Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Jomac

What spares would you take?

Recommended Posts

Take everything as whatever breaks will be whatvyou dont have.

The most important thing is the list with local TR members in the areas you are driving most will

be happy to help if they can.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure where it went, but I read a post here earlier that talked of a previously planned Emergency Breakdown Directory. I've often thought that such a thing would be incredibly useful, whether in a digital format or hard copy, particularly to owners like myself who might lack confidence in travelling longer distances because they are not so knowledgeable about how to fix their cars at the side of the road. Younger people, especially, I think are put off owning classics because of this sort of fear, so anything that might bolster their confidence has to be a good thing. To many it would be worth the sub on its own I reckon.

 

I'm sure many members would be happy to be included in such a directory, if it was just phone number and email address. I know I would. Not that I could offer much in the way of technical assistance, but at least I could help someone move their car or take them a flask of tea if they broke down close by.

 

Something to consider.

Edited by TR5tar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dave Worne was compiling one a few years ago,not sure weather it ever got finalized.

Edited by TR NIALL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dave Worne was compiling one a few years ago,not sure weather it ever got finalized.

Hi Niall,

PM sent.

 

Roger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My list, from a 3750 mile trip in the US 9 years ago ( with no smart phone or GPS - ancient times! ):

 

- Spares brought along: fan belt, water pump, alternator, plugs, points, condenser, dist cap, rotor, O/D solenoid, (2) UJs, fuses, bulbs, thermostat, fuel pump repair kit, fuel line hose, heater valve, Weber jets for leaner settings, oil PRV, Kendall 20W50 motor oil and STP fuel additive. All fit within spare tyre well. Spares used: none, aside from oil and fuel additive.

 

I should add that quite a bit of servicing was done beforehand, even to the tune of cleaning and regreasing the entire wiper rack and gear, clutch hydraulics etc.

 

Cheers,

Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The existing European Breakdown Directory compiled by Chris Hale (circa 2005) is still available to download here:

https://www.tr-register.co.uk/past-issue/2015/08/0054/European-Breakdown-Directory

 

Dave Worne was / is compiling an updated version but to date has only been able to verify the data for France and Spain. It relies upon contacts in the respective countries to verify whether the locations and businesses are still open or not. He has submitted the data to the office of what he managed to get, but verifiers have not been forthcoming this time around and I think it is fair to say he has struggled to update the data reliably as a result, despite his really hard work and determination on the project.

 

Mick Forey has recently brought this back on the radar and as a result we plan to add to the website, the data we do have as a searchable directory list, rather like the local group pages with their map (and button to show the listing nearest to your smartphone location) in the not too distant future. Then that way, it will be able to be verified by feedback from travellers as we go. Its a project I will get on to as soon as I possibly can.

 

We used to produce print versions, but there was very little interest and remaining stocks were given away in renewal packs and at events to move them on. The PDF is useful if you want to just print out info for the countries you are visiting en route.

 

I also recommend the spares and spanners guide as well for PI cars:

https://www.tr-register.co.uk/past-issue/2015/08/0008/TR-Register-Spares-and-Spanners-Guide-for-longdistance-touring-preparation-PI-Cars

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Wayne. It'll be very useful when it is up-to-date. What's the timeline for that looking like?

 

It would be nice if a directory of members who might like to volunteer in each area in a breakdown situation could be compiled too. I'm sure many would be keen to help.

 

Cheers, Darren

Edited by TR5tar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wayne,

You have a PM.

Maybe I can help with the Dutch information.

Regards,

Waldi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Years ago when Finn Purcell and John Soffe were the international group guys I used to be on the list for Italy.

If your going to be in the Italian Alps, always happy to lend a spanner or do a spot of translation.

I think most members would.

So maybe just easiest to offer availability rather than trying to create a list again?

Tony

Edited by Rem18

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Non-serious contribution follows:

Even more years ago, 'Motor magazine published a hardback book that included a list of tools and spares to take when touring - copy attached.

It gives an insight into what motoring was like a century ago!

post-12457-0-36752200-1524934929_thumb.jpg

Edited by Alfrom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you referring to the. Asbestos gloves Batman used to use to answer the hotphone?

Asbestos sheeting?

Edited by Rem18

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Replacement leather for clutch !!

My dad had a 1913 overland that had a leather clutch

A sort of cone shape that went into the flywheel. A massive iron thing that took 2 of us to lift.

post-14544-0-48894900-1525175642_thumb.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A condensor is a tiny thing, so maybe its academic that it's not necessary!

The device fails by the insulation failing and it short circuiting the points, so no 'make and break', no spark.

But it's only there to reduce arcing at the points, which wears them more rapidly, but they will still last more than 1000 miles.

A simple test that the condensor is the cause of a problem is to remove it (or disconnect it, reliably, so it can't short anything else, or tangle with the rotor arm or shaft).

If normal function returns then you have cured the problem! Drive on, until it's convenient to buy and fit a new one.

 

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The OP didn't say where they intended to tour, but if abroad, then there are some specific spares and items that they must carry, dependant on the countrty they pass through..

See: https://www.rac.co.uk/drive/travel/driving-abroad/checklist/

 

Most importnat are the HiViz jackets for all on board, in the passenger compartment, so you put them on before you get out on the motorway.

Warning triangle

First aid kit.

Headlamp deflectors (Black tape on the prisms of the lamp cover are just as good)

European Health Insurance card (no doubt, soon to be invalidated)

 

I don't agree that you need to take any car fluids, if your car is well maintained, unless you are heading for the outer reaches of Europe. The French and Germans have plenty of service stations, and sell them in hypermarkets too!

BUT, fluids for you and your companions. Drink plenty - of water!

 

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

John - if using conventional points, one of Martin Jay's (Distributor Doctor) condensers should always be in the car's on-board spares, alongside one of his rotor arms and contact sets. Although the superior quality means that failure is unlikely, these items are so small (and inexpensive) that it is daft not to have them aboard.

Ian Cornish

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We once lost a week in S. Europe 40 years ago when I was a kid due to a cracked rotor arm.

Today many mechanics dont even know what a rotor arm is.

I have never converted to electronic for fear to being stuck if it went pop overseas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ian,

I went to a Lumenition, optical substitute for the CB years ago. Totally reliable, nothing to wear or renew.

But I hoped that people could be reassured and interested by the true purpose of the condensor and how to diagnose and treat it's failure.

 

And despite my recent travails with MegaJolt distributorless ignition (It works, but I can't get it programmed, which is my point of fitting it) so Ford EDIS kit is so robust that even when dragged out of old, scrapped cars it still works perfectly. Beats that complex and breakdown-prone distributor!

 

Sorry, thread diversion!

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Please familiarise yourself with our Terms and Conditions. By using this site, you agree to the following: Terms of Use.