Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
fox889

Checking endfloat

Recommended Posts

I know the normal rule of thumb is to use a dial on the crank pulley, but, reading through many various threads on 'endfloat' I came across someone that had the sump off and measured the endfloat at the crank journal with feeler gauges. As I plan to drop my sump in the next few days is this an acceptable alternative?

I have a magnetic dial so if the answer is 'dial only' it's not a problem. It seems possibly an easier way?

 

Thanks

 

Nick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another +1. I recently attempted to teach a class of some 12 electricians how to re-set/adjust valve clearances, although not too far out, none of them made identical adjustments. My point is, we don't all have the same feel for feeler gueges, a DTi doesn't lie.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Folks,

 

Can someone please explain this procedure of measuring the end float from beneath and tell me what this DTi is and how you use it?

 

Any photos of such a device?

 

Thanks.

 

Dave.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dave, if you look on ebay atDial test indicator DTI gauge & magnetic base stand clock gauge TDC UK Seller

this gives you an idea what the dial gauge looks like.

If you look on the 'search' tag above & put in crankshaft endfloat all manner of threads will appear.

Also, if you have the 'brown bible' workshop manual it's in there in much greater detail.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Nick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dave, just found this, again hope this helps?








Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ok, I just 'copied' a photo on the last post & it's now disappeared, sorry but I did try!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Checking the end-float with a DTI.

 

TR6-008-2048_zpsdbddad25.jpg

 

Cheers

 

Graeme

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just want to add that any crank surface

nearly rectangular to the crank moving direcction

can be used for positioning the DTI.

Also the DTI can point into opposite direction.

 

In the car the front side is not that accessible and the rear must

be viewed anyway to change the bearing.

So a counterweight can be turned downwards and used, too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know the normal rule of thumb is to use a dial on the crank pulley, but, reading through many various threads on 'endfloat' I came across someone that had the sump off and measured the endfloat at the crank journal with feeler gauges. As I plan to drop my sump in the next few days is this an acceptable alternative?

I have a magnetic dial so if the answer is 'dial only' it's not a problem. It seems possibly an easier way?

 

Thanks

 

Nick.

Hi Nick

I am dropping my sump this weekend to replace the TWs. Wich TWs are you using and where did/are you get/ing them from?

Good luck with yours and I hope it all goes well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Kevo, sump all dropped.

Just about to put what's happened in a separate thread.

I was going to get all my shells-bearings-thrusts from Revington only because they have HQ bearings & they seem a decent lot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Kevo, sump all dropped.

Just about to put what's happened in a separate thread.

I was going to get all my shells-bearings-thrusts from Revington only because they have HQ bearings & they seem a decent lot.

Cheers Nick, I hope your TWs have not been found in the sump.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Nick

I am dropping my sump this weekend to replace the TWs. Wich TWs are you using and where did/are you get/ing them from?

Good luck with yours and I hope it all goes well.

 

I've just ordered some special Bronze alloy ones from sportycar@britishcarweek.org in the USA they cost 50 bucks each plus shipping (and no doubt British import VAT and admin rip off) As I plan to replace mine soon.

Check out Scott Helms web-site, if your engines out, it's worth considering his 360 degree TW modification using his superior quality TW's.

Edited by Denis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I've just ordered some special Bronze alloy ones from sportycar@britishcarweek.org in the USA they cost 50 bucks each plus shipping (and no doubt British import VAT and admin rip off) As I plan to replace mine soon.

Check out Scott Helms web-site, if your engines out, it's worth considering his 360 degree TW modification using his superior quality TW's.

Hi Denis, I was looking at these and also the ones that S & M Triumph in Lincoln sell but their web site is down at the moment :(. Engine is in & running well (genuine 77K mileage) just doing the on going maintenance. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Checking the end-float with a DTI.

 

TR6-008-2048_zpsdbddad25.jpg

 

Cheers

 

Graeme

Hi Graeme

I take it that yours is in Imperial, can you use metric or is it hard to convert.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Convert...snort, when I took my engineering apprenticeship in the 1970s the advice was ..."buy all your tools in metric another 2 or 3 years and imperial will be defunct".

The fact that all the engineering drawings were still being given to us in imperial meant that within 12 months all the apprentices were converting machines in themselves using metric tools to define imperial measurements. Established toolmakers when presented with metric dimensioned blueprints as they started to come through suddenly became very altruistic and wanted to take an apprentice under their wings !!!

When stacked back to back in engineering the general opinion was imperial was preferred, there's too many digits after the point in metric to define a fine measurement such as a thou or even less, although you'd find yourself doing it.

 

Mick Richards

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Martin,

 

Yes it is imperial, but as Mick says above, I was apprenticed in the seventies, so learnt both systems and it is easy to convert.

 

6 thou. or 0.006" as shown on the DTI converts to 0.1524mm or 152.4 microns.

 

The calculator on your PC will do this easily.

 

Cheers

 

Graeme

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cheers guys

so it looks like i have to take my socks off too :P:D:lol::lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kevo:

Is that bottom end in pieces yet? :)

Hi Nick

Well, everything went well. End float was about 10 thou, so not as bad as I thought when I did a visual check. TW’s have a bit of wear but crank looks nice and polished with no marks as do all other faces.

Main/BE bearings are showing some copper but are standard size and look original.

I’m not too sure were to get the bearings from yet as I would like to get hold of some NOS Vandervell’s but may go Revingtons AE route.

She has done 77k genuine miles and I don’t think the sumps been off much if at all. I also removed the oil pump and did a quick check on tolerances and it is well within spec with just a little marking on the cap. I will give it a good clean, skim the cap and recheck tolerances’ but looking at it now I don’t think I need a new pump.

All in all I am well chuffed with the condition of the engine and there’s just a bit of black goo in the bottom of the sump.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest ntc

Kevo

If the bearings are showing copper I would not spend that much on replacements at this time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kevo

If the bearings are showing copper I would not spend that much on replacements at this time.

 

Hi Neil

Which ones/supplier to go for then, as I assume you are suggesting a rebuild in the future.

Many thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Please familiarise yourself with our Terms and Conditions. By using this site, you agree to the following: Terms of Use.