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Hello all...

 

Let's try to keep this to ourselves (I don't want those Peerless guys getting wind of this) I've started restoring a 1960 3A :o

 

I know, SPLITTER!

 

I'm just asking in case there's a good resource/cheat sheet of 'sensible/practical modifications' for people doing a complete nut and bolt rebuild.

 

Does anything want strengthening/beefing up/adding/cutting off (I'm talking about the car) etc on either the body/chassis ?

 

Are there any well known weaknesses or failings (I'm talking about the TR...) that can be improved upon without spoiling the originality (noticeably)?

 

(I'm certainly thinking about the rear crank rubber oil seal mod as no one would ever know except the people I get my driveway cleaning fluid from...)

 

My chassis has already been powder coated (that was already done) and I intend to get the endoscope into the chassis tubes to preclude any nasty surprises later but now's the time to make any mods if any are necessary.

 

I'm not aiming for bloody minded 100% originality to the absolute exclusion of every day practicality but I don't want to be adding ABS and IOBD2 either. The car will be used virtually every day in the same way I used my Warwicks/Peerlii in the past so it's got to be reliable and reasonably usable in modern conditions (i.e. crawling along at 2mph 50% of the time and having the suspension battered to death by 4" deep pot holes the other 50%.

 

Once any modifications and repairs to the body/chassis are complete, my first job will be mounting the (etch primed) body on the chassis so that all the paint prep work can be carried out and panel gaps sorted. So for instance.....

 

Where do I buy (or do I make) the best possible body mounting kit? I've seen talk on here of the old fabric impregnated rubbers being better, if this is true does anyone sell them?

 

I'm sure I will have a million questions but I'll try to ask some of you in person as I look around all the 3A's at Malvern this year...

 

Thank you for reading this far and if you have any comments that will be a great bonus!

 

Jon :)

 

 

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Jon, welcome to the TR Reg forum. Is this your first foray into TR sidescreen territory ?.

 

When I restored my 1960 TR3A I made a number of chassis and body mods under the direction of forum member Stuart (Watermill carriage company). These included:

 

Strengthening the rear spring tube

Modifying the rear shock mounts

http://www.tr-register.co.uk/rebuilders-diary/2015/09/0026/1960-TR3A-Restoration-The-Chassis

 

 

Adding four point seat belt attachment points to the tub

http://www.tr-register.co.uk/rebuilders-diary/2015/09/0016/1960-TR3A-Restoration-Installing-modern-seatbelts

 

 

Other suggested mods that I did not do (I was already overwhelmed, in way over my head)

Bracing behind the A posts to give them some additional support

Adding gutters and drains behind the front baffle plates to catch water draining into that cavity.

 

Outside of the chassis/body there are quite a few options for mods to the suspension and steering starting with poly bushes and going all the way to using TR4 front suspension and converting to rack and pinion if that is your thing.

 

Stan

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Hi Jon,

 

well how the hell are you?

 

I'll start this off with some chassis stregnthening.

 

Rear spring shackle mounts need another tube welding inside, front rear spring mounting pins, need removing now, while

there isn't a body in the way and copious amounts of freeing, copperslip etc.

 

John.

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oh and rear shock absorber supports crack.

 

there are strengeners available.

 

John.

Edited by john

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Blimey, that was quick responses, thanks chaps...

 

 

Jon, welcome to the TR Reg forum. Is this your first foray into TR sidescreen territory ?.

 

When I restored my 1960 TR3A I made a number of chassis and body mods under the direction of forum member Stuart (Watermill carriage company). These included:

 

Strengthening the rear spring tube

Modifying the rear shock mounts

http://www.tr-register.co.uk/rebuilders-diary/2015/09/0026/1960-TR3A-Restoration-The-Chassis

 

 

Adding four point seat belt attachment points to the tub

http://www.tr-register.co.uk/rebuilders-diary/2015/09/0016/1960-TR3A-Restoration-Installing-modern-seatbelts

 

 

Other suggested mods that I did not do (I was already overwhelmed, in way over my head)

Bracing behind the A posts to give them some additional support

Adding gutters and drains behind the front baffle plates to catch water draining into that cavity.

 

Outside of the chassis/body there are quite a few options for mods to the suspension and steering starting with poly bushes and going all the way to using TR4 front suspension and converting to rack and pinion if that is your thing.

 

Stan

 

 

Thanks for the lightening quick response Stan! Yes I've only ever had Peerless's and Warwicks before (I ran the Peerless register for a while before Nigel Cluley) so although I'm familiar with the mechanicals and electrics, the 3A chassis and body are new territory and I don't want to miss something that's easy to do now and a nightmare to do later.

 

The car is a Californian import to the UK so I need to convert back to RHDrive. It already has a RHD rack conversion but I'm not sure if I want that or not, I've always just had the standard worm and peg on the Peerli and been happy to work on my upper body strength! (beats paying gym membership...)

 

As far as 'how far do I want to go, goes...

 

I'm happy to upgrade stuff that isn't too visible...

 

I'd go for things like optical ignition so long as it's discrete, an alternator hidden in a dynamo case, a brake servo maybe as long as I can hide it well...

 

 

I know, hypocrisy....

 

Cheers, I'll post some pictures when I start...

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Mmmm seat belts...

 

 

To be launched over the wall into the field where the angry bull is or to be strapped tightly into the raging ball of flames...

 

I never know which is best...

 

:blink::D

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Jon,go back to Page 3 post 698 and look at ....So what's happening in your Garage...I've uploaded Photos of some TR3 Chassis Mods that I'm doing at the moment with guidance from Stuart.

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I took the approach that I wanted the full TR3 experience before I started modifying stuff so I kept the TR3 gearbox, steering, generator and the laughable cooling fan. I have the advantage that I also have a TR6 so the TR3 is not my only option for doing Triumph stuff (tours, shows etc). The only thing that I regret is not fitting a pusher cooling fan that could be used in emergencies. We get some very hot days here in the summer and I should have realized that the standard TR3 cooling will struggle when it is 100 degrees out and it is idling in traffic.

 

I have never felt that the TR3 needed a brake servo but I can see a time when I will swap out the generator for a small alternator.

I did fit auxiliary lighting as my nighttime vision is poor and I added discretely placed USB and 12v power outlets which opens up a big kettle of fish since I kept the car positive ground.

 

Stan

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Jon,

 

As a new Forum member, you will have to get used to

quick and comprehensive replies.

 

So - Unlike most Fora!

 

There are a few chassis upgrades that foster suggests -

I'd go along with those. BUT IF you are contemplating

competition use, there are a few more you could consider.

 

I would DEFINITELY recommend a twin line braking system.

An obvious modification under the bonnet but who cares

when that setup improves safety so much.

 

An alternator and thin belt setup would be recommended.

An alternator hiding in a dynamo casing is what I have

gone for (early TR4). That's not because it's the cheaper

option - just what I prefer.

 

AlanR

Edited by TR 2100

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Brakes are pretty decent on a TR3 so I'd question a brake servo unless you have some physical requirement to have a bit of help. I've seen cars at shows with servo's and they would be pretty hard to hide anywhere in the engine bay.

 

I sit firmly in the seatbelt fitted camp. I'm not convinced by the "safer to be thrown out of the car" argument and the statistics for seatbelt safety speak for themselves. I also have two young kids and it's a legal requirement for them to use a seatbelt regardless of the age of the vehicle (with a suitable booster seat). Typically, they don't go out in it but it's nice to have the option.

 

The only upgrades to my car are: H4 headlamps, uprated clayton heater and negative earth. My car runs quite cool now the block has been cleaned out and a new rad fitted.

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Hi Jon,

 

you don't need a brake servo nor yet a rack and pinion conversion . . . . . not unless advancing years are turning you into a limp-wristed woof.

 

No, I thought not, so you don't need 'em !! :D;)

 

Cheers,

 

Alec

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Jon,go back to Page 3 post 698 and look at ....So what's happening in your Garage...I've uploaded Photos of some TR3 Chassis Mods that I'm doing at the moment with guidance from Stuart

Great stuff, thanks Niall...

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oh and rear shock absorber supports crack.

 

there are strengeners available.

 

John.

Hello John! I'm good thanks, finally getting on with my cars instead of everybody else!! It's a nice feeling :)

 

I'll look into all you have mentioned, Thank you and I'll see you at Malvern if you're going.

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Mmmm seat belts...

 

 

To be launched over the wall into the field where the angry bull is or to be strapped tightly into the raging ball of flames...

 

I never know which is best...

 

:blink::D

Yes John, much better to be strapped in and secure from being ejected into the path of oncoming vehicles either on motorway or B road.

As an alternative to the home "barbecue" you envisage when the ruptured fuel tank allows 10 gallons of flaming fuel to flood past the comedy hardboard rear panel and crisp yourself and other cockpit occupant you can fit an alloy rear firewall (about £60 ish from many of the competition minded TR specialists) which goes behind the hardboard panel between the fuel tank and the occupants and is invisible in use.

 

A bit namby pamby I know but horrible burns will make both yourself and your passenger, wife, girlfriend, partner, significant other ? wish that things could have been different for the cost of a good meal for two, ...it can be, fit the alloy firewall. The RAC Motorsports association insist you have one fitted to compete, and I think they are a jolly good idea also.

 

On the safety front an anti roll over bar even if a single hoop with a crossbrace will give you a better than even chance of walking away from a roll over, plenty available used even probably for around £100, and it will even provide a huge increase in across car strength to prevent a 3.5 ton TRansit Van spoiling your lives when it T bones you at a road junction.

 

Mick Richards

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