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john.r.davies

Graphogen, best practice?

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Being just about to build a new engine, I bought some Graphogen.

I've used Camlube before on bearings, thinking that the added lithium will protect for the first startup, but graphite would seem theoreticaly at least to be better.

 

The Instructions on the tube say that it may be used on "All working surfaces....especially cylinder walls and piston rings"

Really? Won't that promote glazing of the bores?

 

I'll be grateful for views from the Delphic oracle that is this Board.

John

Edited by john.r.davies

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John, I have never put it in cylinder bores or piston rings, I just use normal engine oil on those parts.

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A mix of graphogen and engine oil on all the bearing shells and journals, cam lube on the lobes and followers, clean engine oil everywhere except on the pistons above the rings (the lower bores are lubricated by splash and spray once the engine is running, but you want the upper cylinders clean and dry to help the rings bed in) and I bung a litre of 2 stroke oil in the first tankful of petrol, this is assuming the engine is going to be used soon after rebuild, if not then just graphogen on the shells and journals, and make sure oil pressure is built up before the engine is fired up, this method always works for me.

Cheers Rob

 

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I use a mixture of engine oil and STP (50/50) on all bearing surfaces. Sticks like the proverbial.

 

I shall now wait for the howls of outrage about using STP instead of something more modern.

 

Rgds Ian

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There a variety of engine assembly lubes - personal experience with Redline, Lubriplate & STP. Camlube or other specialist equivalents for cam lobes and follower faces only. Don't overdo any of them as most will be wiped off on first rotation and then get into the oil. Too many of these in the oil and it may well interfere with the rings bedding in.

 

Engine oil for the bores (have used gear oil successfully too on the reccomendation of a mechanic friend who suggests it doesn't drain away before start up and gives good initial compression to help the first start before the rings bed in)

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Thanks, guys!

 

The usual multiplicity of wide experience. I'll follow my gut feeling, which is not on the bore walls.

John

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Guest ntc

Really? What special oil is for new rings?

JOhn

Yep

BUT you have to keep the engine above 2000 rpm + as you will have no oil pressure below

Edited by ntc

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Quote, from that site, 'Oilman says, "Use as a second fill for oil for new engines and a first for reconditioned ". Not quite the same as first start-up, and anyway, I was thinking of a special lubricant ot use during the building process.

 

We've all got our own favourite oil to use with anew engine. MIne is supermarket-cheapo, rerefined rubbish plus an extra charge of Zinc.

John

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