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Discs with Mintex Pads

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Any disc recommendations for 1109 and 1144 Mintex pads?

Standard 209327,

Slotted/Drilled,

Brand? (Moss, TRW, EBC....)

 

Jochem

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Just used standard.. had heard that the slotted and drilled weren't much benefit if you have the correct pads.

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Standard discs, or if you really want more stopping power/resistance to fade, consider vented discs with spaced calipers. There used to be a kit available, from EBC if memory serves.

 

Nigel

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Ive tried standard, the £70 ‘dimpled and slotted’ ones and £140 Rossini drilled and slotted

 

Cant detect a braking difference with Mintex 1109s, although the Rossinis make a nice whoosing noise

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Where does "1109" sit in the Minted range?

Like all brake material.makers, they offer a range of 'heats'. 1144 for road use, 1155 for fast road/race use, and 1166 for outright race. The 'hotter' the more likely NOT to stop.you right out of the garage, or after a motorway run.

Strong agreement with above, drilled, grooved or dimpled disks are pure going. Get venteds if you get brake fade.

 

John

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1109 is the road pad John

 

Since i changed callipers , to toyota 4 pots, i’m unable to find 1144 etc available anywhere.

 

I may go back to std callipers as i think the pad material choice may offer more benefits than the 4 pots

 

Steve

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Mintex Racing Compound Brake Pads

The Mintex brand is the most famous when it comes to motorsport. Through intense Research and Development Mintex materials cater not only for Original Equipment and Aftermarket needs but at the other extreme for competition purposes. It is from motorsport that the latest family of Mintex materials have been developed. Material compounds available are M1144 for fast road, track day and light race use, M1155 for use when a higher brake temperature is used commonly in Rallying and M1166 commonly for endurance racing cars where temperatures are sustained for long periods of time.

 

Just bear in mind in the TR Register Race Championship as was if you competed in the "Tuned" class, ( but with modded engines on SUs putting out 150 HP at the rear axle) so many cars were competing swith the equivalent of nearly 160 HP per ton at the drive axle and the class was limited to standard discs. So the standard disc with the Mintex M1144 should be good enough to stop your car.

 

Mick Richards

Edited by Motorsport Mickey

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thanks for the replies.....

last question......I am driving EBC discs with EBC red stuff....

I will change the red stuff to the new 1144s....but can I keep the EBC disc?

They have only been on there for about 2000 mls. Mr Revington does not like EBC at all...just wondering to change disc, eventhough no fading, straight....

 

Jochem

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I agree, however this overview made me wonder.

Disc on Y

Pads on X

post-15451-0-99102100-1530247591_thumb.jpg

Unfortunately Mintex is not listed.....

Jochem

Edited by JochemsTR

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Steve,

 

These people (Mintex) will reline brake shoes.

"https://www.mintexclassic.com/classic-brake-upgrades/"

 

 

Alan[/size]

Thanks Alan, i’ll see if they do pads as well as shoes!

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Don't see how the brand of disc matters- a steel disc is a steel disc.

I'm afraid not Mike. If you were to say a disc is a disc is a disc that would be more correct.

 

MYTH # 2 - RACING BRAKE DISCS ARE MADE FROM STEEL

To digress for a moment "steel discs" are a misnomer frequently used by people who should know better. This group includes TV commentators and drivers being interviewed. Except for some motorcycles and karts, all ferrous discs are made from cast iron - an excellent material for the job. While steel has a higher tensile strength, cast iron is many times stronger than disc brake requirements. Its thermal transfer characteristics are significantly better than those of steel so that the heat generated at the interface between pad and disc is efficiently carried through the friction faces to the interior surface of the disc and into the vanes from where the heat is dissipated into the air stream. Cast iron is more dimensionally stable at elevated temperature than steel and is a better heat sink - so let us hear no more talk of "steel" brake discs.

 

This refers to racing use but actually applies to road also.

 

Mick Richards

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Hello Mike R.

...NICE! Thank you for this explanation.

On the other hand, still does not explain why certain pads are not recommended with certain disks....would you know the reasoning for this? Or is this marketing by the great OEMs?

Jochem

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I agree with Mike- top material modern cast irons for many applications, often underrated.

 

A lot of those discs appear to be cast iron with various degrees of surface finish .

 

I'd just use the pads and keep a close eye on them, but if I was worried send the above article to Mintex and ask them to comment.

 

Was there any text supporting the chart?

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Hi Jochem,

I have been using standard discs from Moss and Mintex 1144 (Mintex-MGB633M1144) pads for over two years now with no problems. They feel much better than standard pads.

 

Cheers,

 

Vince.

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just talked to Mintex....no known limitations regarding disc and pad combination....so I guess I will keep my EBC discs and start driving the 1144s....

 

jochem

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I was fiddeling with the brake pads for quite a long time.

I had some Mintes and Ferrodos that covered the rims with dust.

I had these Golden China pads that failed

I tried Green and Yellow stuff where I must say the yellow already

seamed to brake not that good when cold.

 

Anyway all my problems are gone with the vented discs because

I do no longer have to expand the working range to higher temperature.

For normal sports street use they are perfect and I know in motorsports

they are not allowed and not that much required.

 

The difference is simply on the track the discs are hot and the pads, too.

They keep hot and with that pads with high temperature working range

are the prefect choice. We may drive without braking for some time and

have to rely on fully cold brakes that have to work properly.

 

So we better limit the brakes to the upper temperature range by venting

and have pads that work perfect when cold.

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Hello Andreas,

both Moss and Rimmer offered an EBC spacer kit. Vented discs with spacers between the calipers. However, no more!!

I cannot find them anymore.

Option 1. normal calipers with proper pads.

Option 2. aftermarket 4 piston calipers such as Hispec including pads. However, in Germany not allowed.

 

Jochem

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Option 3 could be to fit a set of Jaguar 3 pot calipers. Standard fittings and discs.

 

To be honest, for normal road use, you shouldn’t need anything other than standard discs, calipers and pads. All good quality of coutures.

 

If you do want a set of Jag calipers, I think I may have a reconditioned pair somewhere.

 

David

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I like this.

 

..."Ideally, in order to avoid either putting up with squealing brakes that will not stop the car well around town or with pad fade on the track or coming down the mountain at speed, we should change pads before indulging in vigorous automotive exercise. No one does.

The question remains, what pads should be used in high performance street cars - relatively low temperature street pads or high temperature race pads? Strangely enough, in my opinion, the answer is a high performance street pad with good low temperature characteristics. The reason is simple: If we are driving really hard and begin to run into trouble, either with pad fade or boiling fluid (or both), the condition(s) comes on gradually enough to allow us to simply modify our driving style to compensate. On the other hand, should an emergency occur when the brakes arecold, the high temperature pad is simply not going to stop the car. As an example, during the mid 1960s, those of us at Shelby American did not drive GT 350 or GT 500 Mustangs as company cars simply because they were equipped with Raybestos M-19 racing pads and none of our wives could push on the brake pedal hard enough to stop the car in normal driving."

 

That seems to encompass what many TR owners with race equipment battle with, when the Morris Minor with drum brakes in front jumps on the brakes to make a late turn and and your heart jumps into your mouth because servo or not the pads will not stop your TR in time.

 

This site has given given good information over the years.

http://www.stoptech.com/technical-support/technical-white-papers/-warped-brake-disc-and-other-myths

 

Mick Richards

Edited by Motorsport Mickey

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Hello Andreas,

both Moss and Rimmer offered an EBC spacer kit. Vented discs with spacers between the calipers. However, no more!!

I cannot find them anymore.

 

The EBC kit is nice for those who want to keep steel rims.

Due to limited space for the calipers the very small EBC disc is perfect.

With my FORD project 10mm spacers would be required for steel rims.

 

If you are free to choose the FORD disc is better because it has no dimples.

You can not see the difference to original of the swap from the side.

 

Recently two of my friends copied that solution.

In the TR-Freunde forum you can find my report

and many copied it there. Unfortunately they do not tell

the details but you can find a lot in may old thread some years ago.

 

My 2nd option would be the Toyota 4-pot caliper with the vented disc.

Can also be found in the WWW but I like mine more because I use

original calipers and pads and it looks original.

 

post-13092-0-20199600-1530349367_thumb.jpg

Edited by TriumphV8

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Hello Andreas,

I like the vented discs....just need to get a hold on the spacers between the calipers and the special rubbers and longer bolts....

 

I will try the mintex1144 on my EBC discs for now.....

 

Jochem

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