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Stuart

 

What's all the fuss about a little draft under the areoscreen, if you’re putting up with flies and a few stones stuck in your forehead and teeth then a few more on the chin is not a problem............. :P

 

Cheers

Andrew

True! :P

Stuart.

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Stuart

 

What's all the fuss about a little draft under the areoscreen, if you’re putting up with flies and a few stones stuck in your forehead and teeth then a few more on the chin is not a problem............. :P

 

Cheers

Andrew

 

The difference is keeping ones cap on at 80 + mph

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The difference is keeping ones cap on at 80 + mph

This raises the issue of appropriate head-wear in a sidescreen car (and, to a lesser extent, any open sportscar).

 

Should one wear the Victor Meldrew flat cap or baseball cap back-to-front a la vintage car driver or sk8r boy, or adopt the beret? The latter probably wouldn't go down too well on this side of La Manche, so that leaves the out-of-fashion woollen bobble/ski hat, or for greater security and retention of a peak to shield the eyes from the occasional low winter sun, either a traditional flying helmet or lumberjack cap with earflaps.

 

As one who is follically-challenged, any constructive views would be appreciated (except drive slower, put the hood on or buy an MGBGT).

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I am reserving my 'hunt for red october' ruskie hat that cost me $10 at the markets behind the church in St Petersburg.

Winter gets cold in Canberra and it covers my ears. The Navy badge looks better than the Air Force badge which would have been my first choice.

However at least one more winter looks like passing before I get to wear it in the 4A.

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Flying helmet every time. keeps yours ears warm (lets face it these days its never hot enough to drive without headgear) and stops the buffeting of the eardrums at high speed which can get very wearing. Finally if you still have hair at least you will be able to get a comb through it this side of Christmas :lol:;)

Stuart

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Flying helmet every time. keeps yours ears warm (lets face it these days its never hot enough to drive without headgear) and stops the buffeting of the eardrums at high speed which can get very wearing. Finally if you still have hair at least you will be able to get a comb through it this side of Christmas :lol:;)

Stuart

 

 

 

 

An old english flat cap will do just as well , but for speeds over 80 mph a french beret will not be blown off .

 

Do not buy the WWII flying goggles with the two piece glass in the lens . When you come to a junction the line in the middle off the glass will make you feel cross eyed .

 

French goggles byLeon Jeantet work well , pricy but nice

 

David S

Edited by Davepowderblue
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I am reserving my 'hunt for red october' ruskie hat that cost me $10 at the markets behind the church in St Petersburg.

Winter gets cold in Canberra and it covers my ears. The Navy badge looks better than the Air Force badge which would have been my first choice.

However at least one more winter looks like passing before I get to wear it in the 4A.

 

photo please ;)

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I've not tried the flying helmet look as we've a USAF airfield (F15's) nearby and don't want to look a 'wannabe'.

I wore a Beret in the US Army and in high wind it inflates and one looks like a french pastry chef.

Wearing a Russian fur cap in Arizona will get you shot.

The ball cap works well if screwed down tightly (just enough blood flow to remain conscious).

Slowing down and/or fitting the windscreen is not an option.

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I am reserving my 'hunt for red october' ruskie hat that cost me $10 at the markets behind the church in St Petersburg.

Nah Littlejim, you don't want one of those, you want one of these..........:lol:

 

328943345ff2ae99cf8f2c4182e14daff07b0703b17cf8335e2f19f9a00e96fa1289c6ad.jpg

 

Cheers

Andrew

Edited by Andrew Smith
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Major Smitskinov,

 

at 80+mph your souvenir of Lubyanka ought to provide sufficent lift to remove you from your seat and guarantee a close encounter with the telegraph wires . . . . suggest you reutilise your Sam Browne as a chin strap :lol:

 

Meanwhile, keep working on the TRK fly-by-wire prototype ;)

 

Cheers,

 

Alec

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Nah Littlejim, you don't want one of those, you want one of these..........:lol:

 

Cheers

Andrew

 

I'd love to get one if I knew what it was. The picture spot said 'image non disponible' in a few languages excluding russian.

(When I tried to find the pic with google I only got a pic of a very rude word refracted through an aquarium, the rude word gets worn on places other than the head.)

Edited by littlejim
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Photobox is ****! :angry:

 

Here you go..........

 

 

 

Cheers

Andrew

 

magic! have no idea how you managed that.

reckon that one would be good for summer here, permanent shade, but the coefficient of drag would probably lift me out of the car, being so little.

They do like gigantic tops on their hats don't they?

In the RAAF everyone wanted the wire out of their cap top and the '1000 hour bash' look.

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  • 5 weeks later...

Tom - With all the effort you are putting into this project, why don't you offer the leather helmet, scarf and goggles as standard equipment. The Russian hat, etc. could be optional.

 

BTW, postmen in Canada wear a very nice hat (somewhat similar to the Russian hat) while making house deliveries during our cold winters. On a very cold and blustery day, the earflaps can come down and are tied under the chin with two strings. If it's not so cold, the ear-flaps fold up on top and the strings tie them up on top making a very nice looking hat.

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Guest colinTR2

post-4152-1231757270_thumb.jpgpost-4152-1231757235_thumb.jpg

 

These two attachments are shots of an original TR2 aeroscreen held by The Register in the office. The rubber seal fits in exactly the same way as it does to the bottom of the windscreen, it is a small section of the windscreen rubber.

cheers

Colin

post-4152-1231757235_thumb.jpg

post-4152-1231757270_thumb.jpg

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These two attachments are shots of an original TR2 aeroscreen held by The Register in the office. The rubber seal fits in exactly the same way as it does to the bottom of the windscreen, it is a small section of the windscreen rubber.

cheers

Colin

 

 

Colin,

Very nice pics. So the rubber seal is sandwiched along the lower frame...is the section that retains the rubber seal on the back side of the frame?

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These two attachments are shots of an original TR2 aeroscreen held by The Register in the office. The rubber seal fits in exactly the same way as it does to the bottom of the windscreen, it is a small section of the windscreen rubber.

cheers

Colin

 

 

Colin,

Very nice pics. So the rubber seal is sandwiched along the lower frame...is the section that retains the rubber seal on the back side of the frame?

I think you will find that the lower edge has a channel routed through the centre of it the same as the lower section of a windscreen frame.

Stuart.

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The conversion that Andy Smith is going to evaluate includes a seal for the bottom of the frame. Full replicas are all but ready as well now.

As in me and TRK....................watch this space and lookout for a future publication of TRAction folks! B)

 

Cheers

Andrew

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hello fellow sidescreeners

 

Just to update you on my Brooklands conversions to Aeroscreens. As you may know Tom Maddock and David Somerville have been working on reproducing authentic looking original Triumph Aeroscreens. In addition, Tom has also been working on a conversion kit for Brooklands – mine are the prototypes. My Brooklands are early 1960s originals and I received the conversions back from David on Thursday. The conversion consists of original style feet, new reshaped glass to the original higher pattern and rubber seals - my original frames were polished and milled where required. The feet bolt into the pre-drilled holes with captive nuts (Pre TS 60,000), so I will have to fill and touch up a few unsightly holes from the where the Brooklands pedestals were previously fitted.

 

This afternoon I offered up the screens to the frames and fitted the glass, please see photographs below. Having masked up the exposed area I bonded the glass with Sikaflex-EBT. I will now leave the bonding to cure for a few days before I trim off the excess and fill any gaps, but already I can see they are going to look fantastic!

 

Next job will be to fit the rubber seals and then out for a test drive, can't wait!!

 

No more flies on me!!! B)

 

 

 

Cheers

Andrew

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hi andrew,

 

they look good!

 

but, forgive me if i'm wrong, haven't you got them on backwards? i think the idea is that you can refit the windscreen and leave the feet (and possibly the aeroscreens) still mounted on the scuttle.

 

cheers

 

alan

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