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TomMull

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  1. I have several TR3A cylinder cores all with 1 inch bore. I think all the Girling system cars had the 1 inch bore. Parts book shows the Lockheed cylinder bore at 1 1/8 but I don't have one of those to measure. Tom
  2. I think the diagram above shows the TR2, no second silencer etc and the ugly center bracket. Tom
  3. Here is a rather poor copy of the ST parts list. Some of the clamps are designed to work with the hangers.
  4. My thought also. 50+ years ago one of my mentors told me that 90% of SU carburetor problems were electrical in nature, and instructed me to make absolutely sure the ignition system was perfect before even touching the carbs. As for one piston lifting sooner or higher, that's usually a poorly adjusted link between the carbs. Tom
  5. Welcome Geoff, Not much to go on but my first guess would be the exhaust touching the frame where it goes through the box section. Tom
  6. I've never noticed any but they are shown in the Standard Triumph hardware catalog: Tom
  7. Here's some notes from the MG Guru here in the US : https://www.tr-register.co.uk/forums/index.php?/topic/69675-p700-headlamp/ NOS examples are going for around $75 over here. Moss has some presumably reproduction examples, also pricey. Similar US lamp is 6014 but of course not British, now also NLA. They are replaced with Halogen 6024 for about $10. Down side is they tax the dynamo a bit more. I appreciate originality but cross the line with light bulbs. I wonder if the judges ever ask you to turn them on? Tom
  8. Stan, My 2002 Forester would serve as an exemplar for piston slap. It sounds like it's crushing rocks until it gets darn good and warm. It's been doing that for all of the 200k miles I've owned it. Yours does not sound anything like that. And Ian, I'm 3 days out from under the eye surgeon's knife and the result is dramatic to say the least. Hope your visit goes as well. Tom
  9. That's what I'd do but if the issue is with coolant circulation it might still go away if the water pump wasn't turning. Do you have a bellows thermostat? Tom
  10. Yes, do check. The purpose of those gear adapters was not only to change direction of the cable but to compensate for different transmission and axle ratios (there were straight adapters also). They were available in a variety of ratios including 1:1. We used them regularly on trucks back in the day. That said, neither of my TR3s have adapters. Tom
  11. Most of the inner core kits I've seen come with one end of the core squared and a stake on end for the other. There's a little tool to stake with that comes in the kit that I find very marginally adequate at best. I prefer to do the whole thing, even though it takes a bit more time and effort. Tom
  12. My limited experience, two cars, would support Rod's comment in the original post and your time frame. My 1960 TR3 was red with a red frame. I only recently discovered this after 55 years of ownership because the car was undercoated with black by the selling dealer, a common practice then. Stripping the frame revealed the red paint. My 59 was originally white and has what appears to be a powder blue chassis from the traces remaining. I find that a good place to check is behind the rear shock mounting surface. (I initially thought this red might be red primer but it is a very close match to signal red and blue on the other car.) Of course there is ample opportunity things got monkeyed with in the 60 or so years since these were built. The rear bumpers are curious but I can't see what would be gained by changing the assembly procedure for the camera. The film is very interesting piece of history at any rate. How things have changed! Tom
  13. I fail to understand why someone would go to the expense, time and effort of a long door restoration and use incorrect seats and wing beading. It makes you wonder what else is wrong, "engine block re-bored for example". Is that even possible? I will concede however, that the price seems to reflect the deficiencies and it's still a desirable Triumph. Tom
  14. The line in question does not appear to follow a true radius and looks to me like it was done unskillfully by hand.
  15. Bidders seem to wait until the very end. Sold for $26500 (£20310), still a very good buy IMO.
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