 185/70r15 tyres for my steel wheels on the TR6.

Can I use 165/80r15 instead?

Cheers. James

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If you're still looking at options , I fitted a set of Pirelli 195/65R15 P6's late last year-magic ride and handling.

 

For interest, they replaced a set of old 205's which just made the steering & ride too hard.

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If you're still looking at options , I fitted a set of Pirelli 195/65R15 P6's late last year-magic ride and handling.

 

For interest, they replaced a set of old 205's which just made the steering & ride too hard.

That's the size I have on my '6, but in Bridgestone, fitted on 6 inch Revolution alloys. I'm very happy with them.

 

However, if you're looking for the original tyre size for the original steel rims, it's either 165/80 15 or 185/80 15 depending on year of your car (not 70 profile as mentioned above).

 

 

Nigel

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Just fitted new Yokohama 195/65 15 at the weekend. Seem pretty good.

Tim

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I am struggling to get some 185/70r15 tyres for my steel wheels on the TR6.

Can I use 165/80r15 instead?

Cheers. James

I struggled recently as well, so took the plunge and fitted 195x65x15. Vredrestien Quatrac 5's. What a difference - brilliant. and only £52 + 20 fitting by Richard Harris.

 

See my post under Gen Tech - 5th Aug

 

I just wanted to say, that I recently went to Paul Harris for a new set of tyres. Paul advertises in the TR mag. I have to say what a great job he did. I have wire wheels and have never really got them balanced properly. Very near, but not spot on. Paul did and what a difference. He uses lead weights instead of the zinc stuff.Which I understand you can rightfully use for older cars. That allows less weights to be used and increases the accuracy.

 

Then the tyres. I have used for many years Vredestein classic 185x70x15s. They are now in short supply and have become expensive at around £125 Each. . So I opted for the 1st time to fit 195x65x15s. Paul recommended Vredestien Quatrac 5's.£52 each + fitting £20. Well they are very grippy, no noise, and what a difference to the ride. Wonderful.

 

Thank you Paul

No connection just a happy customer and wanted to pass this on.

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Recently fitted a set of 185/70 Vredestein Sprint Classics to VUX ordered on-line from Blackcircles.

 

Cheers

Andrew

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I struggled recently as well, so took the plunge and fitted 195x65x15. Vredrestien Quatrac 5's. What a difference - brilliant. and only £52 + 20 fitting by Richard Harris.

 

See my post under Gen Tech - 5th Aug

 

I just wanted to say, that I recently went to Paul Harris for a new set of tyres. Paul advertises in the TR mag. I have to say what a great job he did. I have wire wheels and have never really got them balanced properly. Very near, but not spot on. Paul did and what a difference. He uses lead weights instead of the zinc stuff.Which I understand you can rightfully use for older cars. That allows less weights to be used and increases the accuracy.

 

Then the tyres. I have used for many years Vredestein classic 185x70x15s. They are now in short supply and have become expensive at around £125 Each. . So I opted for the 1st time to fit 195x65x15s. Paul recommended Vredestien Quatrac 5's.£52 each + fitting £20. Well they are very grippy, no noise, and what a difference to the ride. Wonderful.

 

Thank you Paul

No connection just a happy customer and wanted to pass this on.

Hi Bill,

 

I assume that they are radials but are they guaranteed to be suitable for wire wheels, as a number of tyre manufactures do not recommend there use on wire wheels? Michelin being the most vocal on this subject and not long ago repeated their warning on this subject in TR Action.

 

Bruce,

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I've got Michelin XWX 185/70 on my driver which has 6" Panasport wheels ( too wide for 165s ). These are dead ringers for the 165/80 diameter originally fitted to non-US cars. I love them, but they are pricey. In fact, I may be the only one who has ever fitted these to a TR. V speed rated.

 

195s won't contact the pavement across the tread at 25+ psi inflation. I put over 40K miles on a set of Michelin Pilots in this size and found at least 1/2" of tread was aloft on each side. To test this, paint a stripe of rubber preservative across the tread and take a short drive minimizing lateral g forces - you'll see!

 

I had XAS on my other car which were the most phenomenal I've had; trouble is they're NLA in 185 which I needed for its 3.7:1 diff. I just replaced them with XVS.

 

For the 3.45:1 diff and factory wheels I reckon the XAS or the 185/70 XWX are the top contenders. For the money maybe the Vredestein 185/70 is the best bet ( ask others ).

 

Cheers,

Tom

 

XWX:

post-1059-0-64690100-1536155312_thumb.jpg

Edited by Tom Fremont

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Hi Bill,

 

I assume that they are radials but are they guaranteed to be suitable for wire wheels, as a number of tyre manufactures do not recommend there use on wire wheels? Michelin being the most vocal on this subject and not long ago repeated their warning on this subject in TR Action.

 

Bruce,

Yes there are radial and suitable for wire wheels, as fitted.

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I put a set of Vredestein Sprint classic 165 x 80 x 15 HR 86H tyres on my TR6pi. They handle very well.

 

Regards,

 

Dave from a Hot Sunny Spain

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Tom,

interesting what you said about the contact patch on the 195s.

I've just replaced my 195s which had worn out. Interestingly they were every uniformly worn across the tyre.. The fitter even commented that it was unusual to see such homogenous wear, particularly in an old car (cheek!)

Cheers

Tim

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Not surprising, Tim, as the outer tread is worn faster on the fronts due to cornering and the inner tread is worn faster on the rears due to negative camber ^_^ , so rotating them regularly ought to even things out nicely!

 

The extra width ( and 1/2 inch on a side isn't that much ) doesn't really make much of a contribution. I found 185s made the steering lighter, and I had to adjust to a sense of oversteer resulting from the improved responsiveness.

 

195s are a very popular fitment to these cars. They are a little smaller in diameter than original 165s though.

 

Cheers,

Tom

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Hi Tom,

Have to admit to never rotating them. So was also surprised that the fronts wore out at the same time as the rears.

Know what you mean about 1/2 inch being not much difference. If anything mine tends to slight understeer which is more comfortable for me given that I have been brought up on FWD. Although if I do want tail out fun I have an mg midget that can give me this in spades.

Tim

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Thanks very much for the info and the very speedy responses! Tyres on order!

Will let you know how it handles/looks.

The trip to Spa 6hrs should give me plenty to talk about!

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Hi James and everyone else

 

Was it 165/80's you ordered in the end?

 

My understanding on OE tyre sizes was 165/80 (UK) or 185/80 (USA) redlines i think. No sure if the 185's were options here or what the rest of the world got.

 

Most people think about going wider and lower profile with modern tyres to keep the rolling radius the same or similar and costs sensible.

 

But my thought is that going much wider and lower changes the characteristics of the drive.

 

Modern wider low profile tyres have way more grip and are stiffer and breakaway tends to be thus more sudden. Older designs in narrower widths breakaway sooner but generally in a more gentle way.

 

So it seems to me that you are trading more outright grip for for more gentle (maybe predictable?) handling with less outright grip.

 

I agree the cars were designed with 165/185's in mind as that was pretty much what was generally available back then but that should not rule out using newer designs or sizes if suitable and available.

 

But my car came on 165/80's and i'll probably keep it that way whatever the cost of the tyres (well Almost :D )

 

Cheers

 

Keith

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Hi Bill,

I assume that they are radials but are they guaranteed to be suitable for wire wheels, as a number of tyre manufactures do not recommend there use on wire wheels? Michelin being the most vocal on this subject and not long ago repeated their warning on this subject in TR Action.

 

Bruce

 

Bruce,

 

Happy to be corrected but I think the advice you are referring to, relates not to wire wheels per se but to the use of inner tubes. Most modern wire wheels are now tubeless so shouldn't be an issue.

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Bruce,

 

Happy to be corrected but I think the advice you are referring to, relates not to wire wheels per se but to the use of inner tubes. Most modern wire wheels are now tubeless so shouldn't be an issue.

Michelin started on this theme over 40+ years ago and from memory it was about the flexing of the rim as in those days there were less spokes in the wheels sold and there had been instantances of tyres rolling off the rim when cornering. Also as you state they always had inner tubes fitted. Remember the original wire rims were then Dunlop made in India?

 

Bruce.

 

Bruce.

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Keith,

You are absolutely right that lower profile would lead to less progressive break away. However my observations which include spirited driving on a number of track laps days is that break away is still pretty progressive with 195/65. Certainly can't be called "snap". My only comparison to higher profile was on my uncles TR4A so not a direct comparison. With these tyres the car seemed to oversteer more in corners which made me reduce my entry speed significantly. However I did enjoy the lighter steering.

Tim

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Michelin started on this theme over 40+ years ago and from memory it was about the flexing of the rim as in those days there were less spokes in the wheels sold and there had been instantances of tyres rolling off the rim when cornering. Also as you state they always had inner tubes fitted. Remember the original wire rims were then Dunlop made in India?

 

Bruce.

 

Bruce.

Possibly more like the change in the rim edge design for tubeless tyres as they have a different shape to stop the tyre coming off the rim in the event of sudden deflation.

Stuart.

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Hello,Another factor in fitting tubes to tubeless tyres is friction thus extra heat build up.regards,Michael.( most TR wire wheels).

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185 ! 195 ! ...What's wrong with the correct 165 section tyre?  Modern compounds have all the grip a TR6 can handle, unless your car is prepared for racing!

All the components were designed by engineers to take the loads of the 1960/1970 165 tyres of the time...Dunlop SP Sport & Michelin XAS. So unless you've replaced all your stub axles etc surely you're placing your 40 year old components at risk, and for what gain...Looks?

I've said it before...You wouldn't put fatter tyres on a classic Aston DB6, so why would you do that to your TR6 ?

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28 minutes ago, CP26309 said:

 

I've said it before...You wouldn't put fatter tyres on a classic Aston DB6, so why would you do that to your TR6 ?

When I last looked the doyen of classic car tyres had a couple of sizes for ones DB 5 and 6 

185 and 205 so even in the rarified field of top echelon classics the owner has a choice to suit themselves. 

 

By all means stay original and enjoy the art of drifting through hispeed corners a wonderful skill. 

H

D0520765-5DC0-4CC6-ABA6-48278AAB5CB9.png

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Hello, The size of the tyres on most TR6's from new (USA)? 185R15. Regards.Michael.

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On 9/5/2018 at 3:37 PM, Bill Bourne said:

Yes there are radial and suitable for wire wheels, as fitted.

For what it's worth. After 4-500 miles. I have to say. These tyres are brilliant. the ride has transformed my 6. 

Here's a review.

http://www.tyrereviews.co.uk/Tyre/Vredestein/Quatrac-5.htm

best Bill

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