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pinky

huge fuel leak , frightning, tr6 on webbers,

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Just to be clear I am not advocating Halon, just saying that the AFFF ones are not nearly as good, you cant buy new Halon so your would need to find an old one, its its obviously not so Ozone right but as you are hopefully never going to need it you wont be adding to the damage of the enviroment picking a S/H one up.

Honestly speaking in this case its a bit regulations overkill as if your car goes up in flames you will be causing a lot more pollution (smoke, spillages and scrap) than 2,5kg of Halon.

As I wrote before as someone who has a proper FIA system in a car, and had a petrol fire once a petrol fire starts wont be enough unless its a lot more than 2,5kgs.

Whatever... just be safe please.

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I can't make out if the filter was on the high pressure side ( unregulated ).

 

Anyway, I've been using the AC type mechanical fuel pump with my Webers since way back in the 1900s, over 125K miles and find it good for at least 5500 rpm service ( not sustained, though ). Aside from the filters in the Webers ( super, superfine brass mesh ) there is a filter in the pump itself, and I've copied the factory habit of fitting one upstream of the pump ( AC type, metal housing ) which is gravity fed from the tank.

 

 

For some reason, Weber users like to employ 100 psi fuel pumps and regulate them down to 2 ^_^ .

 

Cheers,

Tom

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John,

 

You mentioned an auto cutoff device:

“…Could be done, but it would need a flow sensor on the line, and some electronics that defines "Excess flow"….”

 

Really odd co-incidence that, because only last week I was thinking about exactly the same sort of system that could be used to make a single master cylinder braking system safer. A cutoff and sensor in line to each slave cylinder and if there was excess fluid flow (major leak/broken pipe) the flow to that particular cylinder could be cut off.

 

It’s not a difficult system to design, (a lot easier for just the petrol pipe.) There must be some industrial system already out there somewhere that does exactly what you envisage. Broken pipes posing potential disastrous results must be quite common in many industries.

(Wher's Roger? I bet the aerospace industry has something.)

 

Charlie

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For hydraulic systems parallel flow valves are not uncommon, to ensure 2 (or more) hydraulic cylinders travel the same distance (oil volume).

Or require a minimum back pressure, as required.

I would not use any of it on a car brake system, as it may (will) impact brake performance and adds complexity.

The simple solution to detect oul leaks is a float with switch in the filling cap, which is common on modern cars.

Any modification you make, even with rhe best intentions, may have adverse effects, that cannot always be detected on the drawing board.

If you have a single hydraulic system, conversion to a split system however IS a sensible and prooven modification.

Regards,

Waldi

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To be pumping the amount that Pinky said i would guess that the filter was after the pump. Have seen a new one split along the glass seem after only a week. A lot of the TR companies used to supply these with their rebuild cars fitted pre pump so no pressure,i wonder if they still do ?

Very interesting about the filter internals breaking down with the new fuels as the person parked next to me at Silverstone had a fuel starvation problem with the mentioned filter which when cleaned had a sandy coloured deposit inside.

 

ROY

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hi Roy

 

phaset pump to filter, to fuel regulator to inline pressure dial to webber carbs

the pump I believe backs of when fuel,is not required so I presume the presure is decreased,

I don't think there is a problem with the setup just a crap glass filter

looking at it, it isnt very good, should have rung aLark bells

 

pink

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Hi mines on Weber’s with a facet fast road pump .I would think the pump works at its manufacture output 6-7psi in my case .The webers require less than this controlled by the fuel regulator .My inline filter (the plastic type non cleanable) is after the regulator so under a couple of less psi .All of this is fitted in the right hand side of the boot so nothing in engine bay . It’s been like this for 20 + years.

Chris

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As you confirm the filter was after the pump so i would place it between the tank and pump therefor under no pressure. I use the facet red top pump which has a cleanable filter as part of the pump.

As i said i have seen these glass ones fail .

 

Roy

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ok i miss read. Better luck with the new one.

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I have a simple replaceable plastic fuel filter sitting between the tank and my standard AC mechanical pump on my TR3a.  This thread has reminded me that it is probably about time that the filter was replaced and in view of the issues highlighted above, what is the best tpe to replace it with - or is my simple and cheap plastic item good enough as a replacement?

Rgds Ian

My existing filter is similar to this

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I believe it was Roger who explained, some while ago, that the innards of a filter sitting between tank and pump, can collapse under the suction and hence block the line.

Best to locate the filter between pump and carburettors, where it is under pressure.

Ian Cornish

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I don't buy this,  as long as the fuel flow is from the inside of the paper element to the out side, then it can't collapse.

Mine is between tank & pump, the pump sucks fuel through the filter inside to outside.

Bob.

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I do not buy any of it as I have used them for years on Webers and never had any problems 

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After a prolonged and intermittent fuelling issue at sprint events last season I thoroughly have been through the fuel systems. (TR3a) Whilst my issue was an old rubber joining pipe I decided on the disposable mesh type in line filter this is clear enough to see in and has great flow on the sucking side of the pump. I wanted to protect the pump from debris.

CC383A49-F86D-4064-AF18-A39700F05427.thumb.jpeg.9dc459860258f22754556e97f24fd4a1.jpeg

i went to this option after a paper style in line filter to the original mech pump collapsed, I think the glue failed allowing the collapse.

D06117DB-6594-4DA4-99C1-BF1659ED6F67.jpeg.b864335013fb200556402711cf093978.jpeg

I have seen one of the glass type filters crack. We thought due to vibration. It was on the suck side so drew in air ( causing hesitation on a Morgan with tr engine) rather than sprayed fuel.
 

 

an interesting aside is the way the fuel in the filter changes colour with age from a new fuel very pale tinge to a much darker whiskey type of colour. When not run. The tank fuel stays pale colour.

H

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38 minutes ago, Hamish said:

i went to this option after a paper style in line filter to the original mech pump collapsed, I think the glue failed allowing the collapse.

D06117DB-6594-4DA4-99C1-BF1659ED6F67.jpeg.b864335013fb200556402711cf093978.jpeg

I think had you have fitted it the other way round it would have been fine

Bob.

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These are what Robsport use on Triumph Stags. I bought 2 for less than a tenner. 

Chris

20200401_114402_copy_571x640.jpg

Edited by ChrisR-4A

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2 hours ago, Lebro said:

I think had you have fitted it the other way round it would have been fine

Bob.

You may be right bob. 
but without thinking about the pressure on the element I was guided by the fuel flow arrow. 

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The arrow is correct Hamish, the fuel should flow radially “inwards” in these filters, in your pic from bottom to top.

Waldi

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