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32 minutes ago, Lebro said:

I like that too, may I copy it please ?

Bob.

Go ahead Bob, and while you’re at it mount it on a flexible stalk with a magnetic mount as I will be doing for use in the engine bay. 

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A lightweight drain plug remover which lives in the travelling tool kit. 

Well, the "special" tool, even with a torch attached, failed to locate the lamp. It was excellent at recovering various small logs, and large stones though. Luckily I had taken along a Plan B - a

Hi, this was one of the first tools I made for my TR4A about 10 years ago, very durable and still in use... Shure someone else has one like this in use and posted it already.

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Nice one Andrew,  I like the simplicity. 

I use something similar when working on my bikes, the problem is the same but, rather than on the flat, I needed to work around peculiar shaped bits of bike.  My solution was a 5" off-cut of mains electrical wire, the stuff with thick copper cores, and to put a crocodile clip onto the ends of two individual wires and then a large clip onto the other end.  The larger clip clamps onto the edge of tinware on the bike (the electrical box's lid or the headlamp-shell usually) ..with a piece of inner-tube under to protect the paintwork. The other end's two crocodile clips hold the wires to be soldered. Inbetween, the three copper cores of the wire 'arm' are pretty stiff, but still flexible enough to bend as necessary. . .

P1070824s.jpg.c9697fe47c53dc3526119fe2f788b5f8.jpg

P1070825s.jpg.e05c27eaf0f487bb9bbfff4e34a003b0.jpg

I've been using it for almost 10 years now, on my own and customer's bikes, so it's paid for itself.  I've also used it on my last classic, clamping onto the bonnet gutter flange or anything else that was handy.  

However, I think your pegs would be quicker to use when I can solder wires at the bench.  So, likewise if I might, I'll copy the idea but stick a strip of Velcro to its baseboard, and it's partner Velcro onto the lid of my electrical box (..so it's always handy) but when attached together the wires wouldn't push away from the iron. 

Cheers, Pete.    

Edited by Bfg
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Sorry it posted twice but I can't see how to delete this copy

 

Nice one Andrew,  I like the simplicity. 

etc, etc, .....  Cheers, Pete.    

Edited by Bfg
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  • 2 weeks later...

Currently I had to bend a 4 mm sheet steel, this is not possible with my standard sheet metal bender.

So my idea was to make a small bending tool from for my DIY 20 to hydraulic press - to get a press-brake.

I used a piece of T40 and U40/20 bar, two short pieces of pipes, two M12 threaded bars, nuts and washers (and my hack saw :)).

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The nuts allow to fix the sheet steel and find exactly the line where I want to bend.

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I'm very pleased with the result

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Ciao, Marco

Edited by Z320
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Faced with a similar problem I marked the line of the bends, scored them with a cutting disc in my angle grinder and then once I’d bent my plate to shape I ran a line of weld up the cuts.

Rgds Ian

Edited by Ian Vincent
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Hi Ian,

I also worked like this until now,

but I was afraid the 4 weldseams, each 90 mm long, will bend the sheet the way they want and not like I need it.

And I don't like welding.

And this is the "modified and fabricated tools" thread....

:)

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I just had to make a bracket from stainless steel only 2mm thick - I managed in my vice with brute strength and a hammer, but I wish I had had Marco's setup!

John

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  • 1 month later...
Posted (edited)

Recently, I realised that I had messed up in an engine rebuild - the cam timing was wrong!      The engine was in the car, fully installed, so I didn't want to take it out again to re-time it, so rad out, front of enegne stripped and crank set to TDC.    Cam sprocket off, now to turn the cam to the correct vaalve lift - and its very stiff!    A pin wrench in the sprocket holes doesn't work, I need a proper lever, so I made one.

Length of 20mm angle iron from the offcuts box, two bolts through that will screw into the end of the camshaft.    Looks obvious.   But the two nuts are there not to fix the biolts in place but as spacers, to offset the lever from the knob that locates the sprocket.    They are not tight, so that the bolts can be  turned into the cam shaft.    

IMG_20210308_182941.jpg

Edited by john.r.davies
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  • 3 months later...

Stretch guage.

A recent thread here,  https://www.tr-register.co.uk/forums/index.php?/topic/77602-arp-bolts-in-maxpeeding-con-rods/ asked about the correct procedure to tighten ARP bolts, as in MaXpeedingrods, and other engine applications.     The advice, taken from ARPs own literature, was that torque should be considered secondary to bolt lengthening under stress.   We all know that bolts stretch elastically when tightened, but the torque applied to stretch it is usually used as an adequate surrogate for measuring stretch.  Like the OP in that thread, I'll soon be using ARP bolts in conrods, so I'm grateful to know this, but I like to get some ideas first.

How to measure stretch?    A "stretch guage" is available from ARP themselves, for £150!     That incorporates a dial guage, which no doubt inflates the price, mounted on a metal "C" whose other end has a screw adjuster.    Other, cheaper versions are available, but they look very flimsy!

The obvious alternative is a micrometer screw guage, but the threaded end of the bolt is inside the bore of the threaded hole in the big end, so might not be accessible with the spindle of the micrometer.      A spacer could be inserted into that bore, so that the micrometer will bridge the gap between the bolt head and the back of the spacer.

To me, it seems that the spacer need not be precision made, as long as it is the only one used, and as long as the ends are reasonably smooth and square to the axis.   Could I cut one from rod, or even tube of a suitable diameter, dress it smooth and square, and use it with confidence?   I'll be grateful for your views, before I try it!

JOhn

 

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I just did some simple measurements on the bolts and space available in the block around the crank when rods are fitted.

Made mine from a lump of 19 mm aluminium plate.  I originally planned to use 13mm.

Bought the indicator with 12mm travel for about a tenner on eBay.   The lower pin and dial gauge are clamped with 4 mm grub screws.

The pin is 6mm silver steel with a point and flat on side for grub screw.

Drilling the two holes concentrically for the pin and gauge was done on the lathe by clamping the 12 mm plate in the tool post.  
Shaping was done roughly by joining up drill holes with a saw them wizzing a fly cutter across the surfaces on the lathe with the plate held again in the tool post.

The challenge in use is getting the gauge to clamp squarely.  I have added a rubber band to push the pointer of the gauge out from the top plunger.

The two spare cap bolts are slaves for clamping the rods closed, instead of risking the ARP bolts.

PM me if you want a sketch of mine with dimensions.

Peter W

 

 

C65740D3-7E38-4F12-B17E-C90FDB3322B0.jpeg

Edited by BlueTR3A-5EKT
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Thnak you, Peter!   That looks better than the ARP version!  PM sent.

Has anyone a view on the micrometer method?    I don't have all the machining tools that Peter has, his design is masterly, but a LOT of hand work!

JOhn

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This is a quick and incomplete drawing of the item I made. pdf and jpg format.

I reduced the overall length from 150mm to 120 mm in the final version to use an existing long pattern drill I have for the gauge and pointer to align concentrically.

The 4mm grub screws to retain the pin and gauge are not shewn.

I used 19 mm plate instead of 13 mm as that is what I had under the bench!  13mm would have been lighter to hold.

The 20 mm throat depth is fine and probably could be reduced to 15mm. - measure your con rods.

Cheers

Peter W

 

Bolt Stretch Gauge 5.jpg

Bolt Stretch Gauge 5.PDF

Edited by BlueTR3A-5EKT
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I have thought about using a micrometer.  You would need one with a pointed anvil to rest in the ARP bolt head depression.

Peter W

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Posted (edited)

Could it not seat on the face of the bolt head?

Thanks for the plans!

Edited by john.r.davies
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  • 2 months later...

Hi there,

the last two days I had some peaceful hours at my workshop and made ths "pocket"-tool.

The squared tube is from a office table leg....

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Guess what it is made for (it works!)?

Sorry, no bottle opener :lol: - but I try!

Ciao, Marco

Edited by Z320
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Hi, it works like this

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The rear bolt is only a "pillar" and will not be spinned, this is why it does not damage the cast iron

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After using it I will make a second one with some modifications.

The valve itself I keep up with a nylon rope going through the spark plug bore and pressed up by the piston.

But I have the idea for making a tool therfore too.

This makes it possible to change a broken spring with the head on the engine.

Or in my case, to fit valve stem seals with the head still on the engine.

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Ciao, Marco

Edited by Z320
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Ready,

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It will work on the engine with the cylinder head on the engine (done not yet)

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But tested on my old engine, easy to use with or without the lever with the head off from the engine (and a pleasure to make the tool)

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Ciao, Marco

Edited by Z320
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More than clever, to my mind!  Brilliant!    Epecially the catch inside the chamber to retain the valve - I've never liked the string idea!

JOhn

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